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The One-Straw Revolution

The One-Straw Revolution
Masanobu Fukuoka (1913-2008) was a farmer and philosopher who was born and raised on the Japanese island of Shikoku. He studied plant pathology and spent several years working as a customs inspector in Yokohama. While working there, at the age of 25, he had an inspiration that changed his life. He decided to quit his job, return to his home village and put his ideas into practice by applying them to agriculture. Over the next 65 years he worked to develop a system of natural farming that demonstrated the insight he was given as a young man, believing that it could be of great benefit to the world. He did not plow his fields, used no agricultural chemicals or prepared fertilizers, did not flood his rice fields as farmers have done in Asia for centuries, and yet his yields equaled or surpassed the most productive farms in Japan. In 1975 he wrote The One-Straw Revolution, a best-selling book that described his life’s journey, his philosophy, and farming techniques.

http://www.onestrawrevolution.net/One_Straw_Revolution/One-Straw_Revolution.html

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22 trees that can be tapped for sap and syrup As winter wanes and spring approaches, wild foodists all across North America tap into the time-honored tradition of sugar production – mainly, the transformation of maple tree sap into maple syrup and sugar. This process, passed on from the Native Americans to the early settlers, is still quite popular today, and is responsible for one of the few wild foods that can be purchased commercially in most supermarkets. Most people associate syrup with the maple tree, and although much of today’s syrup does originate from the sugar maple, all species of maple can be tapped. Even better, many other trees from other genera can be tapped to extract sap, which ultimately can be turned into delicious syrup. In this post, I won’t be discussing the methods involved in tapping for sugar production.

soils majority come from weathered rock, approximately a 1/2 come from water and air, and a small portion ( less than 10%) from humus, decomposing but not decomposed organic material. Minerals derived from the soil must be dissolved in water. Otherwise the plant will not be able to obtain them. How does soil structure impact on nutrient availability? Soils are characterized by the particles which make up their texture; they may be described as clayey ( common enough in CC, or sandy ( on the eastern shore) or more ideally as loamy. Particles: Additionally, the age of the soil influences its organization.

Practical Permaculture for Home Landscapes, Your Community, and the Whole Earth by Jessi Bloom Start by marking “Practical Permaculture for Home Landscapes, Your Community, and the Whole Earth” as Want to Read: Enlarge cover Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Rate this book Clear rating Recycling animal and human dung is the key to sustainable farming © Illustrations in red & black: Diego Marmolejo for low-tech magazine. The innocent looking water closet breaks up a natural cycle in our food supply. Basically, it turns extremely valuable resources into waste products. Advancing Eco-Agriculture 1. Healthy Plants Resist Insects and Disease We understand that animals and people have an immune system that is our natural defense against pathogens. For our immune system to function properly and fulfill its purpose, it needs to be supported with the proper nutrition. If nutritional elements are lacking, or not properly balanced, the immune system’s ability to perform is compromised. This same concept holds true for plants.

What Plants Talk About They don’t have mouths, ears or even a brain, but according to some scientists, plants are talking all the time. We just need to understand their language. Once we do, we may discover that plants routinely exhibit animal-like behavior. What if, as some research indicates, they communicate with each other and their environment? Perhaps plants hunt, scream, share and nurture their young, just like members of the animal kingdom. That’s the fascinating premise behind the 53-minute documentary Nature: What Plants Talk About, an episode of the acclaimed PBS series now streaming on Netflix. The Latest Clean Energy Cocktail: Bacteria And Fungus By Jeff Spross "The Latest Clean Energy Cocktail: Bacteria And Fungus" By throwing together a common fungus and a common bacterium, researchers are producing isobutanol — a biofuel that gallon-for-gallon delivers 82 percent of gasoline’s heat energy. The more common ethanol, by contrast, only gets 67 percent of gasoline’s energy, and does more damage to pipelines and engines. And the University of Michigan research team did it using stalks and leaves from corn plants as the raw material. The fungus in question was Trichoderma reesei, which breaks down the plant materials into sugars.

How to make a bamboo polytunnel We used a local renewable material, caña (like bamboo). You could use anything long and bendy – we would like to try it with hazel next time we are further north. The only items we paid for are the plastic and string (pita string made from fibres of the giant succulent Agave plant). It took six days with four people working.

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