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A Fair(y) Use Tale

A Fair(y) Use Tale

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CJn_jC4FNDo

Related:  Week 4: Digital Leadership and Information EthicsCopyrights and Wrongs and Fair Use

Best practices for attribution You can use CC-licensed materials as long as you follow the license conditions. One condition of all CC licenses is attribution. Here are some good (and not so good) examples of attribution. Note: If you want to learn how to mark your own material with a CC license go here. Can I Use that Picture? The Terms, Laws, and Ethics for Using Copyrighted Images – The Visual Communication Guy: Design, Writing, and Teaching Resources All in One Place! Need to use an image but not sure if you have the legal and ethical right to do so? Understanding the laws for using images can be a bit tricky, especially because there is wiggle room within the laws. And, with the mass distribution of images on the internet, it’s no wonder we’re all asking the the same question over and over again: can I use that picture? Whether for your business presentation, your school project, or your organization’s brochure, you’ve likely placed in images to make your designs more visually appealing. But did you use the images according to legal and ethical standards?

Copyright & Fair Use - Fair Use Fair use is a copyright principle based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. For example, if you wish to criticize a novelist, you should have the freedom to quote a portion of the novelist’s work without asking permission. Absent this freedom, copyright owners could stifle any negative comments about their work. Unfortunately, if the copyright owner disagrees with your fair use interpretation, the dispute may have to be resolved by a lawsuit or arbitration.

The right stuff: Teaching kids about copyright We (rightfully) spend significant time and energy teaching kids to be aware of their digital footprints. Stories abound about momentary lapses of judgment leading to loss of employment or scholarships. Students tend to embrace these lessons because they care about reputation. Obviously, we must continue these important lessons; however, we must realize that digital citizenship encompasses other online behavior, too. I’m talking about teaching kids about copyright. It can be hard to get moral compasses to twitch when discussing the intricacies of copyright law, public domain, fair use, and Creative Commons.

What New Research on Teens and Social Media Means for Teachers As teachers, we all have assumptions -- and likely some opinions -– about teenagers and social media. But are those assumptions correct? Well, now we have research to help us find out. This week, Common Sense is releasing its latest research report, Social Media, Social Life: Teens Reveal Their Experiences, a deep dive into the social media habits of American teenagers. Created for Learning: When can I use someone else's images in my resources? We were lucky enough that a connection of ours landed us a free chat with a big trademark/copyright attorney in Southern California. We talked about these things with him. We learned that you can use images from films as long as... you create your own derivative work...and/or...you only use as much as you reasonably need to use...and/or...you do not use critical/spoiler portions of the creative work...and/or...you don't compete with their intended market...and/or...you use it in instructive and not decorative ways.ACCEPTABLE USE: Example: Someone could create a Powerpoint that includes short video clips from films for the class to discuss the use of lighting or sound editing or character motives or etc.Example: Someone could use multiple small quotes from the text.Example: Someone could start with someone else's artwork and transform it drastically enough that it is no longer that work or in competition with that work.

Copyright Laws for Teachers: Educational CyberPlayGround™ CITE - the Educational CyberPlayGround, Inc. AS YOUR SOURCE. ( ISTC 301/501 Resources ) Definition of Copyright: "The legal right granted to an author, a composer, a playwright, a publisher, or a distributor to exclusive publication, production, sale, or distribution of a literary, musical, dramatic, or artistic work.

4 Great Lesson Plans on Copyright Many kids -- and even adults -- don't fully understand the power of copyright law. As we all know, the internet makes it extremely easy to use other people's work without permission. But access to all this content also gives us incredible opportunities for creation and critical thinking. Helping your students understand the nuances of copyright law, the doctrine of fair use, public domain, and Creative Commons licenses can support their development as critical, creative digital citizens. Young kids understand respect and fairness, and copyright at its most basic level can be explained in these terms. With older students, in addition to focusing on what qualifies as plagiarism, you can introduce the complexities of copyright, including the doctrine of fair use, which gives students the right to remix and critique media.

Fair Use - Copyright for Libraries - LibGuides at American Library Association Please note that ALA cannot give legal advice. If you need legal advice, you should contact an intellectual property attorney. The Fair Use Doctrine provides for limited use of copyrighted materials for educational and research purposes without permission from the owners. Copyright: Will We Always Be Behind the Times? I dusted off my copyright presentation the other day, getting ready to talk to a journalism class full of juniors. The task the teacher and I were hoping to accomplish was to help the students better understand copyright and the use of digital images in their online blog magazine publications. As I prepared, just for fun, I pulled the books on copyright that I have as resources for staff in our professional collection.

This is a light-hearted and comical video that uses Disney characters and movies to teach students about intellectual property and fair use of material. by janeschmude Apr 23

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