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Otis Redding-Sitting on the dock of the bay

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCmUhYSr-e4

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Jimmy Ruffin, Motown singer, dies aged 78 20 November 2014Last updated at 01:08 ET Ruffin, pictured in 1998, was approached to join the Temptations before his brother Jimmy Ruffin, the Motown performer who scored his biggest hit with 1966's What Becomes of the Broken Hearted, has died at the age of 78. News of his death follows reports last month that he was seriously ill and in intensive care at a Las Vegas hospital. Abba's Agnetha comes out of retirement 10 March 2013Last updated at 21:28 ET By Mark Savage Arts and entertainment reporter, BBC News Agnetha Faltskog's new song When You Really Loved Someone One of pop's most enigmatic voices has emerged with her first album in nine years. Top 10 Irish Music Starter CDs Boiling Irish music down into just ten CDs is impossible, but if you're a beginner, you've got to start somewhere, right? These excellent albums might be just the introduction you're looking for. If you're already a big Irish music fan and you don't happen to have any of these in your collection, what are you waiting for? 1.

Skiffle Skiffle is a type of popular music with jazz, blues, folk, and roots influences, usually using homemade or improvised instruments. Originating as a term in the United States in the first half of the twentieth century, it became popular again in the UK in the 1950s, where it was mainly associated with musician Lonnie Donegan and played a major part in beginning the careers of later eminent jazz, pop, blues, folk and rock musicians. American skiffle[edit] The origins of skiffle are obscure but are generally thought to lie in African-American musical culture in the early twentieth century. Skiffle is often said to have developed from New Orleans jazz, but this claim has been disputed.[1] Improvised jug bands playing blues and jazz were common across the American South in the early decades of the twentieth century, even if the term skiffle was not used to describe them.[2] The first use of the term on record was in 1925 in the name of Jimmy O'Bryant and his Chicago Skifflers.

The Chieftains Jones Hall, Houston 2013PHOTOGRAPHER: Lauren Harnett 2017 marks their 55th Anniversary and The Chieftains invite you to come celebrate with them at a concert or two. Starting in February, you can expect to see The Chieftains performing throughout the United States. For dates and details click here. The Chieftains are excited to announce that they will be performing in Toulouse and Quimper France in June. It has been three years since they were last in France and they are so thrilled to make their return.

Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven ( i/ˈlʊdvɪɡ væn ˈbeɪ.toʊvən/; German: [ˈluːtvɪç fan ˈbeːt.hoːfən] ( Born in Bonn, then the capital of the Electorate of Cologne and part of the Holy Roman Empire, Beethoven displayed his musical talents at an early age and was taught by his father Johann van Beethoven and Christian Gottlob Neefe. During his first 22 years in Bonn, Beethoven intended to study with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and befriended Joseph Haydn.

Celtic music Celtic music is a broad grouping of musical genres that evolved out of the folk musical traditions of the Celtic people of Western Europe.[1][2] It refers to both orally-transmitted traditional music and recorded music and the styles vary considerably to include everything from "trad" (traditional) music to a wide range of hybrids. Often the melodic line moves up and down the primary chords in so many songs. There are a number of possible reasons for this: Melodic variation can be easily introduced. These two latter usage patterns may simply be remnants of formerly widespread melodic practices. Often, the term Celtic music is applied to the music of Ireland and Scotland because both lands have produced well-known distinctive styles which actually have genuine commonality and clear mutual influences.

Irish flute The term Irish Flute (Irish: fliúít Gaelach) or "Scottish Flute" (in a Scottish setting)[1] refers to a conical-bore, simple-system wooden flute of the type favoured by classical flautists of the early 19th century, or to a flute of modern manufacture derived from this design (often with modifications to optimize its use in Irish Traditional Music or Scottish Traditional Music[1]). The vast majority of traditional Irish flute players use a wooden, simple-system flute.[2] Although it was, and is, played in every county in Ireland, the flute has a very strong heartland in the mid-western counties of Sligo, Leitrim and Roscommon, with South Fermanagh, East Galway, Clare and West Limerick also having a reputation.[3] §Physical characteristics[edit] The flute has six main finger-holes.

Celtic Woman Albums[edit] The release of the second album, Celtic Woman: A Christmas Celebration, on 19 October 2006 knocked their first album to the #2 spot on the World Music chart.[9] In preparation for their third studio album, Celtic Woman performed at Slane Castle in County Meath, Ireland, on 23 and 24 August 2006, with this show airing on PBS during December 2006. The studio album, titled Celtic Woman: A New Journey, was released on 30 January 2007. As with their debut, the live performance was released on DVD simultaneously. Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time "The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time" is a 2003 special issue of American magazine Rolling Stone, and a related book published in 2005.[1] The lists presented were compiled based on votes from selected rock musicians, critics, and industry figures, and predominantly feature British and American music from the 1960s and 1970s. From 2007 onwards, the magazine published similarly titled lists in other countries around the world. In 2012, Rolling Stone published a revised edition of the list drawing on the original and a later survey of albums in the 2000s.[2] It was made available in "bookazine" format on newsstands in the US from April 27 to July 25. The new list contained 38 albums not present in the previous one, 16 of them released after 2003. Background[edit]

Top 100 Best Acoustic Songs Ever -The Greatest of All Time Here is a list of the best acoustic songs ever written. Acoustic music has come a long way over the years, so many are “oldies” and many are “newies.” We are basing this list off of historical album sales, the ever so objective factor of acoustic-ness, but mostly how easily they make us cry.

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