background preloader

How to Build Your Makerspace

How to Build Your Makerspace
Learning by making has been around since long before edtech—just think about what the adventurous explorers or intrepid settlers of yore would have thought of "Do-It-Yourself." But with thousands of kid-friendly tech tools and a whole World Wide Web of resources out there, creative, interesting opportunities for learning-by-making abound for everyone. Okay, so with all those resources, where should you start to build a makerspace? Here at EdSurge, we've rolled up our sleeves, put on our protective goggles, and built a Maker Guide from scratch, just for you. Read on for ideas from the educators and entrepreneurs who think making 24/7, including what is involved with project-based learning and making in the classroom and tried-and-true lessons from the field on starting your makerspace. Making on a budget?

https://www.edsurge.com/research/guides/how-to-build-your-makerspace

Related:  Maker EducationDesign Based ThinkingMakerSpacesPBL and STEAMMakerspaces

Expect the Miraculous A few weeks ago, Gretchen Thomas, UGA instructional technology teacher, emailed me about a possible collaboration on the UGA campus. She wanted to bring her Maker Dawgs class to the UGA Tate Center Plaza to host a popup makerspace. The idea would be to have a variety of maker tools available for UGA students to try on the spot. She wondered if I had students who might join them. edsurge Dumpster diving and dollar stores. Purse-shaped post-it's and animal lubricant. When you're building a makerspace on a budget, you learn that resources are everywhere—and they aren't always what you expect. For three years I and my fellow cofounders Kim Martin and Beth Compton, have created, developed, and run Canada’s first mobile makerspace—the MakerBus.

10 Terrific Apps and Websites for Making and DIY Even with so much technology at our fingertips, the instinct to build stuff with our hands hasn't disappeared. Instead, it's taken on a new form. Enter the "Maker" movement. Blending old-school physical building with modern digital creation, making and DIY have made a splash in the 21st-century classroom. This week, we're highlighting the best apps and websites that harness the power of technology to get kids learning through making. For project ideas, tutorials, and peer feedback, head to Make: Online and DIY websites to get inspired.

PBL and STEAM Education: A Natural Fit Both project-based learning and STEAM education (science, technology, engineering, art and math) are growing rapidly in our schools. Some schools are doing STEAM, some are doing PBL, and some are leveraging the strengths of both to do STEAM PBL. With a push for deeper learning, teaching and assessment of 21st-century skills, both PBL and STEAM help schools target rigorous learning and problem solving. They are not exactly the same, but teachers can easily connect to them to teach not only STEAM content and design challenges, but also authentic learning and public, high-quality work. What Makers Bring To Education What does the Maker movement have to offer education? One compelling idea is what some many consider to be an upside-down way to learn. Larry Rosenstock, founder of High Tech High, started me thinking about this idea in a conversation we had on project-based learning. He pointed out that most programs teach kids in advance the skills they will need to succeed at the project, but Larry believes that the students should learn the skills as part of the project - just at the moment they need them. For example, if one were to teach skills in advance for, say, scientific data collection, a teacher might show students pictures of the equipment they will use, test them on their ability to describe the function, demonstrate how to organize their data and warn them to label their axes--a somewhat mind-numbing approach. Consider instead the opposite approach--laying out the objective of the lesson, and then helping students discover what tools will help them reach their goal.

Beginner’s Guide to Maker-ize An Elementary Classroom – HonorsGradU When most penny-pinching, time-crunched, and exhausted teachers hear about lofty ideas like the MakerSpace movement in education, they are likely to dismiss it as another passing and impractical fad. However, the more we investigate, the more convinced we are that there are practical–and profoundly meaningful–ways for teachers to implement its ideals, even in an elementary school classroom. Benefits of Maker Spaces ​‘Diversity Does Not Happen By Accident’ and Other Lessons About Equity in the Maker Movement It has never been easier to hop onboard the Maker movement. In recent years, the prices of expensive tools, such as 3D printers, have dropped drastically. Project-based learning, as an alternative to the traditional lecture-based instructional approach, has won admirers among academics and teachers as a better way to help students develop 21st century skills. Today there are more makerspaces in schools, and more teachers willing to become part of this community.

Autodesk Debuts Free Maker Platform for Classrooms 21st Century Classroom Autodesk Debuts Free Maker Platform for Classrooms Autodesk has launched Project Ignite, a free open learning platform designed to give students hands-on design experience in areas such as 3D printing and electronics.

Related: