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Copyright and Fair Use - UMUC Library

Copyright and Fair Use - UMUC Library
Disclaimer The information presented here is only general information. Legal advice must be provided in the course of an attorney-client relationship specifically with reference to all the facts of the particular situation under consideration. Such is not the case here, and accordingly, the information presented here must not be relied on as a substitute for obtaining legal advice from a licensed attorney. Updated January 28, 2011 Consistent with BOR Policy IV-3.20, the UMUC Library has developed guidelines for the use of copyrighted materials. The UMUC Library addresses copyright and intellectual property issues because of its role in teaching and promoting information literacy. An Introduction to Copyright What Is Copyright? What Can be Copyrighted? Tangible, original expressions can be copyrighted. Fixation: The item must be fixed in some way. What Cannot be Copyrighted? Works in the public domain: Ideas are in the public domain. What Does Copyright Protect? Top An Introduction to Fair Use

Avoiding Plagiarism Summary: There are few intellectual offenses more serious than plagiarism in academic and professional contexts. This resource offers advice on how to avoid plagiarism in your work. Contributors:Karl Stolley, Allen Brizee, Joshua M. PaizLast Edited: 2014-10-10 09:01:36 Research-based writing in American institutions, both educational and corporate, is filled with rules that writers, particularly beginners, aren't aware of or don't know how to follow. While some rhetorical traditions may not insist so heavily on documenting sources of words, ideas, images, sounds, etc., American academic rhetorical tradition does. (Purdue University students will want to make sure that they are familiar with Purdue's official academic dishonesty policy as well as any additional policies that their instructors have implemented.) Intellectual challenges in American academic writing There are some intellectual challenges that all students are faced with when writing.

Choose a License This work is licensed under the Creative Commons LICENSE_NAME License. To view a copy of this license, visit LICENSE_URL. We are currently testing a new version of the License Chooser. Please consider using the Chooser beta, and leave us feedback on how we can improve. Creative Commons is a non-profit organization. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet... About earlier versions The most recent license version is 4.0, which can be used internationally. If your jurisdiction is not on this list, or if you want to use the latest version of the licenses instead of a ported license, you can return to the 4.0 license chooser. The most recent license version is 4.0, which can be used internationally. Allow adaptations of your work to be shared? Yes The licensor permits others to copy, distribute, display, and perform the work, as well as make and distribute derivative works based on it. Yes, as long as others share alike No Allow commercial uses of your work? Selected License Approved for Free Cultural Works Offline

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) Family Policy Compliance Office (FPCO) Home The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education. FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children's education records. Parents or eligible students have the right to inspect and review the student's education records maintained by the school. Schools may disclose, without consent, "directory" information such as a student's name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, honors and awards, and dates of attendance. For additional information, you may call 1-800-USA-LEARN (1-800-872-5327) (voice). Or you may contact us at the following address:

WebQuest Overview | Materials | Workshop Hotlist | Workshop Outline | Additional Resources | Standards | Credits & Thanks Overview This one-hour workshop is intended to give high school students: an introduction to the issue of plagiarism, an overview of copyright laws and fair use provisions a demonstration of techniques to avoid plagiarism, focusing on paraphrasing, quoting, and citing sources. Presented here as an outline, this workshop can be expanded or contracted to meet time constraints, and student interest, concern, or grade level. Materials Needed Workshop Hotlist Bookmark the Internet sites to be accessed in advance or project this hotlist during the workshop itself. I. II. III. IV. V. VI. Workshop Outline I. Copyright Lesson Plan by Laura Kaemming This online lesson plan was designed for 8th grade students to be implemented over the course of several days. Copyright Worksheet Distribute worksheet to students as they enter. II. Project the website. III.

Fair use guidelines for educational multimedia Fair use guidelines for educational multimedia These guidelines were developed during the CONFU process. For a full explanation of their status, see Confu: The conference on fair use. 1. Introduction 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Appendix A: Organizations Endorsing These Guidelines Appendix B: Organizations Participating in Development of These Guidelines 1.1 Preamble Fair use is a legal principle that defines the limitations on the exclusive rights** of copyright holders. There is no simple test to determine what is fair use. While only the courts can authoritatively determine whether a particular use is fair use, these guidelines represent the participants'**** consensus of conditions under which fair use should generally apply and examples of when permission is required. The limitations and conditions set forth in these guidelines do not apply to works in the public domain--such as U.S. **See Section 106 of the Copyright Act. ***The Copyright Act of 1976, as amended, is codified at 17 U.S.C.

Background Information - Open Educational Resources - UMUC Subject Resources at University of Maryland University College OERs started as a grassroots movement by educators worldwide. Funded by grants and private donations (particularly from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, which has already given more than $110 million in support of OERs), the OER movement has attempted to bring into the educational process groups who have been traditionally shut out, including K-12 teachers, scientists and engineers working in the industry rather than in academia, and those who aren’t fluent in English. The OER movement’s goal is to make education available to everyone around the world (particularly those in the developing world, who could not otherwise afford an education, as well as self-learners). The OER movement has become an institutional movement as well, with early pioneers such as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology putting an increasing amount of course material – including complete course lectures – online.

Plagiarism: How to Avoid It Avoiding Plagiarism According to the definition given in the 1997 New Webster's Encyclopedic Dictionary of the English Language , plagiarism is "the unauthorized use of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one's own" (508). To avoid plagiarism, all students must document sources properly using Footnotes, Endnotes, or Parenthetical References, and must write a Bibliography, References, or Works Cited page and place it at the end of the research paper to list the sources used. Of the three ways to document sources - Footnotes, Endnotes, and Parenthetical References, the simplest is using Parenthetical References, sometimes referred to as Parenthetical Documentation or Parenthetical Citations. Check to see which type of documentation is preferred by your teacher. Do not be tempted to get someone else to write your research paper, hand in the same essay to two or more different teachers, or purchase instant essays from the Web. º Avoiding Plagiarism .

The Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education Click here to view or download a PDF of this report. Coordinated by: The Media Education Lab,Temple UniversityThe Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property,American University Washington College of LawThe Center for Media & Social Impact,American University With funding from: The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation And additional support from: The Ford Foundation,by way of the Future of Public Media Project Introduction Principles of Fair Use in Media Literacy Education 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Conclusion Common Myths About Fair Use Notes What This Is This document is a code of best practices that helps educators using media literacy concepts and techniques to interpret the copyright doctrine of fair use. What This Isn't This code of best practices does not tell you the limits of fair use rights. It’s not a guide to using material that people give the public permission to use, such as works covered by Creative Commons licenses. How This Document Was Created Media Literacy Education

Stanford Copyright and Fair Use Center Privacy Policy Privacy Statement Harvard Business School understands that the privacy of its users is important. To that end, we have adopted the following policy with regard to the collection, use, and dissemination of personal information requested from visitors to this site. Personal information is information associated with a user's name or personal identity. We are providing this policy below so that you may understand the terms and conditions associated with the provision of any personal information to us. Please note, however, that this policy has been developed with the recognition that Internet technologies continue to develop and evolve rapidly, and that such changes may require us to alter our Privacy Policy. General Statement You may visit our website without identifying yourself or revealing any personal information. Personal Information Collected and Use of Information We do not intentionally collect personally identifiable information about children age 13 or younger. Cookies

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