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Want to Start a Makerspace at School? Tips to Get Started

Want to Start a Makerspace at School? Tips to Get Started
As the Maker Movement starts to gain momentum, schools that are trying to find ways to foster the do-it-yourself environment can learn a few lessons from another nexus in the universe: public libraries. Dale Dougherty, founding editor and publisher of Make Magazine — and the de facto leader of the Maker Movement — has a vision to create a network of libraries, museums, and schools with what he calls “makerspaces” that draw on common resources and experts in each community. Libraries and museums, he said, are easier places to incorporate makerspaces than schools, because they have more space flexibility and they’re trying to attract teens with their programs. “Schools have already got the kids,” Dougherty noted wryly, at the recent American Library Association Midwinter Meeting in Seattle. One day during the conference, dubbed Maker Monday, focused on the Maker Movement, which emphasizes learning by engaging in tech-related projects. “Why are you here?” Related

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/02/want-to-start-a-makerspace-at-school-tips-to-get-started/

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What Makes an ‘Extreme Learner’? By Jane Mount/MindShift By Linda Flanagan When Mollie Cueva-Dabkoski was dissecting a sheep’s heart during an eighth-grade science class, she had an epiphany that changed her life. “That heart told the story of anatomy and physiology!” she said. Realizing that science is best communicated through stories, Cueva-Dabkoski, now just 19 years old, went on to explore beetles in China. Creating Makerspaces in Schools Two weekends ago, I attended EdCamp NYC at The School at Columbia, an independent school on Manhattan's Upper West Side. One of the things I love about attending edcamps is that the day is always unpredictable because you don't know what will be discussed or who will be leading conversations until that morning. What ensued was an inspiring day focused on tinkering, exploration and innovation. A Day of Play and Exploration

Create a school makerspace in 3 simple steps As maker education gains steam, many educators are looking for ways to incorporate making and tinkering into their schools and classrooms — often on a shoestring budget. “Kids are saying they want to learn more about technology and science, but they also want to experience it creatively and use it personally,” said Dale Dougherty, founder of Make Media, which produces Maker Faire and Make Magazine. He’ll address how educators can deliver these types of experimental learning experiences during ISTE 2014’s EdTekTalks, a provocative series of mini-keynotes from thought leaders beyond the world of ed tech.

Transforming a School Library Into a Makerspace It’s back-to-school season! Students at Grand Center Arts Academy (GCAA), a public charter school in St. Louis, have arrived to find a portion of their library transformed into a makerspace. The GCAA Makerspace is a drop-in space for students to maximize their creative genius. Students have access before school, during study hall, at lunch, and after school to invent using a variety of electronics and workshop tools including Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Makey Makey, a MakerBot Replicator 2, and plenty of craft supplies.

3 Key Qualities for a School Makerspace Over the past year I had the privilege of leading a team to create makerspaces in 15 high schools around the Bay Area. Our goal was to learn how to help educators create makerspaces in schools and use making in the classroom. DARPA, which funded our program, eventually wanted to take what we learned and create makerspaces in 1,000 schools. While our DARPA funding ended in December, we believed so strongly in the benefits of these spaces that we continued to support our pilot schools until the end of the year. This was particularly rewarding work. Most of us have enjoyed watching someone’s eyes light up at Maker Faire, but listening to a high schooler describe his or her first open-ended project was very powerful.

Dissecting the Un-Makerspace: Recycled Learning It starts with a twist, a squeak, and a cheer. Watch out, 1980s cassette player, broken computer mouse, old monitor -- my fifth graders and I are looking for you! Your future doesn't hold a dumpster in it, at least not yet. You, my memory of past innovation, get a second life. Why? For an "un-makerspace" inspired by a journey to the Bay Area Maker Faire two years ago.

AHS Makerspace (We are located in Brisbane, Australia, so have some preference for buying nearer home. These are sellers we have used or are considering. Please comment if you find other good sources.) 3D printer Makerbot Replicator 2 Badge maker Bits and pieces Sign up for newsletter at Designing a School Makerspace Makerspaces, STEAM labs and fab labs are popping up in schools across the country. Makerspaces provide hands-on, creative ways to encourage students to design, experiment, build and invent as they deeply engage in science, engineering and tinkering. A makerspace is not solely a science lab, woodshop, computer lab or art room, but it may contain elements found in all of these familiar spaces. Therefore, it must be designed to accommodate a wide range of activities, tools and materials. Diversity and cross-pollination of activities are critical to the design, making and exploration process, and they are what set makerspaces and STEAM labs apart from single-use spaces. A possible range of activities might include:

Makerspace Resources The resources below were compiled as part of my research while writing Makerspaces: A Practical Guide for Librarians (Rowman and Littlefield, 2014). You might also be interested in the results from the Makerspaces in Libraries Survey I conducted in 2013. General Makerspace ResourcesMakerspace DirectoriesLibrary-Focused Maker ResourcesProject SitesMaker ProductsMakerspace Funding and Donation SourcesDiscussion ListsTwitter Hashtags and Folks to FollowFacebook GroupsPresentations and TalksGeneral Technology Sites and Blogs General Makerspace Resources Why Schools Need to Bring Back Shop Class Sir Ken Robinson, Ph.D, is the author of Creative Schools, The Element, Finding Your Element and Out of Our Minds. The Education Committee of the US Senate is currently considering the re-authorization of No Child Left Behind. Much of the original rhetoric in NCLB was about improving job readiness and employability.

A Roundup of How Today’s 3D Printing Technology is Progressing We are due for another technology revolution. This statement sounds ludicrous — it seems smartphones and wearable tech just began infiltrating our lives. But if you look at the history of technology revolutions, it’s clear we are approaching another world-changing innovation: Financial-Agricultural, 140 years Industrial, 60 yearsTechnical, 40 yearsScientific-Technical, 30 yearsInformation, 25 years and counting BarePaint - Greeting Card Kit - COM-11522 Description: Replacement: None. We are no longer carrying this conductive paint kit in our catalog. This page is for reference only. Bare Paint is the first non-toxic electrically conductive paint available to consumers today!

attempts at using tech effectively in our classrooms On October 1st I started on my efforts toward creating a set of Makerspaces in our school district. I immediately jumped into visiting the d.school at Stanford, collecting every book I could on the topic, and applied to attend the FabLearn conference. A Makerspace has been my goal since the first day I started as STEM Coordinator last year, so when I was recently given the flexibility and permission to move forward, I jumped on the opportunity immediately. Now, what I’m going to lay out here is my vision, supported by numerous individuals, conference sessions, and books. I’ll include a list of resources I’ve referred to at the end. When I’m finished, I’m hoping you’ll have a good idea of what I’m doing and can give me some great feedback – be it the programs we use, companies I should reach out to, or something I need to fully rethink.

21st-Century Libraries: The Learning Commons Libraries have existed since approximately 2600 BCE as an archive of recorded knowledge. From tablets and scrolls to bound books, they have cataloged resources and served as a locus of knowledge. Today, with the digitization of content and the ubiquity of the internet, information is no longer confined to printed materials accessible only in a single, physical location. Consider this: Project Gutenberg and its affiliates make over 100,000 public domain works available digitally, and Google has scanned over 30 million books through its library project.

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