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Famous Scientists Who Believed in God

Famous Scientists Who Believed in God

http://www.godandscience.org/apologetics/sciencefaith.html

Related:  Dieu, la raison et la scienceNatural Sciences

Scientific publishing: Peer review, unmasked : Nature To read this story in full you will need to login or make a payment (see right). Nature 416, 258-260 (21 March 2002) | doi:10.1038/416258a Scientific publishing: Peer review, unmasked Syncretism Syncretism /ˈsɪŋkrətɪzəm/ is the combining of different, often seemingly contradictory beliefs, while melding practices of various schools of thought. Syncretism involves the merger and analogizing of several originally discrete traditions, especially in the theology and mythology of religion, thus asserting an underlying unity and allowing for an inclusive approach to other faiths. Syncretism also occurs commonly in expressions of arts and culture (known as eclecticism) as well as politics (syncretic politics).

Thomas Kuhn: the man who changed the way the world looked at science Fifty years ago this month, one of the most influential books of the 20th century was published by the University of Chicago Press. Many if not most lay people have probably never heard of its author, Thomas Kuhn, or of his book, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, but their thinking has almost certainly been influenced by his ideas. The litmus test is whether you've ever heard or used the term "paradigm shift", which is probably the most used – and abused – term in contemporary discussions of organisational change and intellectual progress. A Google search for it returns more than 10 million hits, for example. And it currently turns up inside no fewer than 18,300 of the books marketed by Amazon.

Relatively Interesting Astrology and Horoscopes Debunked Over 2300 years ago, the Babylonians came up with the idea that the gods lived among the stars and other celestial objects, and were able to impose their will on humanity by controlling the destinies of individuals and nations alike. The Babylonians divided the sky into 12 “slices”: which we now know as the signs of the zodiac… Taurus, Pisces, etc. There are many variations of astrology, but they are all founded upon the idea that celestial objects can influence a person’s personality and destiny. Today, according to a Gallup poll, 25% of American believes in Astrology. The Ancient Chinese Libertarian Tradition - Murray N. Rothbard The first libertarian intellectual was Lao-tzu, the founder of Taoism. Little is known about his life, but apparently he was a personal acquaintance of Confucius in the late sixth century BC and like the latter came from the state of Sung and was descended from the lower aristocracy of the Yin dynasty. Unlike the notable apologist for the rule of philosopher-bureaucrats, however, Lao-tzu developed a radical libertarian creed. For Lao-tzu the individual and his happiness was the key unit and goal of society.

English Is the Language of Science. That Isn't Always a Good Thing Thirteen years ago, a deadly strain of avian flu known as H5N1 was tearing through Asia's bird populations. In January 2004, Chinese scientists reported that pigs too had become infected with the virus—an alarming development, since pigs are susceptible to human viruses and could potentially act as a "mixing vessel" that would allow the virus to jump to humans. "Urgent attention should be paid to the pandemic preparedness of these two subtypes of influenza," the scientists wrote in their study.

Ancient_wisdom.html Come, put your mundane concerns aside for awhile and cross the threshold to explore the Wisdom of the Ages. Click on above banner for catalog and order information This site is an ongoing project which will be updated regularly-- new material will be added on a continuing basis. Last Update: 5/04/05 We welcome and invite your comments, suggestions and requests. WHICH NOBEL PRIZE WINNERS BELIEVED IN GOD? NOBELISTS WHO BELIEVED IN GOD The book, 50 NOBEL LAUREATES AND OTHER GREAT SCIENTISTS WHO BELIEVE IN GOD, comprises religious quotations from the most influential scientists and writers in the world. In the course of my 11-year research I have studied hundreds of books, articles and letters - primarily those found in the archives of the National Library of Bulgaria (Sofia), Biblioteca Comunale di Milano and the Austrian National Library (Vienna). I have also corresponded with many contemporary Nobel Prize-winning scientists who have shared their personal beliefs about God. I believe that this book will inspire believers, will give hope to seekers and that it will challenge those who think that religion and contemporary science are in insurmountable conflict. Tihomir Dimitrov, tih777dim@yahoo.com 1.

Remarkable New Theory Says There's No Gravity, No Dark Matter, and Einstein Was Wrong Gravity is something all of us are familiar with from our first childhood experiences. You drop something - it falls. And the way physicists have described gravity has also been pretty consistent - it’s considered one of the four main forces or “interactions” of nature and how it works has been described by Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity all the way back in 1915. But Professor Erik Verlinde, an expert in string theory from the University of Amsterdam and the Delta Institute of Theoretical Physics, thinks that gravity is not a fundamental force of nature because it's not always there. Instead it’s “emergent” - coming into existence from changes in microscopic bits of information in the structure of spacetime.

Internet Resources for the Study of Judaism and Christianity This page lists a number of sites on the Internet that are useful for the study of Judaism and Christianity. The list is necessarily partial, provisional, and even parochial. A casual glance will show how Penn-centered it is. It is amazing that this much relevant information already exists on the Internet. 'Eat mutton': Indian newspaper's 'scientific' tips for conceiving boys A south Indian newspaper has offered its readers “scientifically proven” advice on how to conceive a boy, including eating plenty of mutton, never skipping breakfast and always sleeping with your face turned leftwards. The advice, which ran on Tuesday in the Kerala newspaper Mangalam, highlights the deep-rooted and often deadly preference for male children that persists in Indian culture. Admitting its methods might not be guaranteed to work, the column suggested that women looking to conceive boys needed to ensure they never missed breakfast, and ate much more than their normal intake throughout the day. Mutton and dry grapes were the best food for women, while men needed to avoid eating food with high acid content, it said.

Chapter One: Your Mind is Your Religion by Lama Thubten Yeshe When I talk about mind, I’m not just talking about my mind, my trip. I’m talking about the mind of each and every universal living being. The way we live, the way we think—everything is dedicated to material pleasure. We consider sense objects to be of utmost importance and materialistically devote ourselves to whatever makes us happy, famous or popular. Even though all this comes from our mind, we are so totally preoccupied by external objects that we never look within, we never question why we find them so interesting. As long as we exist, our mind is an inseparable part of us.

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