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Five fingers of evolution - Paul Andersen

Five fingers of evolution - Paul Andersen
In his talk, Paul Andersen explains the five causes of microevolution. Research one example for each cause in the human population. Use the following population simulator to simulate microevolution: Run the simulation using the default settings. Note the change in gene frequencies due to chance. Reset the simulation and increase the population size to 200. Run the simulation again and note the change in gene frequencies due to chance.

http://ed.ted.com/lessons/five-fingers-of-evolution

Related:  Evolution/BiologyLife

Diseases - Manual - Activity 3, page 1 At a Glance Focus: Students investigate the growth of bacteria in the presence of antibiotics and use the results to explain a case of antibiotic-resistant tuberculosis, presented in an Internet-based interview. Major Concepts: The re-emergence of some diseases can be explained by evolution of the infectious agent (for example, mutations in bacterial genes that confer resistance to antibiotics used to treat the diseases). Objectives: After completing this activity, students will be able to explain how antibiotic treatment results in populations of bacteria that are largely resistant to the antibiotic and describe inappropriate and/or questionable uses of antibiotics. Prerequisite Knowledge: Students should be familiar with bacterial growth and with evolution by natural selection.

The Cronin Group Recent Publications 284. Assembly and core transformation properties of two tetrahedral clusters: [FeIII13P8W60O227(OH)15(H2O)2]30- and [FeIII13P8W60O224(OH)12(PO4)4]33-, P. I. Believe in Ohio STEM videos The Believe in Ohio program invites high school and college students, their instructors and the community to take a virtual field trip into the innovation economy of the future that is being built in Ohio through a series of six, free, regionalized, online courses. What this course is about and why is it important? Our nation is being challenged on an unprecedented level to maintain its historic prosperity. In the face of this challenge, over the last decade, the State of Ohio and its regions have been building Ohio’s innovation economy of the future.

PCR Primers are short pieces of DNA that are made in a laboratory. Since they're custom built, primers can have any sequence of nucleotides you'd like. In a PCR experiment, two primers are designed to match to the segment of DNA you want to copy. Through complementary base pairing, one primer attaches to the top strand at one end of your segment of interest, and the other primer attaches to the bottom strand at the other end. Life Science Learning Goals Which skull is a lizard and which is a snake? During this session, you will have an opportunity to build understandings to help you: Define what is meant by “species.” Describe how new species evolve as a result of variation and adaptation through natural selection.

The Observer Life looks increasingly like a chemical experiment that took over the laboratory. All living things turn to dust and ashes when they die, or, to put it another way, to constituent atoms and molecules of hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, phosphorus and so on. But, in another sense, living things do not die: they begin again, from a tiny cell, and scavenge the dust, the air and water, to find the elements necessary to fashion an aspidistra, an elephant, or an attorney-general, using only the raw materials to hand and energy from a thermonuclear reactor 93 million miles away. The freshly minted, self-replicating organism then grows up, grows old and melts away, but not before imparting a fragment of itself to generate yet another copy, but not an identical copy. The process is visible and transparent, everywhere on the planet, but it is ultimately mysterious.

Transitional forms Transitional forms Fossils or organisms that show the intermediate states between an ancestral form and that of its descendants are referred to as transitional forms. There are numerous examples of transitional forms in the fossil record, providing an abundance of evidence for change over time. Inorganic Biology Image credit: colourdance.deviantart.com One of the most burning and perplexing questions in biology today is: just what is life? While on the surface it seems obvious, the line between life and non-life is much blurrier than it seems. At the microscopic level, it becomes nearly impossible to distinguish the processes of life from other chemical reactions that are going on around us all the time. The mascot for this debate is the humble virus. There is a large degree of disagreement about what exactly viruses are.

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