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How to Set Up a Makerspace

How to Set Up a Makerspace
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Designing a School Makerspace Makerspaces, STEAM labs and fab labs are popping up in schools across the country. Makerspaces provide hands-on, creative ways to encourage students to design, experiment, build and invent as they deeply engage in science, engineering and tinkering. A makerspace is not solely a science lab, woodshop, computer lab or art room, but it may contain elements found in all of these familiar spaces. Therefore, it must be designed to accommodate a wide range of activities, tools and materials. Diversity and cross-pollination of activities are critical to the design, making and exploration process, and they are what set makerspaces and STEAM labs apart from single-use spaces. Cardboard construction Prototyping Woodworking Electronics Robotics Digital fabrication Building bicycles and kinetic machines Textiles and sewing Designing a space to accommodate such a wide range of activities is a challenging process. Some schools have chosen to incorporate makerspaces within multiple classroom spaces.

Transforming a School Library Into a Makerspace It’s back-to-school season! Students at Grand Center Arts Academy (GCAA), a public charter school in St. Louis, have arrived to find a portion of their library transformed into a makerspace. The GCAA Makerspace is a drop-in space for students to maximize their creative genius. GCAA parents & community members have been rallying behind the makerspace, even before its opening. “Makerspace provides GCAA students with unique opportunities to meld left-brain critical thinking skills with right-brained creativity and innovations to create solutions to real world problems,” said Belisle-Iffrig. Many donations of “junk drawer” items including cardboard, craft materials, and tools have been arriving. “There should be a makerspace/hackerspace in every community and in every school. Additional support is still needed for the crowdsourced Makerspace Grant Program. Follow GCAA Makerspace happenings on our blog or via Twitter @GCAAMakerspace. Parker Thomas Related

Want to Start a Makerspace at School? Tips to Get Started As the Maker Movement starts to gain momentum, schools that are trying to find ways to foster the do-it-yourself environment can learn a few lessons from another nexus in the universe: public libraries. Dale Dougherty, founding editor and publisher of Make Magazine — and the de facto leader of the Maker Movement — has a vision to create a network of libraries, museums, and schools with what he calls “makerspaces” that draw on common resources and experts in each community. Libraries and museums, he said, are easier places to incorporate makerspaces than schools, because they have more space flexibility and they’re trying to attract teens with their programs. “Schools have already got the kids,” Dougherty noted wryly, at the recent American Library Association Midwinter Meeting in Seattle. One day during the conference, dubbed Maker Monday, focused on the Maker Movement, which emphasizes learning by engaging in tech-related projects. “Why are you here?” Related

Beginners Guide Beginners Guide to Electronics by Martin T. Last updated on November 23, 2008 This book gives simplified explanations of how some electronic components work in a circuit. I first became interested in electronics when I was age 10 (as long ago as 1961). ©2008 Martin T. What's the Difference between A.C. and D.C.? How does a Resistor Work? All the colours for 5% tolerance resistors: How do Diodes Work? How do Transistors Work? Abbreviations Although we use the Greek symbol Omega W to represent “Ohms” it is frequently written as “R”. How does a Capacitor Work? What does a capacitor look like? How do Inductors Work? The Relay Bread Board and building a LED Flasher Building the LED Flasher Astable Multivibrator using two transistors

Maker Space In Education Series… 10 Sites To Start Making In The Classroom Welcome back and I sure hope you enjoyed the last article of 20 Reasons for Maker Space in Education. I hope you enjoy this post as I highlight 10 sites to possible help you to get Making in the classroom… even if in the smallest way! I encourage you to send me information and resources you think help with this idea, as I am also Making time to learn. Booking Info – Time to think about your new school year needs. Maker Space In Education Series… 10 Sites To Start Making In The Classroom – Michael Gorman ( Whle an ultimate goal might be a school Maker Space, a single teacher may wish to consider a starting place that is practical and doable. I invite you to look for that one Maker Possibility that will allow your students to make while they learn. A great starting place might be to look at some of the links I have included below to get some ideas. Makezine – This might be a great place to start. Like this: Like Loading...

