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I Write Like

I Write Like
Check which famous writer you write like with this statistical analysis tool, which analyzes your word choice and writing style and compares them with those of the famous writers. Any text in English will do: your latest blog post, journal entry, comment, chapter of your unfinished book, etc. For reliable results paste at least a few paragraphs (not tweets). Paste your text here: The program doesn't store or use your input for any other purposes.

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Related:  Language, Words, & Meaning

Words People Commonly Misuse - Words That People Say Wrong - The Real Definition of Literally 10. Electrocute What you think it means: To receive an electric shockWhat it actually means: A severe injury or death as a result of an electric shock Being electrocuted means you are in some serious shit: like, either dead or close to it. No, your desk lamp doesn't electrocute you every time you touch it. That's just a shock. Five Documentaries You NEED To Watch On Netflix As Of 11/13/13 Documentaries offer you something very few fictional films can. You walk away from them smarter than you were when you showed up. That is how documentaries work. They often find a single subject, and focus their energy on informing those who don’t seem to know enough about it. While it is oft misunderstood that horror films are my favorite, they are a close second, but documentaries take the cake for me. If you went through my Netflix account right now, you would see that I have given five-star ratings to documentaries far more than any genre of film on there.

50 Awesome Open Source Resources for Writers and Writing Majors With the popularity of blogging and online journals, writers working in the online realm have a growing number of opportunities all the time to practice and refine their craft, and maybe even get paid for it. And if you’re a writing major, why not take advantage of all the opportunities to get great free and open source resources that can help you to write, edit and organize your work? Here’s a list of fifty open source tools that you can use to make your writing even better. Word Processors Language Arts Interactives Sheppard Software's Language Arts page features a variety of games for different grade levels. Elementary students (and anyone who needs a refresher) can play the animated grammar and punctuation games, which review basic punctuation and grammar concepts. This section is continually being refined and expanded, so check back often!

59 Quick Slang Phrases From The 1920s We Should Start Using Again Get ready to “know your onions,” readers. If you’ve ever wanted to talk like characters from an old movie or the folks from The Great Gatsby, now’s your chance. For the twenties lovers among us, here are 59 of the era’s best slang phrases. Now you just have to practice talking really, really fast. 1. Ankle: to walk 150 Resources to Help You Write Better, Faster, and More Persuasively It doesn’t matter if you’re a student or a professional writer: there’s always something new to learn and ways to make your writing more refined, better researched, and more effective. Writing is essential for students who want to succeed, whether they’re enrolled in one of the top online colleges or an Ivy League university. As essential as it is, learning to write well isn’t easy. The best practices for writing and research can sometimes be subjective, and the finer points of syntax and style often take a backseat to looming deadlines and strict citation guidelines. Luckily, there are many helpful resources that make it easier to build on your existing skills while learning new ones.

Printing Press The interactive Printing Press is designed to assist students in creating newspapers, brochures, and flyers. Teachers and students can choose from several templates to publish class newspapers, informational brochures, and flyers announcing class events. Text added to the templates can be modified using a simple WYSIWYG editor, which allows students to choose text features, such as font size and color. Documentation for the Printing Press includes instructions for using the tool. Customized versions of the tool, which include additional instructions and more focused choices, are included with some lessons.

Irony - Examples and Definition of Irony Irony Definition Irony is a figure of speech in which words are used in such a way that their intended meaning is different from the actual meaning of the words. It may also be a situation that may end up in quite a different way than what is generally anticipated. In simple words, it is a difference between the appearance and the reality. Types of Irony On the grounds of the above definition, we distinguish two basic kinds of irony i.e. verbal irony and situational irony.

month: "2008-10" Joker in a Dress The Halloween store clerk looked surprised when I asked for a non-slutty nurse costume. tags: halloween surprise costume nurse [add] 2008-10-30 22:14:28 / Rating: 650.25 / As the actor dressed in the Minnie costume stepped on my sandaled four-year old foot after I asked for an autograph I never received, I realized that Disneyland was not "The Happiest Place on Earth" after all. tags: humor childhood disneyland minnie mouse [add] The Thirty-Six Dramatic Situations The Thirty-Six Dramatic Situations is a descriptive list which was created by Georges Polti to categorize every dramatic situation that might occur in a story or performance. To do this Polti analyzed classical Greek texts, plus classical and contemporaneous French works. He also analyzed a handful of non-French authors. In his introduction, Polti claims to be continuing the work of Carlo Gozzi, who also identified 36 situations. Publication history[edit] “Gozzi maintained that there can be but thirty-six tragic situations.

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