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The 100 Most Beautiful Words in English

The 100 Most Beautiful Words in English
ere are the 100 most beautiful words in English. How do we know we have the most beautiful? They were chosen by Robert Beard, who has been making dictionaries, creating word lists, and writing poetry for 40 years. For five years he wrote the Word of the Day at yourDictionary.com and since 2004 he has written up 1500 words in the series, So, What's the Good Word? here at alphaDictionary. Below is a select list of his favorite words that he used in his poetry—or wishes he had. Dr. The words in this book will decorate your articles, essays, blogs, term papers, memos, love letters-even conversations with those we love.

http://www.alphadictionary.com/articles/100_most_beautiful_words.html

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s New Word Page: Related Words You probably noticed that last month we launched a redesigned word page, and that our new pages include an expanded Related Words section. What do we mean by “related words”? Synonyms, hypernyms, hyponyms, words used in the same context, a reverse dictionary, and tags. But what does all of that mean? Here’s the top of the word page for tree: Click on Relate and you’ll be taken here: Grandiloquent Dictionary This is the result of an ongoing project to collect and distribute the most obscure and rare words in the English language. It also contains a few words which do not have equivalent words in English. At present, the dictionary contains approximately 2700 words, though it is constantly growing. Following a large number of requests, pronounciations are now being (slowly) added to the listing, although it will be a long time before they are all added. After almost three years of work, the new

Synonyms for words commonly used in student's writing Amazing- incredible, unbelievable, improbable, fabulous, wonderful, fantastic, astonishing, astounding, extraordinary Anger- enrage, infuriate, arouse, nettle, exasperate, inflame, madden Angry- mad, furious, enraged, excited, wrathful, indignant, exasperated, aroused, inflamed Answer- reply, respond, retort, acknowledge Unusual Words Unusual Words A by no means exhaustive list of rare, obscure, strange and sometimes funny words and their meanings that only seem to crop up in crosswords and dictionaries. Words that are used so seldom, you wonder who invented them and why. Thought for the Day In the face of an obstacle, which is impossible to overcome, stubbornness is stupid. —Simone de Beauvoir Sudden obstacles, barriers in the way of our progress, doors that unexpectedly close, may confuse, frustrate, and even depress us. The knowledge that we seldom understand just what is best for us comes slowly. And we generally fight it, even after we've begun to understand. Fortunately, the better path will keep drawing us to it.

What is Experimental Literature? {Five Questions: Dennis Cooper} According to his official bio, Dennis Cooper was born, he grew up, he wrote, he attended, he transferred, he was expelled, he met, he attended, he then attended, he studied, he founded, he lived, he moved, he began. And now he currently spends his time between Los Angeles and Paris. Harper Perennial will release his newest novel The Marbled Swarm in November 2011, and next month they will be republishing Horror Hospital Unplugged: his 1997 graphic novel collaboration with artist Keith Mayerson. He blogs at denniscooper-theweaklings.blogspot.com. Question #1 – The Body

Luciferous Logolepsy Welcome to Luciferous Logolepsy, a collection of over 9,000 obscure English words. Though the definition of an "English" word might seem to be straightforward, it is not. There exist so many adopted, derivative, archaic or abandoned words in what we loosely define as the "English Language", that a clear-cut definition seems impossible. For the purposes of this project though, words are included that may stretch any basic definitions. Particular attention has been paid to archaic words, as they tend to be more evocative - as if their very age lends additional meaning or overtones. Current personal favorites include "skirr", "epicaricacy" and "schizothemia".

Describing food - World Food and Wine Describing food is not as easy as it would seem. How many ways can you say something was really tasty? Not enough to keep you interested in what you are writing. That is why we have to borrow words from other areas to describe the food and the effect it has on us. You can compare a dish to a picture, a sports game, a musical performance or give it personality. 20 obsolete English words that should make a comeback Photo: Katherine Hodgson If we all start using them, these words can be resurrected. DURING MY UNDERGRADUATE studies as a Linguistics major, one of the things that struck me most is the amazing fluidity of language. British, Canadian and American Spelling Sharing research and ideas on Linguistics, Applied Linguistics and ELT (English Language Teaching) Differences between British, Canadian and American Spelling by Karen Bond This list is very much a work-in-progress. If you find any inaccuracies, or can think of any words or spellings that I have omitted, please email me at teacherkarenb @ hotmail.com.

Writer & Graphic Designer This is a list compiled from many different resources. This is a list of colours, as you can so plainly see. Enjoy! To view this site in the best format it's recommended you use Firefox, Chrome, Safari or at least IE 9, or you may experience discrepancies. Lost in Translation - Cross-language computer translation "Language is the source of misunderstandings." — Antoine de Saunt-Exupéry in The Little Prince Important: Systran, which for years provided our translation functionality, shut down their service in May. We're now using Google Translate.

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