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Earth - Your life on earth

Explore BBC Earth's unique interactive, personalised just to you. Find out how, since the date of your birth, your life has progressed; including how many times your heart has beaten, and how far you have travelled through space. Investigate how the world around you has changed since you've been alive; from the amount the sea has risen, and the tectonic plates have moved, to the number of earthquakes and volcanoes that have erupted. Grasp the impact we've had on the planet in your lifetime; from how much fuel and food we've used to the species we've discovered and endangered. And see how the BBC was there with you, capturing some of the most amazing wonders of the natural world. Explore, enjoy, and share with your friends either the whole page, or your favourite insights. This is your story, the story of your life on earth. BBC Earth's Your life on earth is based on the following sources. Lead photo credit: John Kellerman / Alamy.

http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20141016-your-life-on-earth

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If the Moon Were Only 1 Pixel - A tediously accurate map of the solar system Mercury Venus Earth You Are Here The Human Journey: Migration Routes When humans first ventured out of Africa some 60,000 years ago, they left genetic footprints still visible today. By mapping the appearance and frequency of genetic markers in modern peoples, we create a picture of when and where ancient humans moved around the world. These great migrations eventually led the descendants of a small group of Africans to occupy even the farthest reaches of the Earth. Our species is an African one: Africa is where we first evolved, and where we have spent the majority of our time on Earth. The earliest fossils of recognizably modern Homo sapiens appear in the fossil record at Omo Kibish in Ethiopia, around 200,000 years ago. Although earlier fossils may be found over the coming years, this is our best understanding of when and approximately where we originated.

These Maps Show You How to Live, Not Just Where Data for GOOD Knowledge is the first step on the way to progress. It used to be that paper maps were the free gifts that came with your new compass, graphically representing geography via points, lines, and fire-breathing dragons—all of which indicated orientation, distance, latitude, longitude, and the sheer vastness of uncharted territory. But today’s multidimensional digital maps are comprehensive, interactive, and they’ve got the compass built right in. Plus, they’re changing the way we interact with our environments and with each other. Regionales de Alimentos Comunes como respuesta sistémica Currently, less than 3% of the food that Americans eat is grown within 100 to 200 miles of where they live. And many people in poorer neighborhoods simply do not have ready access to affordable local produce. A fascinating new project, the Food Commons, aspires to radically change this reality.

Lawrence Hall of Science - 24/7 Science How fast does the wind blow? What makes things sticky? Where do insects live and plants grow? What is the best way to clean up the environment? How do humans measure up in the animal kingdom? So many questions—and so many ways to find answers! Hundreds of billions of stars are strewn like fairy lights in the dark cosmic ocean of the universe. Until 25 years ago, our observations of the beauty and destruction of the cosmos was obscured by Earth’s atmosphere—the Hubble Space Telescope has liberated astronomers from earth-bound worries like atmospheric turbulence. As unassuming as the Hubble may look compared to the vastness of space, the telescope is actually the length of a large school bus, weighs as much as two elephants, and travels around Earth at 5 miles per second. It has also beamed back thousands of cosmic images over the last two decades, including: the birth and death of stars, beautiful galactic pinwheels, interstellar clouds of dust, planets with sixty-seven moons, and ancient stars. Today, we celebrate the contribution the Hubble Space Telescope has made as well as look to the future. Three years from now, a telescope even more powerful than Hubble will peer deeper into space than ever before.

The Origin of Humans Is Surprisingly Complicated HUMAN FAMILY TREE used to be a scraggly thing. With relatively few fossils to work from, scientists' best guess was that they could all be assigned to just two lineages, one of which went extinct and the other of which ultimately gave rise to us. Discoveries made over the past few decades have revealed a far more luxuriant tree, however—one abounding with branches and twigs that eventually petered out. Pollution Locator: USA Over 4 billion pounds of toxic chemicals are released by industry into the nation's environment each year, including 72 million pounds of recognized carcinogens. Scorecard can give you a detailed report on chemicals being released from any of 20,000 industrial facilities, or a summary report for any area in the country. Scorecard spotlights the top polluters in the U.S., and ranks states and counties by pollutant releases.

Filmmakers Propose Online "Swarm Offensive" Against Climate Change by CoalitionFilm Open source software brought us Linux and Wikipedia. Can it help us tackle the challenge of climate change? posted Aug 29, 2014 Molecular Workbench Three Views of MW Senior Scientist and Molecular Workbench Developer Charles Xie, Researcher and Manager Amy Pallant, and Technology and Curriculum Developer Dan Damelin describe the history of Molecular Workbench and our vision for the future. Watch the Video undefinedundefinedundefined Selected Curriculum Modules

Current Night Sky This month, there will be opportunities to see four planets nearly simultaneously. In order from west to east they are: Mercury, Jupiter, Mars, and Saturn. In the same line as these planets, you will be able to see four bright, first-magnitude stars: Pollux, Regulus, Spica, and Antares. Even better, on the 13th, you can catch the waxing gibbous Moon rising over the eastern horizon while all four planets will be visible.

This Breathtaking Video Reveals How Humanity Took Over The World The Black Death. The Second World War. The Industrial Revolution. spp.dsdip.esriaustraliaonline.com SPP Interactive Mapping System (Plan Making) +Administrative Layers +Liveable Communities and Housing There is no mapping associated with this State Interest. +Economic Growth +Environment and Heritage Qué es Livestream? What is Livestream? A place to broadcast live events Broadcast to millions, live in HD with our Platform, Producer, Broadcaster and Studio products. A place to watch live events Visit livestream.com, or any of our free Livestream apps for TV, iPad, iPhone and Android to watch live sports, news, education, music and more.

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