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Supporting Multiple Screens

Supporting Multiple Screens
Android runs on a variety of devices that offer different screen sizes and densities. For applications, the Android system provides a consistent development environment across devices and handles most of the work to adjust each application's user interface to the screen on which it is displayed. At the same time, the system provides APIs that allow you to control your application's UI for specific screen sizes and densities, in order to optimize your UI design for different screen configurations. For example, you might want a UI for tablets that's different from the UI for handsets. Although the system performs scaling and resizing to make your application work on different screens, you should make the effort to optimize your application for different screen sizes and densities. In doing so, you maximize the user experience for all devices and your users believe that your application was actually designed for their devices—rather than simply stretched to fit the screen on their devices.

http://developer.android.com/guide/practices/screens_support.html

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Exclude SDK versions Google Play Filtering Google Play uses the <uses-sdk> attributes declared in your app manifest to filter your app from devices that do not meet it's platform version requirements. Before setting these attributes, make sure that you understand Google Play filters. syntax: contained in: Android Game Development Tutorials Some months ago we received an email from a fellow Java developer, Tamas Jano, asking to be part of our JCG partners program. To our surprise he maintains a blog named “Against The Grain” debating about game development for the Android platform. I have been reading all of his articles since then and I must admit that his writings have been an inspiration and a motivation for me and my colleagues here at Java Code Geeks so as to start developing our first game for the Android platform. With this post I would like to present Tamas‘s work to our community hoping that you will be inspired and motivated just like we did!

Designing For Android Advertisement For designers, Android is the elephant in the room when it comes to app design. As much as designers would like to think it’s an iOS world in which all anyones cares about are iPhones, iPads and the App Store, nobody can ignore that Android currently has the majority of smartphone market share and that it is being used on everything from tablets to e-readers. In short, the Google Android platform is quickly becoming ubiquitous, and brands are starting to notice. But let’s face it. Android’s multiple devices and form factors make it feel like designing for it is an uphill battle.

Designing (and converting) for multiple mobile densities With Apple leading the movement, phones, tablets, laptops, and desktop displays are rapidly increasing in resolution. This is wonderful for everyday mobile users, as the quality of their device screens become sharper and allow them to better experience the finer details of an application. But this creates an interesting challenge — designing for multiple mobile densities. Understanding densities The sharpness of your phone or tablet’s display is referred to as density. iOS devices measure density in PPI (pixels per inch) and Android in DPI (dots per inch).

UI Guidelines for mobile and tablet web app design Official user interface (UI) and user experience (UX) guidelines from the manufacturers, links to which you can find below, are a source of inspiration for mobile web and app design. Here, you will find guidelines, samples, tips, and descriptions of common mistakes. Many of the guidelines focus on native application development, but we can apply most parts of them to mobile web design too. Remember to provide the best possible experience on each platform. Do not deliver an iPhone experience to a BlackBerry user. Every platform has its own UI and usability guidelines that every user is expecting on your app. Exclude screens android:resizeable Indicates whether the application is resizeable for different screen sizes. This attribute is true, by default.

Dashboards Google Play Install Stats The Google Play Developer Console also provides detailed statistics about your users' devices. Those stats may help you prioritize the device profiles for which you optimize your app. This page provides information about the relative number of devices that share a certain characteristic, such as Android version or screen size. This information may help you prioritize efforts for supporting different devices by revealing which devices are active in the Android and Google Play ecosystem. This data reflects devices running the latest Google Play Store app, which is compatible with Android 2.2 and higher.

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Signing Android requires that all apps be digitally signed with a certificate before they can be installed. Android uses this certificate to identify the author of an app, and the certificate does not need to be signed by a certificate authority. Android apps often use self-signed certificates. Starting an Activity Unlike other programming paradigms in which apps are launched with a main() method, the Android system initiates code in an Activity instance by invoking specific callback methods that correspond to specific stages of its lifecycle. There is a sequence of callback methods that start up an activity and a sequence of callback methods that tear down an activity. This lesson provides an overview of the most important lifecycle methods and shows you how to handle the first lifecycle callback that creates a new instance of your activity. Understand the Lifecycle Callbacks During the life of an activity, the system calls a core set of lifecycle methods in a sequence similar to a step pyramid. That is, each stage of the activity lifecycle is a separate step on the pyramid.

Design - Metrics and Grids Devices vary not only in physical size, but also in screen density (DPI). To simplify the way you design for multiple screens, think of each device as falling into a particular size bucket and density bucket: The size buckets are handset (smaller than 600dp) and tablet (larger than or equal 600dp).

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Filters on Google Play When a user searches or browses for apps to download on Google Play, the results are filtered based on which applications are compatible with the device. For example, if an app requires a camera, Google Play would not show the app to devices that do not have a camera. This filtering helps developers manage the distribution of their apps and helps ensure the best possible experience for users. Filtering in Google Play is based on several types of app metadata and configuration settings, including manifest declarations, required libraries,architecture dependencies, and distribution controls set in the Google Play Developer Console, such as geographic targeting, pricing, and more. Google Play filtering is based in part on manifest declarations and other aspects of the Android framework, but actual filtering behaviors are distinct from the framework and are not bound to specific API levels.

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