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Taking the Mystery Out of Copyright

Taking the Mystery Out of Copyright
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Related:  Copyright and Fair UseCopyright for K-12 LibrariansCopyrights and Wrongs and Fair UselhunleyPersonal Learning Network

How to Identify Mysterious Images Online Can’t figure out the source of an image you found online? There’s an easy trick you might not know about — and it’s an essential tool for citing sources. Students who find images they want to use in projects need to follow the appropriate rules of citation: state the title and the original source. But with so much misinformation and mis-attribution online, students might either change the research topic to avoid the problem altogether or simply cite the source poorly. Take, for example, a student wanting to use this image (above) labeled as a cartoon by Rube Goldberg. Since he wants to use it in a project, he must find the original source of the image, but when he tries looking through Rube Goldberg’s illustrations of absurd, overly-complex machines, the artistic style looks different.

About Want to let people share and use your photographs, but not allow companies to sell them?Looking for access to course materials from the world’s top universities?Want to encourage readers to re-publish your blog posts, as long as they give you credit?Looking for songs that you can use and remix, royalty-free? If you answered yes to any of the questions above, then you should learn more about Creative Commons. Probably the quickest and easiest introduction to CC is to watch the following short video:

Download & Streaming : Moving Image Archive by Internet Archive collection eye Connections, Not Consequences I was recently at an intermediate school observing the classrooms of teachers who had signed up for assistance in working with one or more of their difficult students. As expected, I saw a range of inappropriate behaviors among the kids I was asked to observe, including Keegan wandering around the room, Carlton with his head on the desk, Shaleesha and Louisa bickering over a pencil, and Manny making squeaky noises. Later on, I met with each of five teachers to discuss their concerns and explore strategies. While every teacher had no trouble reciting a litany of these students' disruptive behaviors, I was amazed that, three months into the school year, not one was able to tell me any of the students' favorite out-of-school interest, hobby, or activity. Hiding my shock, I suggested that it might be a good idea to engage each student to discover these things so that, going forward, they might be better prepared to reach out and connect in a positive way.

Page 2 This awesome self-assessment was created by some awesome people in the State of California was adapted from the Technology Skills Matrix for students. Essentially, the idea is that “if students are to know these skills in various areas of technology at different grade levels, teachers and administrators should be proficient as well. This assessment can be … Continue reading UPDATE: Congratulations to Ashley Mucha, the winner of this Kindle giveaway!

So… You Want (Have) To Create Something? Image licensed under Creative Commons by Nancy Sims – No doubt, the issue of copyright in the age of CREATING is of utmost importance. Where can you get the images, audio and video you need in order to create and remix for projects, homework and your own interests and passions? Step1: Become aware and understand different copyright licenses. Step 2: What is Creative Commons?

Copyright for Librarians and Teachers, in a Nutshell You may have wondered whether you hold the copyright to work you’ve put many hours into creating on the job. Who holds the copyright to works created by teachers or librarians? Short answer: In general, when employees create works as a condition of employment, the copyright holder is the employer. Netlabels : Free Music : Free Audio : Download & Streaming by Clinical Archives collection eye "CLINICAL ARCHIVES IS ABOUT EXPANDING THE DEFINITION OF MUSIC" This is independent netlabel for eclectic and illogical music. The basic directions : abstract, avant-garde, alternative, indie, intuitive improvisation, free improv, jazz, fusion, electronic jazz, free jazz, funk, jam band, live electronic, experimental, experimental pop, dark disco, contemporary, manipulation, neo-classicism, illbient, ambient, musique concrète, noise, tape music, minimalism, acousmatic music, sound... Topic: Clinical Archives

Google for Educators: The Best Features for Busy Teachers Among all the links and downloads out there, it can be hard for teachers to know which ones work best. Google has made it easier by creating Google for Educators, which compiles some of the search engine's most useful features in one place. Whether you're teaching Spanish or social studies, mathematics or music, there's a free Google feature that will make your lessons more dynamic and your projects more organized. The lively, informative website offers step-by-step visual tours and even videos to help you get set up. Below are some of the most useful features that the site has to offer. Google Search

10 Must Have Resources to Teach about Copyright and Fair Use 1- Copyright Advisory Network This web site is a way for librarians to learn about copyright and seek feedback and advice from fellow librarians and copyright specialists 2- Copyright and Fair Use Guidelines for Teachers

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