background preloader

Picdrome Public Domain Copyright-Free Pictures

Picdrome Public Domain Copyright-Free Pictures

http://www.picdrome.com/page/gallery

Related:  Banco de IMAGENESImage ToolsCopyrights and Wrongs and Fair Usekittyaj

MulticolorEngine MulticolorEngine gives you the ability to search your images using colors as a search parameter. You are familiar with searching using keywords: you provide a keyword to a search engine and it replies with a list of search results that include that keyword. With MulticolorEngine, your search query is one or more colors and the results are images that contain your query colors. Download & Streaming : Moving Image Archive by Internet Archive collection eye You are invited to view or upload your videos to the Community collection. Common Sense (pamphlet) Common Sense[1] is a pamphlet written by Thomas Paine in 1775–76 that inspired people in the Thirteen Colonies to declare and fight for independence from Great Britain in the summer of 1776. In clear, simple language it explained the advantages of and the need for immediate independence. It was published anonymously on January 10, 1776, at the beginning of the American Revolution and became an immediate sensation. It was sold and distributed widely and read aloud at taverns and meeting places. Washington had it read to all his troops, which at the time had surrounded the British army in Boston. In proportion to the population of the colonies at that time (2.5 million), it had the largest sale and circulation of any book published in American history.[2]

ClipArt ETC: Free Educational Illustrations for Classroom Use Alphabets The Alphabets ClipArt collection offers 1,193 illustrations arranged in 43 galleries including decorative letters and numerals, complete alphabet sets, and several sign language systems. If you are looking… American History and Government Netlabels : Free Music : Free Audio : Download & Streaming by Clinical Archives collection eye United States Constitution The Constitution was adopted on September 17, 1787, by the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and ratified by conventions in eleven States. It went into effect on March 4, 1789.[2] Since the Constitution was adopted, it has been amended twenty-seven times. The first ten amendments (along with two others that were not ratified at the time) were proposed by Congress on September 25, 1789, and were ratified by the necessary three-fourths of the States on December 15, 1791.[3] These first ten amendments are known as the Bill of Rights. The Constitution is interpreted, supplemented, and implemented by a large body of constitutional law.

The Complete Guide to Image Blender Photo Editing App In this tutorial you’re going to learn everything you need to know about Image Blender photo app. While there are many similar layer and masking apps, none of them can beat Blender in terms of simplicity. If the whole idea of layers and masks scares you, Blender is the perfect app to start with. 3-D Printers: Understanding Copyright, Fair Use, and More Libraries have been on the front lines of the digital revolution since its beginning. 3-D printing is the latest wave of this revolution, which continues to fundamentally change the way we access, process, and produce information. This technology brings digitization to the physical marketplace for the first time, by allowing people of all ages to use digital processes to create tangible items that can be used, traded, bought and sold. It promises progress across numerous industries and sectors.

Founding Fathers of the United States Terminology[edit] Within the large group known as the "Founding Fathers", there are two key subsets, those who signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776 and those who framed the Constitution in 1787. A further subset includes those who signed the Articles of Confederation.[1] Some historians define the "Founding Fathers" to mean a larger group, including not only the Signers and the Framers but also all those who, whether as politicians, jurists, statesmen, soldiers, diplomats, or ordinary citizens, took part in winning American independence and creating the United States of America.[2] Historian Richard B. Morris in 1973 identified the following seven figures as the key Founding Fathers: John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and George Washington.[3] Three of these (Hamilton, Madison and Jay) were authors of the The Federalist Papers, advocating ratification of the Constitution. Background[edit]

Copyright: Will We Always Be Behind the Times? I dusted off my copyright presentation the other day, getting ready to talk to a journalism class full of juniors. The task the teacher and I were hoping to accomplish was to help the students better understand copyright and the use of digital images in their online blog magazine publications. As I prepared, just for fun, I pulled the books on copyright that I have as resources for staff in our professional collection. I am embarrassed to tell you that the first thing I found was NEA’s Copyright Primer for Librarians and Educators from 1995! I then proudly pulled out Copyright Clarity by Renee Hobbs only to discover that it is already almost six years old! This jarred me into thinking, once again, how rapidly digital creation tools evolve and how, just as rapidly, we need to revisit how we think about copyright.

Related: