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Anglo-Saxon warfare

Anglo-Saxon warfare
The period of Anglo-Saxon warfare spans the 5th Century AD to the 11th in England. Its technology and tactics resemble those of other European cultural areas of the Early Middle Ages, although the Anglo-Saxons, unlike the Continental Germanic tribes such as the Franks and the Goths, do not appear to have regularly fought on horseback.[1] Evidence[edit] Although much archaeological evidence for Anglo-Saxon weaponry exists from the Early Anglo-Saxon period due to the widespread inclusion of weapons as grave goods in inhumation burials, scholarly knowledge of warfare itself relies far more on the literary evidence, which was only being produced in the Christian context of the Late Anglo-Saxon period. These literary sources are almost all authored by Christian clergy, and thus do not deal specifically with warfare; for instance, Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People mentions various battles that had taken place but does not dwell on them. Battlefield tactics[edit] See also[edit] Related:  Anglo-Saxons Year 5

Anglo Saxon Religion - Saxon Gods Days of the week The Anglo-Saxons were pagans when they came to Britain, but, as time passed, they gradually converted to Christianity. Many of the customs we have in England today come from pagan festivals. Pagans worshiped lots of different gods. Religion was a means of ensuring success in material things. Days of the Week Certain days of the week are named after early Saxon Gods. Monandæg ( Moon's day - the day of the moon ), Tiwesdæg ( Tiw's-day - the day of the Scandinavian sky god Tiw,Tiu or Tig), Wodnesdæg ( Woden's day - the day of the god Woden (Othin) ), Ðunresdæg ( Thor's Day - the day of the god Ðunor or Thunor ), Frigedæg ( Freyja's day - the day of the goddess Freyja or Frigg, wife to Woden), Sæternesdæg ( Saturn's day - the day of the Roman god Saturn, whose festival "Saturnalia," with its exchange of gifts, has been incorporated into our celebration of Christmas.), Sunnandæg ( Sun's day - the day of the sun ). Christianity then spread to other parts of Britain.

Primary History - Anglo-Saxons - Anglo-Saxons at war The Anglo Saxon Survival Guide When the Anglo-Saxons Came to Britain what clothing did the wear? Objects found in graves as well as illustrations in Anglo-Saxon scrolls and books, stone engravings and images on objects can all give us a clue. Male clothing included shirts made of wool or linen and some form of loin-cloths. A belt worn at the waist provided a practical location to hang a pouch, knife or seax and other accessories. Women would wear a tubular dress fastened at the shoulders. Women like men would usually have a belt, carry a small knife and pouch but also the senior female would carry keys to lock the store of food. Anglo-Saxon children wore clothes similar to the adults. Women and girls wore a lot of jewelry .

Anglo Saxon Weapons & Armour - Angelcynn Re-Enactment Society The principle weapon of the Anglo-Saxons was the spear. Spearheads came in many styles (Swanton classified 21 different forms), but were usually leaf- or 'kite-' shaped and had a socket for attachment to the shaft. It was usually diamond-shaped or lentoid in cross section, while the socket which continued from the narrow neck of the spearhead was split on one side and usually had an iron rivet to attach it to the shaft, which was usually of ash. Spearheads vary considerably in length from a few inches to two feet or more, and the basic forms change very little throughout the whole Anglo-Saxon period. The overall length of the spear was around 6'6" - 8' (2.00 - 2.50m), and the butt of the spear was often capped with a metal ferrule. Spears are found in around 86% of the Anglo-Saxon burials that contain weapons. Swanton's Classification for Early Anglo-Saxon Spearheads Type A This type of spearhead has a barbed head with a long metal shank connected to a socket. Scramaseaxes Swords

Anglo-Saxon clothes - women | Tha Engliscan Gesithas 5th to 7th centuries Women wore an under-dress of linen or wool with long sleeves and a draw-string neck. Sleeves were fastened with clasps for wealthier women, or drawn together with braid or string for poorer women. The outer dress was a tube of material, rather like a pinafore, and often called a ‘peplos’. 7th to 9th centuries Shoulder-brooches and wrist-clasps went out of fashion, and the sleeves of the over-dress now came to just below elbow-length on the arms and calf-length around the legs. 10th to 11th centuries The under-dress was now often pleated or folded, while the sleeves of the over-dress tended to flare towards the wrist. Children seem to have worn very much the same style of clothing as adults, but in smaller sizes. Making clothes was women’s work, and spinning and weaving were among the main activities of women in the Anglo-Saxon period.

