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The Educator's Guide to Copyright and Fair Use

The Educator's Guide to Copyright and Fair Use
A five-part series When it comes to copyright law and the application of fair use exceptions, ignorance is definitely not bliss! Learn how to educate yourselves and your students and avoid making a costly mistake! You really did plan to find time over the summer to familiarize yourself with the latest information on copyright law. You absolutely intended to look up the fair use guidelines for using technology resources. You truly meant to create a classroom copyright policy, locate agencies that grant permissions to use copyrighted materials, write a template for a permission request form, and locate sites to teach students about the value of original work and the societal benefits of obeying copyright laws. What's an educator to do? Click Part 1: Copyrights and Copying Wrongs below to begin. Who Said That? Article by Linda Starr Education World® Copyright © Education World

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Related:  Copyrights and Wrongs and Fair UseTeacher Resources

Teaching Copyright As today's tech-savvy teens become increasingly involved with technology and the Internet for learning, work, civic engagement, and entertainment, it is vital to ensure that they understand their legal rights and responsibilities under copyright law and also how the law affects creativity and innovation. This curriculum is designed to give teachers a comprehensive set of tools to educate students about copyright while incorporating activities that exercise a variety of learning skills. Lesson topics include: the history of copyright law; the relationship between copyright and innovation; fair use and its relationship to remix culture; peer-to-peer file sharing; and the interests of the stakeholders that ultimately affect how copyright is interpreted by copyright owners, consumers, courts, lawmakers, and technology innovators. Unit Goals

U.S. Copyright Office U.S. Copyright Office Fair Use Index Welcome to the U.S. Copyright Office Fair Use Index. Collection Connections - Literature and Poetry - Themed Resources Historical context and ideas for integrating individual digital collections of primary sources into instruction. American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936-1940 (Summary and Teaching Resources) The life histories, in combination with fictional novels, can engage students in the study of themes such as loss of innocence, consequences of failure, or corruption and its consequences. American Women: A Gateway to Library of Congress Resources for the Study of Women's History and Culture in the United States (Summary Only) Search this collection using the terms "author", "poet" or "literature".

Copyright for Educators Copyright for Educators is a series of videos designed to help educators learn about what they can and can’t do within the category of “Teaching” in the Copyright Act. Under the Copyright Act, there is nothing more intriguing and exciting for educators than Fair Use. Fair Use is the concept that if you are doing something for the greater good of society, like teaching, then your needs supersede the ownership rights of the copyright holder under the Copyright Act. Teachers, and by association, students, can legally use music, websites, videos, images, and a wealth of copyrighted materials for the purposes of teaching, that wouldn’t be accessible otherwise. Still a bit intimidated?

Five-Minute Film Festival: Copyright and Fair Use for Educators I absolutely love it when teachers and students create, remix, and mash up media; it's a fantastic way to encourage deeper learning and media literacy. But one issue that complicates digital freedom of expression is copyright law. While many would argue that copyright law is outdated and badly in need of an overhaul, it's still critical that adults and kids alike have a basic understanding of what's legal and ethical while playing with other people's intellectual property. Here's a list of videos I collected to help you navigate the murky waters of copyright law in educational settings. Video Playlist: Understanding Copyright and Fair Use

After 10 Years, Google Books Is Legal On Friday, a federal circuit court made clear that Google Books is legal. A three-judge panel on the Second Circuit ruled decisively for the software giant against the Authors Guild, a professional group of published writers which had alleged Google’s scanning of library books and displaying of free “snippets” online violated its members’s copyright. To some digital-rights followers, the Google Books case had seemed to drag on forever: The Authors Guild first filed suit 10 years ago.

- Themed Resources Exhibitions, special presentations, lesson plans and other materials gathered from throughout the Library of Congress for selected curricular themes. Abraham LincolnExplore the life of the sixteenth president of the U.S. through photographs, his correspondence, speeches and expert commentary from the Library of Congress. AdvertisingThe rise of consumer culture traced through branding and product information. Asian Pacific AmericansOfficial documents, newspapers, photos, poems, maps, images, and Webcasts chronicle the experiences and accomplishments of Asian Americans in the United States. BaseballCulture, change and history, including Jackie Robinson's groundbreaking role, through baseball cards, songs, and historical documents.

English Literature terms, Glossary of Literary Terminology from Literature-Study-Online & Bookshop Abstract Expressionism A form of art in which the artist expresses himself purely through the use of form and colour. It is non-representational, or non-objective, art, which means that there are no concrete objects represented. It was one of the first purely American art movements and is usually associated with New York in the 1940s - ‘60s. In terms of art history, the movement can be broadly divided into two groups: action painters such as Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning who put the focus on the physical action involved in painting, and colour field painters such as Kenneth Noland and Mark Rothko who were primarily concerned with exploring the effect of pure colour on a canvas. Abstract Expressionism is closely linked to several literary movements, particularly Imagism and Postmodernism.

The Educator’s Guide to Copyright, Fair Use, and Creative Commons – The Edublogger The Edublogs support team regularly receives complaints and official requests to remove copyrighted content that users have placed on blogs. The legal jargon with respect to digital copyrights can be confusing – especially since different countries have their own laws and regulations. Understanding digital copyright is an essential skill we need to understand and teach our students. With this post, we hope to dispel a few myths and pull together a complete list of resources for teachers and students to use when blogging and working with content online. This post was originally written by Ronnie Burt, on the Edublogger, on Feb, 2012. It’s been re-written with content and comments from the original post combined with updated content by Sue Waters.

Fair Use Scenarios The principles and limitations [of Fair Use] are designed to guide your reasoning and to help you guide the reasoning of others. "The Code of Best Practices in Fair Use" Center for Media & Social Impact It's long been my contention that you can't "teach" values. The best someone can do is create situations that help people define or refine their own values derived from information, conversation and reflection. To this end, I've always used "scenarios" anytime I work with others on questions of ethics (and online safety).

Copyright and Primary Sources How do I use the Restriction Statements that accompany the American Memory collections? The Library of Congress assesses materials for legal considerations prior to placing items online (see legal assessment). The Restriction Statement that accompanies each American Memory collection provides known information regarding ownership of materials in the collection. If known, we include contacts for permission. In some cases the Restriction Statement will indicate that material in a particular collection may be used freely; in other cases the Restriction Statement may only be a starting point for your inquiry. What is copyright?

a Program of the National Park Service Featured this month: Civics in America Happy 2016! At the start of this election year, Teaching with Historic Places is highlighting its lessons about Civics in America. Copyright for teachers Copyright: Definition According to the U.S. Copyright Office, copyright is "a form of protection grounded in the U.S. A Copyright-Friendly Toolkit However fabulous Creative Commons and Public Domain content may be, sometimes you really need to use copyrighted material. Say you plan to comment on popular media or current events. For instance, you may be planning to critique the portrayal of Native Americans in commercial films. You are going to want to “quote” some commercial films like Pocahontas, Lone Ranger, and Dances with Wolves. If you are reviewing a book, you may want to share its cover art. You may use copyrighted content without asking permission if you believe that your use falls under the doctrine known as Fair Use.

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