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Anglo-Saxon clothes - women

Anglo-Saxon clothes - women
5th to 7th centuries Women wore an under-dress of linen or wool with long sleeves and a draw-string neck. Sleeves were fastened with clasps for wealthier women, or drawn together with braid or string for poorer women. The outer dress was a tube of material, rather like a pinafore, and often called a ‘peplos’. A pair of shoulder-brooches or clasps held this onto the under-dress. A belt was worn, from which various accessories were hung. There is some linguistic evidence that shawls were worn, as well as cloaks, which were fastened either centrally or to the right shoulder with a brooch. 7th to 9th centuries Shoulder-brooches and wrist-clasps went out of fashion, and the sleeves of the over-dress now came to just below elbow-length on the arms and calf-length around the legs. 10th to 11th centuries The under-dress was now often pleated or folded, while the sleeves of the over-dress tended to flare towards the wrist.

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Anglo-Saxon clothes - men 5th and 6th centuries Men wore wool or linen hip-length undershirts with long sleeves, and probably loin-cloths. Woollen trousers were held up with a belt threaded through loops. A tunic was pulled over the head, and reached down to the knees. It was usually decorated at the wrists, neck and hem, and was long-sleeved. A belt was worn at the waist, often with a decorated buckle and strap-end. Anglo Saxons Houses and Saxon villages We know what Saxons houses may have looked like from excavations of Anglo Saxon villages, such as the one at West Stow in the east of England. Here, an early Anglo-Saxon village (c.420-650AD) has been carefully reconstructed where it was excavated. Using clues from the what was discovered, archeologists have reconstructed the houses as they may have looked about 1,500 years ago. We know that the Saxons built mainly in wood, although some of their stone churches remain.

Anglo Saxon life - Food and Drink The Anglo-Saxons loved eating and drinking and would often have feasts in the Hall. The food was cooked over the fire in the middle of the house; meat was roasted and eaten with bread. They drank ale and mead - a kind of beer made sweet with honey - from great goblets and drinking horns. After the feast a minstrel would play a harp and sing songs of battles and heroes. Anglo-Saxon Clothes and Jewellery An Anglo-Saxon lady wore: a loose gown fastened round her waist with a girdle;a full-length, sleeved tunic; a mantle or cloak around her shoulders;a hood over her head. Anglo-Saxon men wore: Who were the Anglo-Saxons? The Angle, Saxon, and Jute are known as the Anglo-Saxons. The Angles and the Saxon tribes were the largest of the three attacking tribes and so we often know them as Anglo-Saxons. They shared the same language but were each ruled by different strong warriors. Anglo-Saxons

Did Anglo-Saxon ships have sails? An intriguing one, this. As a writer, you want to get it right, but how do you do that when the authorities disagree? My novel The Half-Slave revolves around the threat of a Saxon sea-borne invasion and it was vital that I came to a coherent view as to whether a fleet of Saxons in the late 4th century would have travelled under their own grunt-power or with the aid of sails and a following wind. Some historians argue that the Saxons of this period did not have sails, but travelled on raids in long rowing boats such as the one pictured. Life in Anglo-Saxon England 1. Introduction The Anglo-Saxon period lasted for some six centuries, from the arrival of Germanic invaders from the continent during the early fifth century AD to the Norman Conquest of 1066. Anglo Saxon Armour SUTTON HOO HELMET: This helmet was found in the ship-grave at Sutton Hoo. Can you see the two dragon's heads nose-to-nose at the front? From the little pieces it is possible to see what the whole helmet might have looked like: Reconstructed helmet. Here is what a shield probably looked like: Only the 'boss' (the middle part) and some of the metal deocorations have survived.

Anglo Saxon Weapons & Armour - Angelcynn Re-Enactment Society The principle weapon of the Anglo-Saxons was the spear. Spearheads came in many styles (Swanton classified 21 different forms), but were usually leaf- or 'kite-' shaped and had a socket for attachment to the shaft. It was usually diamond-shaped or lentoid in cross section, while the socket which continued from the narrow neck of the spearhead was split on one side and usually had an iron rivet to attach it to the shaft, which was usually of ash. The Anglo Saxon Survival Guide When the Anglo-Saxons Came to Britain what clothing did the wear? Objects found in graves as well as illustrations in Anglo-Saxon scrolls and books, stone engravings and images on objects can all give us a clue. Male clothing included shirts made of wool or linen and some form of loin-cloths. On their legs they wore woolen trousers or sometimes leggings. Over this was worn a tunic to mid thigh or even reaching to the knees.

Ashmolean Museum: Anglo-Saxon Discovery - Hilda and Ceolwulf's Day Ceolwulf and Hilda are bother and sister. They live on a farm with their parents, Burgred and Aelfwyn. They both get up early in the morning, when the sun rises. Where did the Anglo-Saxons come from? The Anglo-Saxons left their homelands in northern Germany, Denmark and The Netherlands and rowed across the North Sea in wooden boats to Britain. They sailed across the North Sea in their long ships, which had one sail and many oars. Anglo-Saxon warfare The period of Anglo-Saxon warfare spans the 5th Century AD to the 11th in England. Its technology and tactics resemble those of other European cultural areas of the Early Middle Ages, although the Anglo-Saxons, unlike the Continental Germanic tribes such as the Franks and the Goths, do not appear to have regularly fought on horseback.[1] Evidence[edit] Although much archaeological evidence for Anglo-Saxon weaponry exists from the Early Anglo-Saxon period due to the widespread inclusion of weapons as grave goods in inhumation burials, scholarly knowledge of warfare itself relies far more on the literary evidence, which was only being produced in the Christian context of the Late Anglo-Saxon period.

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