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Positive Attitude

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Sometimes it takes the words of others to soothe our own soul.

Could Thinking Positively Be Dangerous Right Now? - Michelle McQuaid. If, like me, you’ve started opening the newspapers each day with a sense of dread and disbelief about that latest actions of President Trump and his administration, it can be hard to figure out exactly what you’re meant to do with these feelings.

Could Thinking Positively Be Dangerous Right Now? - Michelle McQuaid

Should you be protesting loudly? Trying to trust the checks and balances of government? Think Twice Before Overdoing The Positive Thinking, Cautions Psychology Study. The unexpected negative effect of positive thinking on mental health.

Think Twice Before Overdoing The Positive Thinking, Cautions Psychology Study

Dreaming about positive events in the future makes you feel better now, but may make you feel worse later on, new research finds. The more positively people fantasised about the future, the more depressive symptoms people experienced up to seven months later, the study found. The findings kick against the ubiquitous self-help advice to ‘think positive’. Professor Gabriele Oettingen, who led the research ,said: “Our findings suggest that as pleasurable and helpful as positive fantasies are for depressive mood in the moment, they can be problematic and cumbersome over time.”

The reason for the dangerous effect of positive fantasies may be down to lack of effort. People who fantasise about the future tend to put less effort in when tomorrow becomes today. As I’ve written previously in Success! It’s expectations that matter more than fantasies, as I wrote in the same article: The new study’s authors write: Related articles: Are You a Negaholic? 5 Ways Pessimism Is Ruining Your Life. Norman Vincent Peale published The Power of Positive Thinking in 1952.

Are You a Negaholic? 5 Ways Pessimism Is Ruining Your Life

But it’s only more recently that we’re learning about the destructive power of negative thinking. Courtesy of iStock/IPGGutenbergUKLtd A few years ago, an author cornered me at a publishing conference to complain about his agent, gripe about his publicist, and grumble about his publisher. It was beyond awkward. I tried to change the subject, but he persisted. Maybe you’ve had a similar experience. Why Does Pessimism Sound So Smart? "For reasons I have never understood, people like to hear that the world is going to hell," historian Deirdre N.

Why Does Pessimism Sound So Smart?

McCloskey told the New York Times this week. Benefit Finding: The Science Behind How to Be Positive. Source: PicJumbo.

Benefit Finding: The Science Behind How to Be Positive

In 2006, Michael McCullough and his colleagues from the University of Miami conducted an experiment that changed the way we think about positive thinking. [1] They asked over 300 undergraduates to choose a negative event in their lives, such as when someone had hurt or offended them. The students all came out with something that had been troubling them.

Some had been abandoned, while others had been cheated on, insulted, or rejected. A third of the participants were then asked to spend a few minutes describing the incident in detail. A second group was asked to do the same thing, however, they were asked to focus on the benefit that had come from the experience, such as becoming a stronger or more experienced person. How a Shift in Your Vocabulary Can Instantly Change Your Attitude. This past year I have noticed how my vocabulary impacts my attitude.

How a Shift in Your Vocabulary Can Instantly Change Your Attitude

Words have power. "Always Look On The Bright Side Of Life" - Eric Idle. “I Am a Lovable Person!”: Why Positive Mantras Backfire For Some. The positive mantra has long been a staple of self-help books.

“I Am a Lovable Person!”: Why Positive Mantras Backfire For Some

According to many self-help books, the idea is simple and intuitive: repeating “I am lovable,” or “I am confident,” will move a person towards these states. According to psychological research, though, these statements don’t work for everyone and, for some, may even backfire (Wood et al., 2009). Canadian psychologist Joanne V. Wood and colleagues decided to test the effects of what they term ‘positive self-statements’.

First they wanted to see how many people used these kinds of statements. A survey of 249 undergraduates showed that the majority used them from time-to-time and even more frequently during stressful period, like before exams. Next, the researchers wanted to see what kind of effect these self-statements had on people’s self-esteem. Participants were asked to repeat “I am a lovable person,” and their self-esteem was measured before and afterwards. This probably happens because the mind is not that easily tricked. “Positive Attitude” Bullshit: On the dangers of “radical self-love” – Posse. There is an endless supply of people who are ready and willing to inform us about what we are doing wrong, and how we can alter our behaviour so we can get ahead and inject magic and happiness into our lives.

“Positive Attitude” Bullshit: On the dangers of “radical self-love” – Posse.

Between modern day guru Gala Darling who believes “positive thoughts generate positive realities,” and you can “manifest” your own destiny, to capitalist public thinkers such as Oprah Winfrey telling us positive thinking can help us obtain “the sweet life,” it is easy to get misled into a muddle of mistruths. A recent blog by Gala is entitled “Happiness is simple: why too many choices make us miserable and 5 ways to improve your life!” Yeah? Nah. Too many choices are not the issue for a huge majority of the political underclass; a lack of choice is exactly the problem.

Gala and magazines such as Oprah Winfrey’s O Magazine, tell us: RSA Animate - Smile or Die.