Who were the Anglo-Saxons? The Angle, Saxon, and Jute are known as the Anglo-Saxons. The Angles and the Saxon tribes were the largest of the three attacking tribes and so we often know them as Anglo-Saxons. They shared the same language but were each ruled by different strong warriors. Anglo-Saxons The Anglo-Saxons were warrior-farmers and came from north-western Europe. They began to invade Britain while the Romans were still in control. The Anglo-Saxons were tall, fair-haired men, armed with swords and spears and round shields. They loved fighting and were very fierce. Their skills included hunting, farming, textile (cloth) production and leather working. How do we know about skills and occupations of the Anglo-Saxons ? We know about the Anglo-Saxons because of things we have found giving us quite detailed information about their lives. Knives and spears are often found in Anglo-Saxon men's graves. What did the Anglo-Saxons do for entertainment (leisure)?

Anglo Saxon life - Food and Drink The Anglo-Saxons loved eating and drinking and would often have feasts in the Hall. The food was cooked over the fire in the middle of the house; meat was roasted and eaten with bread. They drank ale and mead - a kind of beer made sweet with honey - from great goblets and drinking horns. After the feast a minstrel would play a harp and sing songs of battles and heroes. Anglo-Saxons ate what they grew. They grew cereals - Wheat and rye for bread, barley for brewing and oats for animal food and porridge. Exotic foods such as potatoes, tomatoes, bananas, pineapples - fruits and vegetables of the New World, were unknown to the Anglo-Saxons. Drink Barley was used to make weak beer, which was drunk instead of water. Most Anglo-Saxons were vegetarians because they could not get meat very often. Animals Pigs were important for food because they produce large litters, which would quickly mature and be ready for slaughter. Fish The Anglo-Saxons ate fish which they caught in the rivers and the seas.

Did Anglo-Saxon ships have sails? | Trevor Bloom - Author An intriguing one, this. As a writer, you want to get it right, but how do you do that when the authorities disagree? My novel The Half-Slave revolves around the threat of a Saxon sea-borne invasion and it was vital that I came to a coherent view as to whether a fleet of Saxons in the late 4th century would have travelled under their own grunt-power or with the aid of sails and a following wind. Some historians argue that the Saxons of this period did not have sails, but travelled on raids in long rowing boats such as the one pictured. The keels of the Saxon ships were not strong enough to support a sail, they say, and without a deep keel and mast-step such as the Vikings subsequently developed, ships had to be driven by oars. The remains of Saxon boats that have been discovered, particularly the Nydam ship and the Sutton Hoo ship, show no evidence of sails, although neither ship may have been typical of ocean-going vessels of the time. Sutton Hoo Not sure I buy this.

Anglo-Saxon clothes - men | Tha Engliscan Gesithas 5th and 6th centuries Men wore wool or linen hip-length undershirts with long sleeves, and probably loin-cloths. Woollen trousers were held up with a belt threaded through loops. A tunic was pulled over the head, and reached down to the knees. 7th to 11th centuries Tunics tended to have extra pleats inserted at the front, and sleeves became fairly tight-fitting between elbow and wrist. There was undoubtedly much variation according to region, period and status. Most clothes were made at home, and would almost certainly have undergone many repairs, or have been handed down, before being eventually cut up for rags or thrown away. Underclothes were not usually dyed, but left in their natural colour, or perhaps sun-bleached.

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