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Words are living species of unconscious intentions. Please consider for a moment the benefits of using keymaker clauses instead of gatekeeper clauses. : C_S_T. Hyperphagia. Parabiosis. Dysphemism - Wikipedia. A dysphemism is an expression with connotations that are offensive either about the subject matter or to the audience, or both. Dysphemisms contrast with neutral or euphemistic expressions.[1] Dysphemism is sometimes motivated by feelings such as fear, distaste, hatred, and contempt. Worded simply, a dysphemism is a derogatory or unpleasant term used instead of a pleasant or neutral one, such as “loony bin” for “mental hospital.”

Etymology[edit] The word dysphemism comes from the Greek dys δύς "mis-" and pheme φήμη "speech, voice, reputation". Related terms include malphemism (from the Latin malus "bad"), and cacophemism (from the Greek kakos κακός "bad"). Usage[edit] One common use of dysphemism is the disenfranchisement of one social group by another. A dysphemism is a marked form which expresses the speaker's view or attitude towards the listener or group, as opposed to a form that is typical of his or her speech. Types[edit] Synecdoche[edit] Dysphemistic epithets[edit] "Shoot! " Psychologem. Reference: psychologem Reference information:If you want to have a clear understanding of the meaning of "psychologem", you have to understand Carl Jung's notions of "archtype" and "collective unconscious".

According to Jung, the psychologem is "an archetypal psychic structure of extreme antiquity". In his clearest manifestations, he is a faithful copy of an absolutely undifferentiated human consciousness, corresponding to a psyche that has hardly left animal level. In other words, the psychologem is "the subjective presentation of different aspects of one's present identity". Collective unconscious: In Jungian psychology, a part of the unconscious mind, shared by a society, a people, or all humankind, that is the product of ancestral experience and contains such concepts as science, religion, and morality. Antinomian. Quid pro quo. Antichristus,[1] a woodcut by Lucas Cranach the Elder, of the pope using the temporal power to grant authority to a ruler contributing generously to the Catholic Church Quid pro quo ("something for something" in Latin)[2] is a Latin phrase used in English to mean an exchange of goods or services, in which one transfer is contingent upon the other; "a favour for a favour".

Phrases with similar meanings include: "give and take", "tit for tat", and "you scratch my back, and I'll scratch yours" and "one hand washes the other". In common law[edit] In common law, quid pro quo indicates that an item or a service has been traded in return for something of value, usually when the propriety or equity of the transaction is in question. A contract must involve consideration: that is, the exchange of something of value for something else of value.

In the U.S., lobbyists are legally entitled to support candidates that hold positions with which the donors agree, or which will benefit the donors. Finnegan's wake and fractal multiplicity. Atavism. Early embryos of various species display some ancestral features, like the tail on this human embryo. These features normally disappear in later development, but it may not happen if the animal has an atavism.[1][2] In social sciences, atavism is the tendency of reversion. For example, people in the modern era reverting to the ways of thinking and acting of a former time. The word atavism is derived from the Latin atavus—a great-great-great-grandfather or, more generally, an ancestor.

Biology[edit] Evolutionarily traits that have disappeared phenotypically do not necessarily disappear from an organism's DNA. Other examples of observed atavisms include: Culture[edit] Atavism is a term in Joseph Schumpeter's explanation of World War I in twentieth-century liberal Europe. Social Darwinism[edit] See also[edit] References[edit] ^ Uthman, Ed (2014). External links[edit] Charlatan. A charlatan (also called swindler or mountebank) is a person practising quackery or some similar confidence trick in order to obtain money, fame or other advantages via some form of pretense or deception. The word comes from French charlatan, a seller of medicines who might advertise his presence with music and an outdoor stage show.

The best known of the Parisian charlatans was Tabarin, who set up a stage in the Place Dauphine, Paris in 1618, and whose commedia dell'arte inspired skits and whose farces inspired Molière. The word can also be traced to Spanish; charlatán, an indiscreetly talkative person, a chatterbox. Ultimately, etymologists trace "charlatan" from either the Italian ciarlare, to prattle; or from Cerretano, a resident of Cerreto, a village in Umbria, known for its quacks.[1] Details[edit] In usage, a subtle difference is drawn between the charlatan and other kinds of confidence trickster.

"Quack" is a reference to "quackery" or the practice of dubious medicine. John R. Grifter. We Can Do It! American wartime propaganda poster J. Howard Miller's "We Can Do It! " poster from 1943 After its rediscovery, observers often assumed that the image was always used as a call to inspire women workers to join the war effort. However, during the war the image was strictly internal to Westinghouse, displayed only during February 1943, and was not for recruitment but to exhort already-hired women to work harder.[2] People have seized upon the uplifting attitude and apparent message to remake the image into many different forms, including self empowerment, campaign promotion, advertising, and parodies.

After she saw the Smithsonian cover image in 1994, Geraldine Hoff Doyle mistakenly said that she was the subject of the poster. Background[edit] A propaganda poster from 1942 encouraging unity between labor and management of GM After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the U.S. government called upon manufacturers to produce greater amounts of war goods. J. J. Westinghouse Electric[edit] Grisette. Saturnian. Anathema. Anathema is a term with several meanings. It derives from Greek ἀνάθεμα, which meant "something dedicated" and, in the Septuagint and New Testament, "something dedicated to evil and thus accursed. "[1] Colloquial usage[edit] In general usage, the word "anathema" means vehement disagreement with or dislike of something. Examples: "Some people consider this definition anathema;" or "Doing homework after school is a complete anathema to her;" or "That political party would paint as anathema any idea not their own, no matter how good it is.

" Religious usage[edit] The Old Testament applied the word to anything set aside for sacrifice, and thus banned from profane use and dedicated to destruction—as, in the case of religious wars, the enemy and their cities and possessions. Judaism[edit] New Testament[edit] The noun ἀνάθεμα (anathema) occurs in the Greek New Testament six times: in 1 Cor 12:3; 16:22; 9&src=ESV Gal 1:8, 9; Rom 9:3; Acts 23:14.

Early Church[edit] Orthodoxy[edit] Catholicism[edit] Desideratum. Immanence. Legerdemain. Patiens. Grammatische Funktion - semantische Rolle[Bearbeiten] Subjekte von Verben wie „sterben“, „niesen“ und „erschrecken“ können jedoch auch als Patiens gedeutet werden, auch wenn sie im Deutschen mit dem Nominativ gekennzeichnet werden. Beispiele[Bearbeiten] In den folgenden Beispielen nimmt Peter die Rolle des Patiens ein: Der Vater schlägt Peter. (Aktiv)Peter wird vom Vater geschlagen. (Passiv) Im ersten Beispiel ist der Vater Agens und Subjekt des Satzes, Peter ist Patiens und direktes Objekt des Satzes.

Weblinks[Bearbeiten] Agens. Agens (lateinisch das Handelnde, Darstellende, Führende, Tuende, Verfahrende, Vorgehende, Wirkende, Mehrzahl eingedeutscht Agenzien oder lateinisch Agentia) steht für: Anathema. Anathema is a term with several meanings. It derives from Greek ἀνάθεμα, which meant "something dedicated" and, in the Septuagint and New Testament, "something dedicated to evil and thus accursed. "[1] Colloquial usage[edit] In general usage, the word "anathema" means vehement disagreement with or dislike of something. Examples: "Some people consider this definition anathema;" or "Doing homework after school is a complete anathema to her;" or "That political party would paint as anathema any idea not their own, no matter how good it is.

" Religious usage[edit] The Old Testament applied the word to anything set aside for sacrifice, and thus banned from profane use and dedicated to destruction—as, in the case of religious wars, the enemy and their cities and possessions. Judaism[edit] New Testament[edit] The noun ἀνάθεμα (anathema) occurs in the Greek New Testament six times: in 1 Cor 12:3; 16:22; 9&src=ESV Gal 1:8, 9; Rom 9:3; Acts 23:14. Early Church[edit] Orthodoxy[edit] Catholicism[edit] Pneuma. Classical antiquity[edit] Presocratics[edit] Pneuma, "air in motion, breath, wind," is equivalent in the material monism of Anaximenes to aer (ἀήρ, "air") as the element from which all else originated. This usage is the earliest extant occurrence of the term in philosophy.[4] A quotation from Anaximenes observes that "just as our soul (psyche), being air (aer), holds us together, so do breath (pneuma) and air (aer) encompass the whole world.

" In this early usage, aer and pneuma are synonymous.[5] Ancient Greek medical theory[edit] The disciples of Hippocrates explained the maintenance of vital heat to be the function of the breath within the organism. Aristotle[edit] The "connate pneuma" of Aristotle is the warm mobile "air" that in the sperm transmits the capacity for locomotion and certain sensations to the offspring. Stoic pneuma[edit] Judaism and Christianity[edit] In Judaic and Christian usage, pneuma is a common word for "spirit" in the Septuagint and the Greek New Testament.

CCER-"Hieroglyphica" Thane. Not to be confused with Thegn. This article is about the city in Maharashtra, India. For its namesake district, see Thane district. Thane (IPA: [ˈʈʰaːɳeː]) is a city in Maharashtra, India, at the head of the Thane Creek. The name comes from corruption of its ancient name Shri Sthanak in Maharashtri Prakrit language, its earlier name based on a temple of Ganesha.

Thane also known as 'the city of lakes' is the administrative headquarters of Thane district. On 16 April 1854, the G.I.P. Geography[edit] It is located to the northeast of Mumbai, partly on Salsette Island (it shares that island with the Mumbai City District, with Mumbai Suburban District and with Mira-Bhayandar Municipal Corporation), and partly on the mainland across Thane Creek. City of Lakes[edit] View of Masunda Lake (Talav Pali) from St.John The Baptist High School.

Thane is also known as the City of Lakes. Climate[edit] Thane has a tropical monsoon climate that borders on a tropical wet and dry climate. Demographics[edit] A. Effluvia. Apophasis. Apophasis (Late Latin, from Greek ἀπόφασις from ἀπόφημι—apophemi,[1] "to say no"[2]), Paralipsis (παράλειψις) or occupatio,[3][4][5][6] also spelled paraleipsis or paralepsis, and known also as praeteritio, preterition, cataphasis (κατάφασις), antiphrasis (ἀντίφρασις), or parasiopesis (παρασιώπησις), is a rhetorical device wherein the speaker or writer brings up a subject by either denying it, or denying that it should be brought up.[7] As such, it can be seen as a rhetorical relative of irony.

Paralipsis is usually employed to make a subversive ad hominem attack, which makes it a frequently used tactic in political speeches to make an attack on one's opponent. Using paralipsis in this way is often considered to be bad form. The device is typically used to distance the speaker from unfair claims, while still bringing them up. For instance, a politician might say, "I don't even want to talk about the allegations that my opponent is a drunk. " Proslepsis[edit] With proper names[edit]

Cormorants. Antediluvian. Desultory.