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Acerca de UML (Unified Modeling Language)

Acerca de UML (Unified Modeling Language)
Getting Started with UML: The Unified Modeling Language™ - UML - is OMG's most-used specification, and the way the world models not only application structure, behavior, and architecture, but also business process and data structure. UML, along with the Meta Object Facility (MOF™), also provides a key foundation for OMG's Model-Driven Architecture®, which unifies every step of development and integration from business modeling, through architectural and application modeling, to development, deployment, maintenance, and evolution. OMG is a not-for-profit technology standards consortium; our members define and maintain the UML specification which we publish in the series of documents linked on this page for your free download. Software providers of every kind build tools that conform to these specifications. To model in UML, you'll have to obtain a compliant modeling tool from one of these providers and learn how to use it.

http://www.uml.org/

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Reverse engineering Reverse engineering has its origins in the analysis of hardware for commercial or military advantage.[2] The purpose is to deduce design decisions from end products with little or no additional knowledge about the procedures involved in the original production. The same techniques are subsequently being researched for application to legacy software systems, not for industrial or defence ends, but rather to replace incorrect, incomplete, or otherwise unavailable documentation.[3] Motivation[edit] Reasons for reverse engineering:

Need to Document How Work Happens? Map The Process Let's say you know which work area, or process, needs improvement. You may even have concrete data about how that area performs (effectively or not). Before you can improve the work area, you'll need a solid understanding of what works and what really needs improvement. Now is the time to visually represent your findings, so that you can profoundly understand the "current state" (also known as "As Is") of your process and discover its true potential. Process maps are much more than simple boxes and lines that document a how work flows.

Unified Modeling Language UML logo The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a general-purpose modeling language in the field of software engineering, which is designed to provide a standard way to visualize the design of a system.[1] It was created and developed by Grady Booch, Ivar Jacobson and James Rumbaugh at Rational Software in the 1990s.[2] In 1997 it was adopted by the Object Management Group (OMG), and has been managed by this organization ever since. In 2000 the Unified Modeling Language was accepted by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as an approved standard. Since then it has been revised to cover the latest revision of UML.[3]

Framework-specific modeling language A framework-specific modeling language [1] (FSML) is a kind of domain-specific modeling language which is designed for an object-oriented application framework. FSMLs define framework-provided abstractions as FSML concepts and decompose the abstractions into features. The features represent implementation steps or choices. A FSML concept can be configured by selecting features and providing values for features. Visual Methods of Communicating Structure, Relationship, and Flow By Mike Hughes Published: November 16, 2009 “Many of us are more comfortable communicating in words than in pictures.” Many of us are more comfortable communicating in words than in pictures. For example, user assistance writers are by nature and training writers, so they understand words and are adept at using word processing and publishing tools. Writers use lexicentric tools not only for creating and delivering content, but also as cognitive tools—that is, tools that help them think more clearly and efficiently.

Sequence diagram Sequence diagram of e-mail message sequence A sequence diagram is an interaction diagram that shows how processes operate with one another and in what order. It is a construct of a Message Sequence Chart. A sequence diagram shows object interactions arranged in time sequence. Unified Modeling Language The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a general-purpose modeling language in the field of software engineering, which is designed to provide a standard way to visualize the design of a system.[1] It was created and developed by Grady Booch, Ivar Jacobson and James Rumbaugh at Rational Software during 1994–95 with further development led by them through 1996.[1] In 1997 it was adopted as a standard by the Object Management Group (OMG), and has been managed by this organization ever since. In 2000 the Unified Modeling Language was also accepted by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as an approved ISO standard. Since then it has been periodically revised to cover the latest revision of UML.[2] Overview[edit]

List Of Really Helpful Cheat Sheets For Web Developers Talking about Cheat sheets remind us about something can be really handful and helpful when we want to learn something. As There is always a useful shortcut to forget, a list of commands you fail to remember, a newly introduced function that slips your mind. It’s nearly impossible to remember multiple programming languages, frameworks and keyboard shortcuts to various applications. Flowchart Symbols Defined: Business Process Map and Flow Chart Symbols and their Meanings Flowchart Symbols and Their Meanings By Nicholas Hebb The following is a basic overview, with descriptions and meanings, of the most common flowchart symbols - also commonly called flowchart shapes, flow diagram symbols or process mapping symbols, depending upon what type of diagram you're creating. The table below lists the flowchart symbol drawing, the name of the flowchart symbol in Microsoft Office (with aliases in parentheses), and a short description of where and how the flowchart symbol is used. Excel Flowchart Wizard

The UML In the early 1990s, there were 3 competing methods proposed to support object-oriented development - these were based on work by Booch (Booch, 1994), Rumbaugh (Rumbaugh, 1991) and Jacobsen (Jacobsen,1993). These approaches had much in comment and they were unified in the 1990s to create the Unified Modeling Language (UML) and the associated unified design process (Rumbaugh, Blaha, Premerlani, Eddy and Lorensen, 1991)(Booch, Rumbaugh and Jacobson, 1999, Rumbaugh, Jacobson and Booch, 1999a, Rumbaugh, Jacobson and Booch, 1999b). Since then, the UML has emerged as the standard notation for object-oriented modelling and design. UML 2 - an extension of the original UML - includes 13 different diagram types which allow the static and dynamic modelling of software.

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