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Martin Seligman on positive psychology

Martin Seligman on positive psychology

http://www.ted.com/talks/martin_seligman_on_the_state_of_psychology.html

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Applying Positive Psychology in the classroom « adolescent toolbox blog In a recent lecture by Dr Toni Noble she stated that 8 out of top 11 factors affecting academic performance & learning relate to social-emotional factors, such as; School Culture Classroom climate Classroom management Quality of Student-teacher interactions Peer support   The Featured Five The Tool for when you need to take action on what you have been avoiding. We avoid doing the things that are most painful for us but the more you act and face the pain, the more options come your way. The Tool for when you are so enraged with a person that the anger traps you in a maze. You replay the bad situation or fantasize about revenge, which only isolates you while the world moves forward without you. The Tool for when insecurity or your “shadow” (an embodiment of everything you wish you were not) keeps you from expressing yourself. Embracing your shadow saves you the energy of hiding it and allows you the release and freedom to be your natural self.

Why do some people enjoy life and others don't? Propose a movement whose aim is to bottle happiness so it can be dispensed to one and all, saving humanity from a future of chronic misery, and you might expect at least a few people to roll their eyes. But, starting tomorrow, Britain's most prestigious scientific institution, the Royal Society, will host a meeting for some of the world's top psychologists who have done just that. Over two days, they will discuss "the science of wellbeing". Their aim is to find out why it is that some people's lives go so right.

Sonja Lyubomirsky Sonja Lyubomirsky is a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of California, Riverside and author of The How of Happiness, a book of strategies backed by scientific research that can be used to increase happiness.[1] She is often quoted in news articles about positive psychology and happiness.[2][3][4] In the book The Only Self-Help Book You'll Ever Need, a criticism of self-help books, Lyubomirsky's The How of Happiness is praised as a self-help book that has claims backed by empirical data.[5] Lyubomirsky is also an associate editor of the Journal of Positive Psychology. The How of Happiness[edit] Breakdown of sources of happiness, according to The How of Happiness

Positive Psychology in the Classroom –by Sherri Fisher Do you ever wish you were more creative? New research has shown that adults can be primed to become more creative simply by being asked to think like children. There are many kinds of creativity, including flexible thinking, elaboration of existing ideas, fluency of ideas, and originality. For the purposes of the study conducted at North Dakota State University, college students were asked to imagine and write about what they would do if school was canceled for the day. In the experimental condition, they were primed in advance of writing to imagine that they were seven years old.

An Interview With Adam Phillips The Stone is a forum for contemporary philosophers and other thinkers on issues both timely and timeless. This video is part of a weekly series of interviews with contemporary thinkers and philosophers on questions that matter. Adam Phillips is a psychotherapist, literary critic and the author several well-known books, including “On Kissing, Tickling and Being Bored,” “Going Sane,” “On Kindness” and most recently, “On Balance.” Positive psychology To Martin Seligman, psychology (particularly its positive branch) can investigate and promote realistic ways of fostering more joy in individuals and communities. Positive psychology is a recent branch of psychology whose purpose was summed up in 1998 by Martin Seligman and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi: "We believe that a psychology of positive human functioning will arise, which achieves a scientific understanding and effective interventions to build thriving individuals, families, and communities.

To predict what will make you happy, ask a stranger rather than guessing yourself Want to know how much you’d enjoy an experience? You’re better off asking someone who has been through it, even if they’re a complete stranger, than to find out information for yourself. This advice comes from Daniel Gilbert from Harvard University, who espoused it in his superb book Stumbling on Happiness. Now, he has found new support for the idea by studying speed-daters and people receiving feedback from their peers. In the first study, he found that female students were better able to predict how much they would enjoy a speed-date if they listened to the experiences of strangers than if they make their own assessments based on available information.

frederick herzberg motivational theory, motivators and hygiene factors, free herzberg diagrams home » leadership/management » frederick herzberg motivational theory Frederick Herzberg's motivation and hygiene factors Frederick Herzberg (1923-2000), clinical psychologist and pioneer of 'job enrichment', is regarded as one of the great original thinkers in management and motivational theory. Frederick I Herzberg was born in Massachusetts on April 18, 1923.

The Neuroscience of Reframing & How to Do It by Anette Prehn I am a social scientist (M.A.), leadership trainer, thinker, poet, motivational speaker, and professional certified coach (PCC), helping bright, enthusiastic people excel. Having specialised in turning the insights of neuroscience into down-to-earth tools, I help of executives, managers and teams boost their change processes, relational power and results. The author of Play Your Brain (August 2011) and with First Framestorm and Broccoli for Breakfast on their way, my ambition is to reach young and old with powerful and fun brain-based tools. I believe in art and science united. I believe in making difficult things really easy. Employee motivation. Motivation in the workplace- theory and practice Employee motivation, the organizational environment and productivity The job of a manager in the workplace is to get things done through employees. To do this the manager should be able to motivate employees. But that's easier said than done! Motivation practice and theory are difficult subjects, touching on several disciplines.

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