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Want to Start a Makerspace at School? Tips to Get Started

Want to Start a Makerspace at School? Tips to Get Started
As the Maker Movement starts to gain momentum, schools that are trying to find ways to foster the do-it-yourself environment can learn a few lessons from another nexus in the universe: public libraries. Dale Dougherty, founding editor and publisher of Make Magazine — and the de facto leader of the Maker Movement — has a vision to create a network of libraries, museums, and schools with what he calls “makerspaces” that draw on common resources and experts in each community. Libraries and museums, he said, are easier places to incorporate makerspaces than schools, because they have more space flexibility and they’re trying to attract teens with their programs. “Schools have already got the kids,” Dougherty noted wryly, at the recent American Library Association Midwinter Meeting in Seattle. One day during the conference, dubbed Maker Monday, focused on the Maker Movement, which emphasizes learning by engaging in tech-related projects. “Why are you here?” Related

Create a school makerspace in 3 simple steps As maker education gains steam, many educators are looking for ways to incorporate making and tinkering into their schools and classrooms — often on a shoestring budget. “Kids are saying they want to learn more about technology and science, but they also want to experience it creatively and use it personally,” said Dale Dougherty, founder of Make Media, which produces Maker Faire and Make Magazine. He’ll address how educators can deliver these types of experimental learning experiences during ISTE 2014’s EdTekTalks, a provocative series of mini-keynotes from thought leaders beyond the world of ed tech. “One of the ways we can do that is create more makerspaces for kids. But what makes a makerspace? They promote learning through play and experimentation.They’re cross-disciplinary, with elements of art, science and craftsmanship.They offer tools and materials that encourage students to create rather than consume. Step 1: Secure some space. It doesn’t need to be fancy. Step 2: Put stuff in it.

3 Key Qualities for a School Makerspace Over the past year I had the privilege of leading a team to create makerspaces in 15 high schools around the Bay Area. Our goal was to learn how to help educators create makerspaces in schools and use making in the classroom. DARPA, which funded our program, eventually wanted to take what we learned and create makerspaces in 1,000 schools. While our DARPA funding ended in December, we believed so strongly in the benefits of these spaces that we continued to support our pilot schools until the end of the year. This was particularly rewarding work. Most of us have enjoyed watching someone’s eyes light up at Maker Faire, but listening to a high schooler describe his or her first open-ended project was very powerful. Every space in our program was different. Process Making requires two sets of skills and the confidence to try something new. The second set of skills can be thought of as diagnostic and problem-solving skills. The first is what we call a level I project or a skill builder.

Designing a School Makerspace Makerspaces, STEAM labs and fab labs are popping up in schools across the country. Makerspaces provide hands-on, creative ways to encourage students to design, experiment, build and invent as they deeply engage in science, engineering and tinkering. A makerspace is not solely a science lab, woodshop, computer lab or art room, but it may contain elements found in all of these familiar spaces. Therefore, it must be designed to accommodate a wide range of activities, tools and materials. Diversity and cross-pollination of activities are critical to the design, making and exploration process, and they are what set makerspaces and STEAM labs apart from single-use spaces. A possible range of activities might include: Cardboard construction Prototyping Woodworking Electronics Robotics Digital fabrication Building bicycles and kinetic machines Textiles and sewing Designing a space to accommodate such a wide range of activities is a challenging process. Ask the Right Questions Going Forward

Manufacturing Makerspaces Kids gather to make Lego robots; teens create digital music, movies, and games with computers and mixers; and students engineer new projects while adults create prototypes for small business products with laser cutters and 3D printers. Many libraries across the US have developed makerspaces—places to create, build, and craft—and they are experiencing increased visits and demand as a result. For public libraries, they are places to promote community engagement. For academic libraries, they are places where students and faculty feel welcome to do classwork and research. Fundamentally, makerspaces are a technological leap past library knitting and quilting circles, where patrons and experts have often come together to learn new techniques and train others in a skill. The ALA 2012 Virtual Conference featured two well-attended makerspace sessions. Three Makerspace Models That Work By Travis Good Tools in a library makerspace range from electronics to digital media, 3D printing, and more. 1.

Making a Makerspace: Peek Inside My Plans | attempts at using tech effectively in our classrooms On October 1st I started on my efforts toward creating a set of Makerspaces in our school district. I immediately jumped into visiting the d.school at Stanford, collecting every book I could on the topic, and applied to attend the FabLearn conference. A Makerspace has been my goal since the first day I started as STEM Coordinator last year, so when I was recently given the flexibility and permission to move forward, I jumped on the opportunity immediately. Now, what I’m going to lay out here is my vision, supported by numerous individuals, conference sessions, and books. I’ll include a list of resources I’ve referred to at the end. When I’m finished, I’m hoping you’ll have a good idea of what I’m doing and can give me some great feedback – be it the programs we use, companies I should reach out to, or something I need to fully rethink. First of all, the vision and mission of the Makerspace Collaborative: How do I plan to get there? RMC Pins Instruction for courses will come from: Like this:

Getting started The maker movement: A learning revolution By Sylvia Martinez and Gary Stager 7/21/2014 Topics: Maker movement, Project-based learning The impulse to create is one of the most basic human drives. As far back as the Stone Age, we were using materials in our environment to fashion tools for solving the problems we encountered. And in the millions of years since then, we have never stopped creating. Today, the availability of affordable constructive technology and the ability to share online has fueled the latest evolutionary spurt in this facet of human development. Welcome to the maker movement The key to the explosion of the maker movement is accessibility. In 2013, there were more than 100 Maker Faires — “the greatest show-and-tells on earth” — and Mini Maker Faires across the globe. Making in the classroom Fortunately for educators, making overlaps with the natural inclination of children to learn by doing. Constructionism. Project-based learning. The key to making is using authentic tools to create meaningful projects. Gary S.

