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Blind artist envisions the world through hypnotizing animated gifs

Blind artist envisions the world through hypnotizing animated gifs
sep 09, 2015 blind artist envisions the world through hypnotizing animated gifs blind artist envisions the world through hypnotizing animated gifsall gifs courtesy of george redhawk artist george redhawk has turned a loss into a gift — after the artist became legally blind, he began to explore the realm of photo manipulation with a desire to show the world as he sees it from his damaged sight. through the use of computer softwares that aide the visually impaired, redhawk — who works under the name darkangeløne — has realized the ongoing series of animations titled, ‘the world through my eyes’. original digital art ‘the remains of a memory’ by adam martinakis / animation by george redhawk ‘to create most of my gifs, I am using a photo morphing software which I have been experimenting with, and perfecting over several years‘, redhawk tells graphic art news. animation by george redhawk sculpture ‘cairn’ by celeste roberge / animation by george redhawk nina azzarello I designboom

http://www.designboom.com/art/blind-artist-george-redhawk-animated-gifs-09-09-2015/

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