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MDA

MDA

http://www.omg.org/mda/

Related:  Arquitectura Conducida por Modelos: Principios y Prácticas

Software Product Lines A software product line (SPL) is a set of software-intensive systems that share a common, managed set of features satisfying the specific needs of a particular market segment or mission and that are developed from a common set of core assets in a prescribed way. Software product lines are emerging as a viable and important development paradigm allowing companies to realize order-of-magnitude improvements in time to market, cost, productivity, quality, and other business drivers. Software product line engineering can also enable rapid market entry and flexible response, and provide a capability for mass customization.

Service - Oriented Architecture See also the client-server model, a progenitor concept A Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is a design pattern in which software/application components provide services to other software/application components via a protocol, typically over a network and in a loosely-coupled way. The principles of service-orientation are independent of any vendor, product or technology.[1] A service is a self-contained unit of functionality, such as retrieving an online bank statement.[2] By that definition, a service is a discretely invokable operation. However, in the Web Services Definition Language (WSDL), a service is an interface definition that may list several discrete services/operations.

IBM Rational Unified Process The Rational Unified Process (RUP) is an iterative software development process framework created by the Rational Software Corporation, a division of IBM since 2003.[1] RUP is not a single concrete prescriptive process, but rather an adaptable process framework, intended to be tailored by the development organizations and software project teams that will select the elements of the process that are appropriate for their needs. RUP is a specific implementation of the Unified Process. History[edit] Combining the experience base of companies led to the articulation of six best practices for modern software engineering: Develop iteratively, with risk as the primary iteration driver[2]Manage requirementsEmploy a component-based architectureModel software visuallyContinuously verify qualityControl changes a tailorable process that guided developmenttools that automated the application of that processservices that accelerated adoption of both the process and the tools.

Conceptual model (computer science) This is often used for defining different processes in a particular Company or Institute. Fowler, Martin: Analysis Patterns, Reusable object models, Addison-Wesley Longman, 1997. ISBN 0-201-89542-0.Stewart Robinson, Roger Brooks, Kathy Kotiadis, and Durk-Jouke Van Der Zee (Eds.): Conceptual Modeling for Discrete-Event Simulation, 2010. UML, RUP, and the Zachman Framework: Better together Over the past decade, the advantages of using the Unified Modeling Language (UML) for modeling software applications have become clear. During this same timeframe, the Rational Unified Process, or RUP, has proved itself as a software development process, and the Zachman Framework1 has proved itself as a framework for organizing and communicating architectural artifacts. Amid the swarm of overlapping methodologies, these stand apart as three pillars of modern information systems architecture. This article considers the combined usages of these technologies by examining their meta-characteristics and proposing some ways to apply them in combination within organizations. UML, RUP, and Zachman in brief By definition, UML is a modeling language.

Round-trip engineering Round-trip engineering (RTE) is a functionality of software development tools that synchronizes two or more related software artifacts, such as, source code, models, configuration files, and other documents. The need for round-trip engineering arises when the same information is present in multiple artifacts and therefore an inconsistency may occur if not all artifacts are consistently updated to reflect a given change. For example, some piece of information was added to/changed in only one artifact and, as a result, it became missing in/inconsistent with the other artifacts. Round-trip engineering is closely related to traditional software engineering disciplines: forward engineering (creating software from specifications), reverse engineering (creating specifications from existing software), and reengineering (understanding existing software and modifying it).

Zachman Framework The Zachman Framework of enterprise architecture The Zachman Framework is not a methodology in that it does not imply any specific method or process for collecting, managing, or using the information that it describes.;[2] rather, it is an Ontology whereby a schema for organizing architectural artifacts (in other words, design documents, specifications, and models) is used to take into account both whom the artifact targets (for example, business owner and builder) and what particular issue (for example, data and functionality) is being addressed.[3] The framework is named after its creator John Zachman, who first developed the concept in the 1980s at IBM. It has been updated several times since.[4] Overview[edit]

Unified Modeling Language The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a general-purpose modeling language in the field of software engineering, which is designed to provide a standard way to visualize the design of a system.[1] It was created and developed by Grady Booch, Ivar Jacobson and James Rumbaugh at Rational Software during 1994–95 with further development led by them through 1996.[1] In 1997 it was adopted as a standard by the Object Management Group (OMG), and has been managed by this organization ever since. In 2000 the Unified Modeling Language was also accepted by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as an approved ISO standard. Since then it has been periodically revised to cover the latest revision of UML.[2]

Enterprise Architecture Tools, Institute For Enterprise Architecture Developments (IFEAD) Troux Troux provides a set of purposed, packaged applications built on a highly scalable software platform along with a best of breed modeling tool that delivers significant business value from Business Technology Management and Enterprise Architecture. Troux’s customer list is a who’s who of the Global 2000 with successful deployments ranging from small EA teams to ones with more than 10,000 regular users. The Open Group Architecture Framework Structure of the TOGAF Architecture Development Method (ADM).[1] The Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF) is a framework for enterprise architecture which provides an approach for designing, planning, implementing, and governing an enterprise information technology architecture.[2] TOGAF has been a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries since 2011.[3] TOGAF is a high level approach to design. It is typically modeled at four levels: Business, Application, Data, and Technology. It relies heavily on modularization, standardization, and already existing, proven technologies and products.

Framework-specific modeling language A framework-specific modeling language [1] (FSML) is a kind of domain-specific modeling language which is designed for an object-oriented application framework. FSMLs define framework-provided abstractions as FSML concepts and decompose the abstractions into features. The features represent implementation steps or choices. Reverse engineering Reverse engineering has its origins in the analysis of hardware for commercial or military advantage.[2] The purpose is to deduce design decisions from end products with little or no additional knowledge about the procedures involved in the original production. The same techniques are subsequently being researched for application to legacy software systems, not for industrial or defence ends, but rather to replace incorrect, incomplete, or otherwise unavailable documentation.[3] Motivation[edit]

Information Technology Infrastructure Library ITIL (formerly known as the Information Technology Infrastructure Library) is a set of practices for IT service management (ITSM) that focuses on aligning IT services with the needs of business. In its current form (known as ITIL 2011 edition), ITIL is published as a series of five core volumes, each of which covers a different ITSM lifecycle stage. Although ITIL underpins ISO/IEC 20000 (previously BS15000), the International Service Management Standard for IT service management, the two frameworks do have some differences. ITIL describes processes, procedures, tasks, and checklists which are not organization-specific, but can be applied by an organization for establishing integration with the organization's strategy, delivering value, and maintaining a minimum level of competency. It allows the organization to establish a baseline from which it can plan, implement, and measure. It is used to demonstrate compliance and to measure improvement.

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