Squishy Circuits Using a concentric design and resistive dough, cool parallel circuits are possible All the ingredients that you need to make your own conductive and resistive Play-Doh Wrap the dough in plastic film and store in ziploc bags to keep it moist longer Integrating LED lights and power source into a sculptural design Exploring complex circuitry becomes natural We use food coloring for conductive dough, and leave the resistive kind white, so you always know which one you're using We like to use 9V batteries. Sometimes conductive Play-Doh is just Play-Doh Troubleshooting with a partner Using the dough to make a direct connection between the battery and an LED light

A Librarian's Guide to Makerspaces: 16 Resources "There were more than 135 million adult makers, more than half of the total adult population in America, in 2015." What is a makerspace? You’ve no doubt been hearing that word more than a few times over the past several years. There were more than 135 million adult makers, more than half of the total adult population in America, in 2015. Articles & Blog Posts on Makerspaces 1.) 2.) 3.) 4.) 5.) 6.) 7.) 8.) 9.) 10. ) It all started with a training offered by the Washington State Library… Part of the “Between the Lines” series of the Washington State Library Blog, this post describes one library manager’s first encounter with STEM-based makerspace programming. 12.) Maker Faire Touted as the “greatest show and tell on earth,” Maker Faire has emerged as the official international celebration of not only creativity, resourcefulness, and innovation but also a mass gathering of the maker movement at large. Makerspaces Directories 1.) 2.) 3.) 4.) Revitalizing Community Spaces

Maker Education Initiative | Every Child a Maker Maker Space In Education Series… 20 Reasons Your Students Should Be Making It’s still summer time in the States and I couldn’t help but think of the idea of play, and that of course made me think of Maker Space. I have long encourage Making in the classroom. It wasn’t until recently that I discovered that this idea is now a movement and one that I suggest all 21st century educators Make some room for. Booking Info – Time to think about your new school year needs. Maker Space In Education Series… 20 Reasons Your Students Should Be Making – Michael Gorman ( Take a moment to contemplate what it would be like if every school had a Maker Space and it was part of the school curriculum. As you are probably already aware, there is a growing Maker Movement across the nation. The idea behind the Makers Movement includes allowing people to imagine, envision, create, innovate, play, formatively learn, experiment, collaborate, share, and most of all dream of possibilities. Like this: Like Loading...

Makey Makey Invention Kit for Everyone Make + Key = Makey Makey Would you enjoy playing a game of PacMan with carrots or tinkering with a set of play dough piano keys? If the answer is “yes,” then Makey Makey might be just the toy for you! I’ve been following Makey Makey by JoyLabz for a while and we finally got the chance to play with our very own set. That’s a great question — before we brought ours home I wasn’t entirely sure either! Makey Makey is an easy-to-use invention kit that’s essentially a printed circuit board that connects to a computer via a USB cable. Basically, Makey Makey takes over the functionality of the space bar and other computer keys, and the conductive objects become the computer’s new keys! One more thing: Do you see my daughter holding one end of the black wire in the photo (above)? That tidy little green kit you see there is filled with a few important supplies: Makey Makey board with 18 key-press connections and one ground connection7 alligator clips6 white wires1 USB cableBasic instructions

Makerspace Resources The resources below were compiled as part of my research while writing Makerspaces: A Practical Guide for Librarians (Rowman and Littlefield, 2014). You might also be interested in the results from the Makerspaces in Libraries Survey I conducted in 2013. General Makerspace ResourcesMakerspace DirectoriesLibrary-Focused Maker ResourcesProject SitesMaker ProductsMakerspace Funding and Donation SourcesDiscussion ListsTwitter Hashtags and Folks to FollowFacebook GroupsGeneral Technology Sites and Blogs General Makerspace Resources Make:: The website for Make: magazine contains a blog, videos, project information, and links to the other Maker Media sites. Maker book lists: A series of maker book lists created by Meredith Nelson, Johnson County Public Library, organized by age and by type of making. Maker Movement Manifesto: Chapter 1 - Mark Hatch, 2014. Maker Faire: Advertises maker faires and provides information on taking part in them. Makerspace Directories Hackerspaces MIT's Fab Lab List.

Bubble Machine These are the tools and materials that I used for my bubble machine. Yours will differ greatly depending on what you have available. This is a great project to do with scraps, and odds and ends all hacked together. It doesn't have to look amazing to be a lot of fun, it just has to work. To make it easier for others to reproduce this, I've done away with my normal format of exactly what to use and instead broken it down into the five main components the machine's made from. The 5 steps after this talk about what alternatives you could use and what each has to do to make a great bubble machine. Trough: To hold the bubble solution. Bubble Ring: A ring of holes that will spin slowly through the trough picking up the bubble solution. Motion: A slowly moving motor to spin the bubble ring. Blower: Something with a bit of puff. Power: A power source or two for the blower and spinner. You'll also need nuts, bolts, hot glue or superglue to hold everything together.

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