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Biology: Free Stanford Course by Robert Sapolsky

Biology: Free Stanford Course by Robert Sapolsky
First thing you need to know: Before doing anything else, you should simply click “play” and start watching the video above. It doesn’t take long for Robert Sapolsky, one of Stanford’s finest teachers, to pull you right into his course. Better to watch him than listen to me. Second thing to know: Sapolsky is a MacArthur Fellow, a world renowned neurobiologist, and an adept science writer best known for his book, Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers. Much of his research focuses on the interplay between the mind and body (how biology affects the mind, and the mind, the body), and that relationship lies at the heart of this course called “Human Behavioral Biology.” Now the third: Human Behavioral Biology is available on YouTube and iTunes for free. Related Content: Robert Sapolsky Breaks Down Depression Dopamine Jackpot!

http://www.openculture.com/2011/03/freesapolskycourse.html

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Natural selection Natural selection Natural selection is one of the basic mechanisms of evolution, along with mutation, migration, and genetic drift. Darwin's grand idea of evolution by natural selection is relatively simple but often misunderstood. To find out how it works, imagine a population of beetles: Monophyletic, Paraphyletic, Polyphyletic defined 17th July 2003 Question What do terms like monophyletic, paraphyletic and polyphyletic mean? Answer These terms are used to describe groupings of organisms, and indicate the extent to which they can be considered as ``natural groups''. They are best explained using examples, so consider the following family-tree diagram:

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The Language Learner’s NOT To Do List To do lists seem like a good idea in theory, but they have one major disadvantage: there is an infinite number of potential to do items. With this in mind, Timothy Ferriss, best-selling author of The 4-Hour Workweek (and a speaker of 6 languages), recommends “not to do lists” instead. Since they isolate a finite set of behaviors that are getting between you and your goals, they are far more effective than traditional to do lists. This tool applies perfectly to language learning, where most learners waste a lot of time on ineffective methods and bad materials.

Complicity and the Brain: Dynamics in Attractor Space Dr. Peter Henningsen peter@alifegames.com Abstract: How do I find the number of protons, electrons and neutrons that are in an atom of...? How many protons, electrons and neutrons are in an atom of krypton, carbon, oxygen, neon, silver, gold, etc...? To find the number of protons, electrons and neutrons in an atom, just follow these easy steps: Step 1 - Gather Information

Over 20 Free Digital Classroom Tools… Customize… Plus No Log In This is a site that you are bound to find useful in your classroom. The tools are incredible and may even include items you have used on paper in the past… but can now bring digitally into the 21st century! Before this informative journey encompassing some engaging resources please take a moment and sign up by email or RSS. I enjoy sharing and I am also motivated by knowing that I am making a difference for you. Help Wanted. No Smokers Need Apply: A New Marketplace Podcast Kai RYSSDAL: Time now for a little Freakonomics Radio. It’s that moment every couple of weeks we talk to Stephen Dubner, the co-author of the books and blog of the same name. It is “the hidden side of everything.”

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