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15 words you never knew came from literature

15 words you never knew came from literature
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Idioms – as clear as mud? Miranda Steel is a freelance ELT lexicographer and editor. She has worked as a Senior Editor for dictionaries for learners at OUP and has also worked for COBUILD. In this post, she looks at some of the weird and wonderful idioms in the English language. Idioms are commonly used in spoken and written English. They add colour and interest to what we are saying. Shirley Hughes Shirley Hughes, OBE (born 16 July 1927) is an English author and illustrator. She has written more than fifty books, which have sold more than 11.5 million copies, and has illustrated more than two hundred. As of 2007 she lives in London.[1][2][3][4]

11 Quotes that Inspire Writers Workshop Lessons and Activities How do you learn to write? By reading the works of great writers! Here are 11 quotes about the writing process and the writing lessons and projects they can inspire by WeAreTeachers lesson-ideas blogger Erin Bittman. All-TIME 100 Novels Welcome to the massive, anguished, exalted undertaking that is the ALL TIME 100 books list. The parameters: English language novels published anywhere in the world since 1923, the year that TIME Magazine began, which, before you ask, means that Ulysses (1922) doesn’t make the cut. In May, Time.com posted a similar list, of 100 movies picked by our film critics, Richard Corliss and Richard Schickel. This one is chosen by me, Richard Lacayo, and my colleague Lev Grossman, whom we sometimes cite as proof that you don’t need to be named Richard to be hired as a critic at TIME, though apparently it helps. Just ask our theater critic, Richard Zoglin.

100 Whimsical Words by Mark Nichol The English language can be maddening to native speakers and learners alike, but is also delightfully rich, especially for those who seek to convey a lighthearted tone in their writing. Here are 100 words it’s difficult to employ without smiling. E. Nesbit Edith Nesbit (married name Edith Bland; 15 August 1858 – 4 May 1924) was an English author and poet; she published her books for children under the name of E. Nesbit. Biography[edit] Nesbit was born in 1858 at 38 Lower Kennington Lane in Kennington, Surrey (now part of Greater London), the daughter of an agricultural chemist, John Collis Nesbit, who died in March 1862, before her fourth birthday.

11 Vocabulary and Test Review Games and Activities to Keep Your Students Thinking from Sadlier School WeAreTeachers is pleased to welcome guest teacher blogger Sarah Ressler. Sarah is a high school English teacher and writes the Vocab Girl blog at Sadlier School. Find Sarah's blog, as well as free language arts lesson plans, classroom activities and games, at Sadlier’s PubHub. How do you make those vocab words stick—not just for the quiz tomorrow but for the long term? Word Up: The Must Dos of Vocabulary Instruction A while ago, I wrote a post called Doing It Differently: Tips for Teaching Vocabulary which spells out (get it?) the process and rationale for selecting certain vocabulary words and also describes six steps for teaching new words. Here, I'm going to add to that earlier musing on this topic by offering up some must dos that took me a few years down the teaching road to figure out. Must Do #1: Be Very Selective As for vocabulary lists, less is better. Long lists of words just don't stick.

The Railway Children Plot summary[edit] The story concerns a family who move to "Three Chimneys", a house near the railway, after the father, who works at the Foreign office, is imprisoned after being falsely accused of spying. The children befriend an Old Gentleman who regularly takes the 9:15 train near their home; he is eventually able to help prove their father's innocence, and the family is reunited. The family take care of a Russian exile, Mr Szczepansky, who came to England looking for his family (later located) and Jim, the grandson of the Old Gentleman, who suffers a broken leg in a tunnel.

Shakespearean Musical Chair My AP students enter my class having read Romeo and Juliet in ninth grade… and that’s it. No Othello in 10th. No Julius Caesar. No Hamlet.

Related:  books and writers