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How to pick a co-founder

How to pick a co-founder
Naval · November 12th, 2009 Update: Also see our 40-minute interview on this topic. Picking a co-founder is your most important decision. It’s more important than your product, market, and investors. The ideal founding team is two individuals, with a history of working together, of similar age and financial standing, with mutual respect. One is good at building products and the other is good at selling them. The power of two Two is the right number — avoid the three-body problem. One founder companies can work, against the odds (hello, Mark Zuckerberg). Two founders works because unanimity is possible, there are no founder politics, interests can easily align, and founder stakes are high post-financing. Someone you have history with You wouldn’t marry someone you’d just met. One builds, one sells The best builders can prototype and perhaps even build the entire product, end-to-end. The seller doesn’t have to be a “salesman” or “business guy”. Aligned motives required Don’t settle FAQs

http://venturehacks.com/articles/pick-cofounder

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On trust, founder fall-outs, and 6 steps to getting things back on track Originally published on Venturebeat – Aug 22, 2014 Relationships are built on trust, and they require work to keep alive and well. In his book The Trust Edge, David Horsager outlines the eight pillars he believes enable trust to occur within a relationship. The eight pillars are clarity, compassion, character, competency, commitment, connection, contribution, and consistency. Original Answers To Interview Questions Throughout your career, you will participate in many, many job interviews. In all of these interviews, there are a few questions you will hear time and time again. What are your strengths? Retrospective and Evolution of Apple Ads Apple Computer Inc. was established on April 1st, 1976 and incorporated on January 3rd, 1977. Apple first started advertising its products in the late 1970s. Here’s a amazing compilation of some of Apple’s most notable advertisements from the 70s until the 2002. It’s amazing how much the Apple product line and technology in general has evolved in such a relatively short period of time. In the 80s ads were text-heavy and light on images, as were many computer and technology ads from that era.

Business Ideas for the Self Employed Several years ago, I had a lovely long-term consulting assignment which kept me both busy and solvent. One morning I woke up and realized that it was coming to an end and I had nothing lined up. After a few moments of panic, I decided to get serious about creating my next income source. I didn’t have a great deal of time to devote to this, so I gave myself the challenge of finding a way to earn $100—an easily accomplished goal.

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Startup Lessons - Having industry momentum at your back Two years ago, I partnered with an awesome CTO, Alex Lines, to start a company called Path 101. We didn’t get enough traction on the product and business to continue it fulltime, so we’re now working on it as a nights and weekends project as we take on other jobs. This is the 2nd of a series about what I learned starting up a company. First one is here. A few months ago, I wrote about the three types of deals VCs do. One thing I realized was that aside from just betting blindly on an experienced entrepreneur or funding a later stage project, was that when VCs put money into something that's innovative, they tend to do it in an innovative sector.

The Astounding Design Of Eixample, Barcelona Constructed in the early 20th century, Eixample is a district of the Spanish city of Barcelona known for the urban planning that divided the district into octagonal blocks. Influenced by a range of schools of architecture, Eixample Barcelona was designed in a grid pattern with long streets, wide avenues, and rounded street corners. Despite being in the center of a thriving European metropolis, the district provides improved living conditions for inhabitants including extensive sun light, improved ventilation, and more open green space for public use. And of course, the result from the grid-like structure is astounding from above:

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