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Resilience: The Other 21st Century Skills

Resilience: The Other 21st Century Skills
Due to the interest of my post The Other 21st Skills, I decided to individually discuss each of the skills or dispositions I proposed that are in addition to the seven survival skills as identified by Tony Wagner. This post focuses on resiliency. The first post focused on Grit: The Other 21st Century Skills. Some would categorize Grit and Resiliency as the same skill, but it is my belief they are involve two different, but interconnected, skill sets. While grit focuses on persistence, resilience is about bouncing back in the face of challenges and/or failure. Some of characteristics or dispositions of Resilience include: Bouncing BackManaging EmotionsAwareness of Strengths and AssetsPassion-Driven FocusResourcefulnessSense of Personal AgencyAbility to Reach Out to OthersProblem-Solving Skills Resilience is the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats or significant sources of stress. Resilience research clearly reveals the following key points: Like this:

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Related:  ResilienceHow To Build Resilience

The Unexpected Antidote to Procrastination - Peter Bregman by Peter Bregman | 9:00 AM May 10, 2013 A recent early morning hike in Malibu, California, led me to a beach, where I sat on a rock and watched surfers. I marveled at these courageous men and women who woke before dawn, endured freezing water, paddled through barreling waves, and even risked shark attacks, all for the sake of, maybe, catching an epic ride. After about 15 minutes, it was easy to tell the surfers apart by their style of surfing, their handling of the board, their skill, and their playfulness. Overcome Stress and Challenge: 7 Mechanisms of Resilience for High Productivity Timothy So, Msc, is a PhD candidate in Psychology in the University of Cambridge Department of Psychiatry. He is a Research Associate of Cambridge University's Well-being Institute and a Chartered Occupational Psychologist. Timothy is also responsible for both the Traditional and the Simplified Chinese PPND sites. Full bio.

How Resilience Works When I began my career in journalism—I was a reporter at a national magazine in those days—there was a man I’ll call Claus Schmidt. He was in his mid-fifties, and to my impressionable eyes, he was the quintessential newsman: cynical at times, but unrelentingly curious and full of life, and often hilariously funny in a sandpaper-dry kind of way. He churned out hard-hitting cover stories and features with a speed and elegance I could only dream of. It always astounded me that he was never promoted to managing editor. But people who knew Claus better than I did thought of him not just as a great newsman but as a quintessential survivor, someone who had endured in an environment often hostile to talent. He had lived through at least three major changes in the magazine’s leadership, losing most of his best friends and colleagues on the way.

The Art of Resilience Think you're a prisoner of a troubled childhood? Think again. You need not go through the rest of your life as an emotional cripple. Why Insecurity May Be The Key To Success Editor's Note: This story contains one of our 11 New Years resolutions you can actually keep in 2014. For the full list, click here. Maybe everything you've been led to believe about being a successful business leader is wrong.

The Neuroscience of Perseverance Perseverance separates the winners from the losers in both sports and life. Are you someone who perseveres despite difficulties and setbacks, or do you tend to throw in the towel and call it quits when faced with a challenge or adversity? What makes some people able to keep pushing and complete a task while others habitually fizzle and don't follow through? Dopamine is the fuel that keeps people motivated to persevere and achieve a goal. You have the power to increase your production of dopamine by changing your attitude and behavior. The Key to Success: 3 Emotions Highly Accomplished People Share Yesterday, the final piece of a puzzle fell into my lap, a puzzle I've been working on for the past 10 years. I've been trying to build a model for how emotions create success, but I kept on getting tripped up when I came to gratitude. I was categorizing it as a result of success or a form of success. And that didn't seem quite right, somehow. Here's the missing puzzle piece: A study soon to be published in the journal Psychological Science proves that people who are grateful are willing to wait longer for a financial reward.

The Payoff of Perseverance In the summer of 1994, in the tallest of Princeton University's ivory towers, Andrew Wiles was completing one of the most extraordinary odysseys in the history of math. For more than three decades, Wiles had been obsessed with Fermat's Last Theorem, a seemingly simple problem that had stumped mathematicians for 350 years. French mathematician Pierre de Fermat had noted that although there are plenty of solutions to the equation X2 + Y2 = Z2 (for example, 32 + 42 = 52), there is no corresponding solution if the numbers are cubed instead of squared. In fact, Fermat scribbled in the margin of a book that he had "truly marvelous" proof that the equation Xn + Yn = Zn has no solution if n is any number greater than 2.

The Brains of Successful vs. Unsuccessful People Actually Look Very Different What's the best way to take control of your own life and push yourself against boundaries? According to Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck, it's all about your mindset. Successful people tend to focus on growth, solving problems and self-improvement, while unsuccessful people think of their abilities as fixed assets and avoid challenges. Dweck says that there are two basic categories that peoples' behavioral traits tend to fall into: fixed and growth mindsets.

You're Stronger than You Think Thank you for spending some time with me at my new Psychology Today blog! It's an honor to be here, and I hope I can contribute something to the wonderful community of bloggers here. While I plan to blog on various topics, one theme I hope to revisit on occasion during my stay here is the potential within each of us, the amazing things we human beings can do when we put our minds and hearts to it. How To Be Resilient: 8 Steps To Success When Life Gets Hard “Stick with it!” “Be resilient!” “Never give up!” I see a lot of stuff about resilience, persistence and grit. What I don’t see is a lot of legitimate info on how to actually increase those qualities. How can we be more resilient?

Eight Keys to Life Hardiness and Resiliency elen Keller once wrote: “Character cannot be developed in ease and quiet. Only through experience of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened, vision cleared, ambition inspired and success achieved.” As we navigate through challenging times toward a better future, it’s useful to visit some tried and true ideas regarding life hardiness and resiliency.

How to Break Out of a Victim Mentality: 7 Powerful Tips Image by *Zara (license). “If it’s never our fault, we can’t take responsibility for it. If we can’t take responsibility for it, we’ll always be its victim.”Richard Bach “Self-pity is easily the most destructive of the nonpharmaceutical narcotics; it is addictive, gives momentary pleasure and separates the victim from reality.”John W. Perform Better Under Stress Using Self-Affirmation Can thinking about what’s important to you improve your problem-solving powers? Have a look at the following list of values and personal characteristics. If you had to pick just one, which most defines who you are and what matters to you?

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