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Valve: How I Got Here, What It’s Like, and What I’m Doing

Valve: How I Got Here, What It’s Like, and What I’m Doing
It all started with Snow Crash. If I hadn’t read it and fallen in love with the idea of the Metaverse, if it hadn’t made me realize how close networked 3D was to being a reality, if I hadn’t thought I can do that, and more importantly I want to do that, I’d never have embarked on the path that eventually wound up at Valve. By 1994, I had been working at Microsoft for a couple of years. One evening that year, while my daughter was looking at books in the Little Professor bookstore on the Sammamish Plateau, I happened to notice Snow Crash on a shelf. I picked it up and started reading, decided to buy it, and wound up devouring it overnight. I also started thinking to myself that I had a pretty good idea how about 80 percent of it could work right then, and wanted to implement it as badly as I had ever wanted to do anything with a computer – I had read SF all my life, and this was a full-on chance to make SF real. I was in for a surprise. Valve is different Valve is different. Maybe you

http://blogs.valvesoftware.com/abrash/valve-how-i-got-here-what-its-like-and-what-im-doing-2/

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Why Valve? Or, what do we need corporations for and how does Valve’s management structure fit into today’s corporate world? Why Valve? Or, what do we need corporations for and how does Valve’s management structure fit into today’s corporate world? You have read Valve’s survival manual for new employees. You have read Michael Abrash’s wonderful account of working at Valve. Valve's Culture, Self-Organization and Scrum “If you don’t like change, you’re going to like irrelevance even less.” - General Eric Shinseki In the spring of 2012 Valve's New Employee Handbook was leaked. The handbook's release has led to a number of discussions about the merit of The Cabal (what Valve calls their process) and their work environment. For me, it's hard to argue with success and everything I've read about Valve being a great place to work.

How to Create an Asynchronous Multiplayer Game There’s no doubting the fact that “asynchronous” multiplayer gameplay, or the ability to play games one turn per session over the course of several days, is the new hot trend in mobile gaming. Many of the top multiplayer games are asynchronous, including the popular Words with Friends (a one-move-at-a-time implementation of Scrabble) and Draw Something (a unique take on Pictionary that was recently bought by Zynga for 200 million). When my cross-platform multiplayer game, Hero Mages, launched on iOS, I thought people would be excited by the ability to play live online battles with their friends playing on PC’s or Android devices. To my surprise, the overwhelming feedback I got was “this game would totally rock if only it had async multiplayer!” As most Hero Mages players know, I’m not one to disappoint- so I immediately restructured my priorities for the next game update to include asynchronous multiplayer.

The most interesting company in tech: Valve — Remains of the Day You hear it in technology companies all the time, especially at firms that have survived from their days as a startup to become a bigger firm: we want to remain entrepreneurial. To feel like a startup. Nimble. A place that entrepreneurs want to work. A place for builders to build (a phrase Jeff Bezos always used to describe what he wanted Amazon to be as a company). Do What You Love A good third of the mountain of mail I’ve gotten since my first post has been of the general form: “What should I study in college/learn to do/work at to get hired at Valve/have a good career/have a good life?” The most useful response I have is drawn from my own life: Do what you love. There are no guarantees, especially in the short run, about where that will lead – but at least you’ll enjoy the trip, and it is likely to lead to exciting things. It is true, however, that it can take a while; consider my own long journey to being a full-time programmer. In 1975, I was a freshman at Clark University with absolutely no idea what I wanted to do with my life.

Q&A: Card Hunter - launching an online game with a small team When Jon Chey announced the formation of Blue Manchu in 2011, the Irrational Games co-founder said he wanted to spend time on more "genre, nichey games." The studio's Card Hunter, released last month, is the manifestation of his efforts. It's a free-to-play, browser-based board and collectible card game, complete with dice rolls and a nerdy game master. That's a bit different from narrative-driven first-person shooter games like System Shock 2 and BioShock Chey worked on at Irrational. Now that a couple of weeks have gone by, Chey tells us some lessons he and his small team has learned from Card Hunter's launch, and what he might've done differently.

How To Survive A Death March I suspect that everyone reading this has worked truly insane hours at one time or another. And you've probably suffered the consequences. So as my first post for Charlie's blog, here's something slightly different: a survival guide to working insane hours, based on many years in the film industry watching dawn break from my chair in the edit suite. Whilst I've been thinking about topics for guest-posting, I've spent some time considering what writers like Charlie and moviemakers like me have in common. And one thing that sprang to mind immediately was the ubiquitous death march. I've seen Charlie go through more than a few 10,000 word a day writing sprints, and I've pulled some pretty manic stunts on that line myself.

Exclusive: Valve said to be working on 'Steam Box' gaming console with partners, could announce at GDC Recently there's been chatter that Valve — the company behind the massively popular gaming service Steam — has been considering getting into the hardware business. Specifically, there have been rumors that the company has been toying with the idea of creating a proper set-top console which could potentially pose a threat to the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3. Valve co-founder Gabe Newell even recently told Penny Arcade: "Well, if we have to sell hardware we will." At a glance that would simply be interesting fodder for a gaming forum debate, but we've uncovered information that suggests that not only has Valve been secretly working on gaming hardware for the living room, but that the company is actively pursuing a strategy which would place Steam at the center of an open gaming universe that mirrors what Google has done with Android.

Gabe Newell on what makes Valve tick Valve co-founder and CEO Gabe Newell (Andrea Peterson/Washington Post) Valve is one of the most successful video game companies in the world. The firm's online game distribution and multi-player platform Steam has 65 million users. At next week's CES conference, the company will announce hardware partners for one of its most ambitious undertakings so far: a line of gaming console alternatives running on the company's linux-based Steam OS.

Using Independent Teams to Scale: How Wooga Works Jesper Richter-Reichhelm is Head of Engineering at social games company Wooga. Here he gives an insight into the firm’s internal organization. At the end of last year, a document was published that described how Spotify works using a decentralized approach of tribes and squads. Since then, the article stuck with me. 11 Things I Wish I Knew When I Started My Business — I.M.H.O. “A lot of people like to fool you and say that you’re not smart if you never went to college, but common sense rules over everything.That’s what I learned from selling crack.”-Snoop Dogg My name is Stephanie St.Claire, and I am an unfunded entrepreneur. I’ve been in business for 4 years, after engaging in my own personal and tenuous renaissance (uh…divorce) and rediscovering my Divine Core Purpose. In other words, I grew a pair of ladyballs, launched a business, and started figuring out how to coalesce my efforts into profit.

Valve’s Gabe Newell talks wearable computers, why consoles should open up, and game ownership Gabe Newell is the co-founder and managing director of Valve. What we found during our conversation with the man himself is that those titles don't mean much of anything, and he's willing to throw his support behind whatever projects needs his help on a day to day basis. Valve has a unique structure… if you can even call it a structure.

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