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Mesopotamia

Halsall Home | Medieval Sourcebook | Modern History Sourcebook Other History Sourcebooks: African | East Asian | Indian | Islamic | Jewish | LGBT | Women's | Global | Science See Main Page for a guide to all contents of all sections. Common Issues: Mesopotamian/Egyptian/Hebrew/Greek History MEGA Abzu: Guide to Resources for the Study of the Ancient Near East Available on the Internet [At Chicago] 2ND Emergence of Civilization in Ancient Near East [At Internet Archive, from UNT][Modern Account] 2ND The Near East 3000-1200 BCE [At Internet Archive, from UNT][Modern Account] 2ND The Near East 1250-500 BCE [At Internet Archive, from UNT][Modern Account] 2ND Arden Eby: The Origin and Development of Writing in Mesopotamia : An Economic Interpretation [At Internet Archive][Modern Illustrated Account] Interactive Map: Political Change in Ancient Mesopotamia , 3000-1000 BCE [At U. The Emergence of Kingship: Inscription of Umma and Lagash , c. 2500BCE [At piney.com] 2ND Arthur A. 2ND Harry A. Related:  the study words

Middle East Media Research Institute Staff[edit] MEMRI's founding staff of seven included three who had formerly served in military intelligence in the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF).[3][4] MEMRI president and founder Yigal Carmon states that MEMRI's current staff includes "people of the Jewish, Christian and Muslim faiths [who] hold a range of political views."[5] Objectives and projects[edit] MEMRI's original mission statement read: "In its research, the institute puts emphasis on the continuing relevance of Zionism to the Jewish people and to the state of Israel Concerning this change in their 'mission statement,' Political Research Associates (PRA), which studies the US political right, notes that it occurred three weeks after the September 11 attacks, and considers MEMRI "was previously more forthcoming about its political orientation in its self-description and in staff profiles on its website." Languages[edit] Financial support[edit] Reception[edit] Accusations of bias[edit] Selectivity[edit]

Main Page The Internet Ancient History Sourcebook has expanded greatly since its creation, and now contains hundred of local files as well as links to source texts throughout the net. See Introduction for an explanation of the Sourcebook's goals. See the Help! page for all the help on research I can offer. Although I am more than happy to receive notes if you have comments on this web site, I cannot answer specific research enquiries [and - for students - I cannot, or rather will not, do your homework.] The Ancient History Sourcebook works as follows: This Main Index page [this page] shows all sections and sub sections. To access the sub-section pages , simply browse the sections below and select the highlighted (white text with blue background) section title on the left. In addition there are two navigation bars on the left of each page for every sub-section For materials added since July 1998 see the New Additions page. Additional Study/Research Aids Introduction Paul Halsall , Compiler and Editor

10th Century Hebrew Inscription on Pottery from Khirbet Qeiyafa, Israel Confirms Biblical Claims Introduction Many skeptics claim that the Bible wasn't written until the fifth century B.C., since ancient Hebrew wasn't even in existence until then. However, recent discoveries show written Hebrew was in existence by the 10th century, B.C. To the surprise of many skeptics, an ancient Hebrew inscription, dated to the 10th century B.C. was discovered in 2006. Now, the most ancient example of the Hebrew language has been found on a pottery shard in Khirbet Qeiyafa, 20 miles southwest of Jerusalem, near the Elah Valley in Israel.1 New evidence The archaeological site of Khirbet Qeiyafa is the location of a massively fortified city of megalithic stones 6-9 ft tall.2 In 2008, two city gates were discovered, which was very unusual for cities of that time (which usually had only one gate). The pottery shard containing the inscription was discovered by Professor Yosef Garfinkel in 2008. you shall not do [it], but worship the [Lord]. Conclusion The discovery of the 10th century B.C. References

The History of the Ancient Near East Electronic Compendium Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs Home DictionaryComposeWriteName Privacy policyContact info Available at:AmazonBarnes & Noble Available at:AmazonBarnes & Noble © by Paul Sciortino XHTML 1.0 | CSS 2.0 New World Encyclopedia Most ancient Hebrew biblical inscription deciphered, scholar says A breakthrough in the research of the Hebrew scriptures has shed new light on the period in which the Bible was written. Professor Gershon Galil of the Department of Biblical Studies at the University of Haifa has deciphered an inscription on a pottery shard discovered in the Elah valley dating from the 10th century BCE (the period of King David's reign), and has shown that this is a Hebrew inscription. The discovery makes this the earliest known Hebrew writing. The significance of this breakthrough relates to the fact that at least some of the biblical scriptures were composed hundreds of years before the dates presented today in research and that the Kingdom of Israel already existed at that time. Prof. A breakthrough in the research of the Hebrew scriptures has shed new light on the period in which the Bible was written. Prof. Prof. The contents of the text express social sensitivity to the fragile position of weaker members of society. English translaton of the deciphered text:

Sumerian Language Page Ancient World The Bibliography of Ancient Egypt speak There are no items for this category speak v. make a characteristic or natural sound; "The drums spoke" address, speak v. give a speech to; "The chairman addressed the board of trustees" speak, talk v. use language; "the baby talks already"; "the prisoner won't speak"; "they speak a strange dialect" talk, speak v. exchange thoughts; talk with; "We often talk business"; "Actions talk louder than words" lecture, talk v. deliver a lecture or talk; "She will talk at Rutgers next week"; "Did you ever lecture at Harvard?" elaborate, lucubrate, expatiate, exposit, enlarge, flesh out, expand, expound, dilate v. add details, as to an account or idea; clarify the meaning of and discourse in a learned way, usually in writing; "She elaborated on the main ideas in her dissertation" chew the fat, shoot the breeze, chat, confabulate, confab, chitchat, chit-chat, chatter, chaffer, natter, gossip, jaw, claver, visit address, call

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