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Culture - Fashion victims: History’s most dangerous trends

Culture - Fashion victims: History’s most dangerous trends
Giving new meaning to the phrase ‘fashion victim’, a 35-year-old Australian woman had to be cut out of a pair of skinny jeans after developing a condition called compartment syndrome. It’s not the first time someone has succumbed to a dangerous style trend: “They’ve always been around, since the Stone Ages,” says Summer Strevens, the author of Fashionably Fatal. “It’s when fashion is taken to an extreme; I call it vanity insanity.” Here are five of the deadliest fads in history. Corsets The undergarment that shrank waistlines long before Spanx had an influence on language as much as women’s bodies: it spawned the term ‘strait-laced’, lending a Victorian respectability to its wearer, as well as ‘loose women’ – implying that those who were corset-less had morals as free as their lacing. Crinoline fires The structured petticoat did more than just enhance a silhouette. Stiff collars Invented in the 19th Century, the detachable collar meant men didn’t have to change their shirt every day.

http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20150624-when-fashion-kills

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10 Influential Fashion Designers You’ve Probably Never Heard Of It’s curious to wonder why some designer’s legacies are preserved and others fall to the wayside. Is it the lack of PR, no heir to the design house or were they just bad designers? While certain designers of the past are remembered today for their ingenuity or are attributed with the "invention" of a particular garment, such as Mary Quant and the miniskirt, scores of designers--like Redfern, Lucile or Mainbocher--who were widely influential in their time have seemingly been forgotten. The task of resurrecting these legacies thus falls upon the fashion historian, so sit back for a mini fashion history lesson of 10 fashion designers you've probably never heard of but should definitely know. For more fashion history by Part Nouveau, click here.

Luxury Brands Must Develop Their Customer Experience To Survive Luxury retailers must focus on providing a rounded customer experience, rather than simply flogging goods, if they are to survive the ongoing recession. According to a new report by The Future Laboratory, commissioned by the property company Grosvenor, has found there are five key areas luxury brands must improve to keep their customers happy. 1) Providing one-on-one experiences 2) Micro-events that are highly tailored to suit VIP shoppers, larger community moments that are shared via digital tools and clever event management. These events are now about much more than pop-up and publicity; they will be highly tailored to suit VIP shoppers.

Refugee Crisis: 'One In 50 Could Be ISIS Radicals', David Cameron Warned Islamic State could be sending jihadis out of Syria posing as refugees, a Lebanese government minister has warned. Education minister Elias Bou Saab suggested that as many as 2% - one in 50 – of the refugees could be “radicals”, which he said would be “more than enough” to cause problems. Saab spoke to journalists travelling with David Cameron on a visit to Lebanon and Jordan, during which the Prime Minister highlighted Britain’s contribution of more than £1 billion to support refugee camps for displaced Syrians to stay in the region.

25 Women Designers Who Changed Fashion Forever The upcoming Costume Institute exhibit and Monday's Met Ball honors two of fashion's most beloved women designers: Elsa Schiaparelli and Miuccia Prada. But what about the other female names that have helped to change fashion forever? Recently, Style.com's Nicole Phelps noted that in New York fashion today there is a surprising lack of big-name female designers, which begged the question: "Is it easier to succeed in New York fashion as a man?"

Japan zoo makes wild fashion statement A Japanese zoo has taken the catwalk to a wild new level, using some of its fiercest inhabitants to rip and claw jeans to a fashionably distressed look. The facility northeast of Tokyo has unveiled 'Zoo Jeans', styled by the fangs and claws of lions, tigers and bears. Zoo officials said the material held up well, all things considered. 'We wrapped several pieces of denim around tyres and other toys. Zendaya schools the world on cultural appropriation In a new interview Zendaya has weighed in on the heated subject of cultural appropriation. It’s a topic that keeps rearing its head, both in the media and on Twitter – whether it’s a conversation about M.I.A.’s new video or Kylie Jenner’s cornrows. Speaking with Nylon, the 18-year-old singer and actress stressed that there’s a difference between appreciating and appropriating other cultures.

Luxury brands must redefine the way they do business There were times when China was the holy grail for global retailers. Logo-obsessed Chinese buyers seeking opulence were armed with cash fresh from the economic boom. Luxury retail brands flocked to the new market, with the result of 35% of sales for brands such as Omega, Harry Winston and Balmain coming from Greater China, according to estimates by Exane BNP Paribas. The region is responsible for a whooping 25% of sales at Burberry and 20% of sales at Prada. UK retail sales volumes dip in June - BBC News UK retail sales volumes fell unexpectedly by 0.2% in June, after consumers bought fewer household goods, and less food and petrol. The figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) also showed the annual rate of sales growth slowed to 4.0% last month from 4.7% in May. That was the slowest annual growth rate since September 2014, and was below analysts' forecasts. However, the ONS said the annual growth rate was still "strong". Sales volumes in the April-to-June quarter were up 0.7% from the previous quarter. The value of online sales in June increased by 1.4% compared with May and accounted for 12.4% of all retail sales.

The fashion business - BBC News Image copyright AFP We know that clothing is big business, but it may be surprising just how big. The fashion industry's contribution to the British economy is an estimated £26bn - that's twice the size of the car industry's and nearly as big as the contribution from housing, according to the British Fashion Council.

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