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The Book Surgeon (15 pieces)

The Book Surgeon (15 pieces)
Using knives, tweezers and surgical tools, Brian Dettmer carves one page at a time. Nothing inside the out-of-date encyclopedias, medical journals, illustration books, or dictionaries is relocated or implanted, only removed. Dettmer manipulates the pages and spines to form the shape of his sculptures. He also folds, bends, rolls, and stacks multiple books to create completely original sculptural forms. "My work is a collaboration with the existing material and its past creators and the completed pieces expose new relationships of the book’s internal elements exactly where they have been since their original conception," he says. "The richness and depth of the book is universally respected yet often undiscovered as the monopoly of the form and relevance of the information fades over time. Dettmer is originally from Chicago, where he studied at Columbia College. Update: Read our exclusive interview with the Book Surgeon here. Brian Dettmer's website

http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/the-book-surgeon-15-pieces

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3D Paintings on Panes of Glass Using multiple layers of clear glass, Canada based David Spriggs and Chinese born Xia Xiaowan, transform flat artwork into 3D sculptures. Viewers are treated to different shifting perspectives of the works based on where they stand in the art space. Spriggs work revolves around powerful explosive imagery, often resembling storms, cosmic blasts or firework like explosions. Xiawan’s “spatial paintings,” which often feature distorted figures, are drawn individually using colored pencil on tinted glass. Paleofuture - Paleofuture Blog - City of the Future Postcards (circa 1910) Leominster in the Future (postcard circa 1910) At the turn of the 20th century, the postcard seemed to be a popular medium with which to imagine the future. While these depictions were often tongue-in-cheek they, like the Jetsons in the 1960s, held some kernel of truth about society's expectations for what was to come. We see in these two cards some things we might obviously expect like flying machines, subways, cars and monorail trains. The postcards however, also illustrate things that we take for granted today, such as a department of sewers building.

The Art of Negative Space. on the Behance Network Sign Up Log In The Art of Negative Space. Project Featured On: Behance.net — 7/13/2011 Wacom Gallery — 12/8/2013 Lackadaisy Expressions Boy, I didn't know what I was getting myself into when I started this. I've had requests for some sort of expressions tutorial dating back a while now, so I figured, "Sure! I can explain expression drawing...and it'll be way better than all those tutorials out there that are nothing but charts of generic expressions. Yeah! Just give me a day or two to whip something up..." Um.

Fascinating Lamps by Calabarte Calabarte is the pseudonym of a Polish artist named Przemek Krawczynski, whose art takes on a peculiar but incredibly beautiful form: cool lamps. The name itself is a portmanteau of two words – art (obviously), and calabash, the fruit that carries his imagination. The calabash is a bottle gourd originating in India, although Calabarte gets his supply from Senegal. Due to ancient domestication and usage, the bottle gourd has an incredibly tough outer shell. In the past, the gourd’s usage was defined mostly as a water container, due to having a tough, smooth shell with an ergonomic shape for handling, and natural buoyancy on water. Nevertheless, it’s edible both raw and cooked, and used in various cuisines.

Simple Ideas That Are Borderline Genius Looking for more about [term]? Simple Ideas That Are Borderline Genius part 2 Simple Ideas That Are Borderline Genius part 3 Simple Ideas That Are Borderline Genius part 4 Simple Ideas That Are Borderline Genius part 5 Top LICHTENSTEIN In the Car In the Car (sometimes Driving)[1] is a 1963 pop art painting by Roy Lichtenstein. The smaller, older of the two versions of this painting formerly held the record for highest auction price for a Lichtenstein painting. The larger version has been in the collection of the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art in Edinburgh since 1980.[2][3][4] Background[edit] Details[edit] After 1963, Lichtenstein's comics-based women "look hard, crisp, brittle, and uniformly modish in appearance, as if they all came out of the same pot of makeup."

Paper Cuts Izziyana Suhaimi We’ve been seeing a lot of embroidered art as of late but I must say that so far, I’ve been most impressed by Singaporean artist Izziyana Suhaimi‘s work. I can’t get over how skillfully she is able […] Earth from Above a collection of aerial photography "Earth From Above" is the result of the aerial photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand's five-year airborne odyssey across six continents. It's a spectacular presentation of large scale photographs of astonishing natural landscapes. Every stunning aerial photograph tells a story about our changing planet.

Anamorphic Drawings: Hidden Images Revealed Fresh Visual Daily Anamorphic Drawings: Hidden Images Revealed Thursday 03.10.2011 , Posted by Paul Caridad List of cognitive biases Illustration by John Manoogian III (jm3).[1] Cognitive biases can be organized into four categories: biases that arise from too much information, not enough meaning, the need to act quickly, and the limits of memory. Cognitive biases are tendencies to think in certain ways that can lead to systematic deviations from a standard of rationality or good judgment, and are often studied in psychology and behavioral economics. There are also controversies over some of these biases as to whether they count as useless or irrational, or whether they result in useful attitudes or behavior. For example, when getting to know others, people tend to ask leading questions which seem biased towards confirming their assumptions about the person.

Paper Art - 100 Extraordinary Examples of Paper Art Paper art can be traced back to Japan, where it originated over a thousand years ago. From complex paper cutting to book carving, this is an ever expanding area of design that is hardly talked about. These intricate paper designs grace museums and exauhibitions throughout the world and is becoming yet another exciting medium of expression for many designers. Some of the artists featured here use simple materials, such as A4 printing papeel, while others resort to unexpected materials, such as actual books, as their prime materials. Sheep Sculptures Made Out of Rotary Phones Jean-Luc Cornec’s Sheep Sculptures from the Museum of Telecommunication in Frankfurt. (via ThisBlogRules) Earth Hour 2011 - Alan Taylor - In Focus Last Saturday, March 26, people and businesses around the world participated in Earth Hour 2011, turning off their lights at 8:30 p.m. local time. Earth Hour was organized by the World Wildlife Fund in 2007, as a way to bring attention to energy-consumption, sustainability, and climate change issues. This year, participants in 134 countries darkened homes, skyscrapers, and landmarks around the world. The images below (starting with photo number two) are interactive -- click on each image to "turn off the lights" (For wider screens, be sure to click the "1280px" option at right.) [25 photo pairs] Use j/k keys or ←/→ to navigate Choose: This combo of photos shows the Seoul N Tower before (left) and after (right) the lights were turned off for Earth Hour in Seoul, South Korea, on March 26, 2011.

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