What It Takes to Draw Low-Income Students to Afterschool Art Programs Uncategorized The Wallace Foundation went out and asked more than 200 low-income kids in seven cities what they want out of an afterschool arts program and what would keep them coming back. The study focuses on a key time in a student’s development when they’re more easily reachable, before they go to high school and may often become harder to engage. The results of the study can be found in their report, Something to Say: Success Principles for Afterschool Arts Programs from Urban Youth and Other Experts. Tweens want hands-on learning taught by professional artists and they want public spaces to perform or show their work. Wallace Foundation Related Explore: arts, infographic

Maker Movement Reinvents Education Lectures are so old school; the Maker Movement is reinventing education You’ve hit your limit of 5 free articles this month.Try our subscription options: Weekly home delivery with free shipping, access to Newsweek’s web site, and the complete online archive Access to Newsweek’s web site, and the complete online archive

How the Maker Movement Is Moving into Classrooms The Maker movement is a unique combination of artistry, circuitry, and old-fashioned craftsmanship. Certainly, learning by doing or "making" has been happening since our ancestors refined the wheel. Don’t treat making as a sidebar to an already overtaxed curriculum. [S]tudents who are thus reputedly poor in mathematics show an entirely different attitude when the problem comes from a concrete situation and is related to other interests. In 1972, Seymour Papert predicted what many complain is the state of today's apps and programs for modern students: [T]he same old teaching becomes incredibly more expensive and biased toward its dumbest parts, namely the kind of rote learning in which measurable results can be obtained by treating the children like pigeons in a Skinner box. Indeed, many of us go on first our first techno-rush as kids playing with erector sets, Legos, and the Radio Shack electronic kits. Maker classrooms are active classrooms. Society's Move Toward Making Make Magazine

What's the Maker Movement and Why Should I Care? If something is worth doing, it's worth skipping lunch for. That may not be the official motto of Tracy Rudzitis's students at The Computer School in New York City, but it might as well be. On any given day, 50 of the sixth through eighth graders gather during lunchtime in the school's "Maker Space" to design their own video games, build robots, mix squishy circuit dough on a hot plate, or sew a wearable computer. Rudzitis is the digital media teacher at M.S. 245, The Computer School. When it's not lunchtime, she teaches programming, information literacy, and design to the 350-plus middle school students. She says her experiences constantly remind her that children are capable of powerful ideas. The same type of excitement happens in Jim Tiffin's—classes at The Harley School in Rochester, New York. "When I first saw the 3D printer and the things we could make, it seemed so complicated," says Richard, who is in sixth grade at Harley. Why Make? Wearable Computers? Community Of Practice

Making Matters! How the Maker Movement Is Transforming Education By Sylvia Libow Martinez and Gary S. Stager The Maker Movement, a technological and creative learning revolution underway around the globe, has exciting and vast implications for the world of education. New tools and technology, such as 3D printing, robotics, microprocessors, wearable computing, e-textiles, “smart” materials, and programming languages are being invented at an unprecedented pace. The Maker Movement creates affordable or even free versions of these inventions, while sharing tools and ideas online to create a vibrant, collaborative community of global problem-solvers. Fortunately for teachers, the Maker Movement overlaps with the natural inclinations of children and the power of learning by doing. One might try to marginalize robotics or 3D fabrication as having nothing to do with “real” science and dismiss such activities as play or as just super-charged hobbies. Three big game-changers of the Maker Movement should be on every school’s radar: Celebrating Young Talent

Why the 'Maker Movement' is Popular in Schools The maker movement is a global, DIY movement of people who take charge of their lives, solve their own problems and share how they solved them. And it's growing in schools that are searching for more authentic learning experiences for their students. Since the beginning of time, people have made things to solve problems and otherwise improve their quality of life. But previously, the amount of exposure individual projects received was limited. Now the Internet has driven projects into the limelight. "These things that used to be isolated are now shared widely," said Sylvia Libow Martinez, president of nonprofit education technology organization Generation YES and co-author of the book Invent to Learn. She shared an example of how this global movement works. From kindergarten to second grade, students traditionally make things with playdough, legos and other objects. And parents have been telling Libow Martinez that something needs to change. What schools are doing with maker education

ReMaking Education: Designing Classroom Makerspaces for Transformative Learning The Maker movement is poised to transform learning in our schools. To counteract educational standards, testing and uniformity, this fresh approach emphasizes creation and creativity -- products and processes born from tinkering, playing, experimenting, expressing, iterating and collaborating -- and exploits new digital tools to make, share and learn across space and time, do-it-yourself (DIY) style. Museums, libraries, community centers and after-school programs have designed physical and virtual "makerspaces" to host communities of supportive peers and mentors invested in creating everything from nail polish design and webpages to jewelry and robots . . . and now, even school curriculum. Inventing Production-Centered Schools Makers, using grounded research on how students learn outside of class, are rethinking schools. Rethinking Your Classroom Like you, students need to find nurturing places in real life and on the web to geek out with others who share their passion. Maker Resources

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