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A Simple Exercise to Increase Well-Being and Lower Depression from Martin Seligman, Founding Father of Positive Psychology

A Simple Exercise to Increase Well-Being and Lower Depression from Martin Seligman, Founding Father of Positive Psychology
by Maria Popova You’ll need pen, paper, and a silencer for cynicism. “When [a man] has fair health, a fair fortune, a tidy conscience and a complete exemption from embarrassing relatives,” Henry James wrote in his diary, “I suppose he is bound, in delicacy, to write himself happy.” More than a mere philosophical contemplation, however, James’s observation presages the findings of modern psychology in the quest to reverse-engineer the art-science of happiness. No one has addressed the eternal question of what begets happiness with more rigor and empirical dedication than Dr. Martin Seligman, founding father of Positive Psychology — a movement premised on countering the traditional “disease model” of psychology, which focuses on how to relieve suffering rather than how to amplify well-being. Close your eyes. This somewhat self-consciousness-inducing exercise, Seligman promises, will make you happier and less depressed a mere month from now. He then offers his empirically tested antidote:

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2014/02/18/martin-seligman-gratitude-visit-three-blessings/

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