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Positive Psychology UK

Positive Psychology UK
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Money <em>can</em> buy happiness… if you spend it on other people | Not Exactly Rocket Science “This planet has – or rather had – a problem, which was this: most of the people living on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small green pieces of paper, which is odd because on the whole it wasn’t the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy.” – Douglas Adams In this pithy paragraph, the sorely missed Douglas Adams sums up a puzzling paradox of modern life – we often link happiness to money and the spending of it, even though both proverbs and psychological surveys suggest that the two are unrelated. Across and within countries, income has an incredibly weak effect on happiness once people have enough to secure basic needs and standards of living. Once people are lifted out of abject poverty and thrown into the middle class, any extra earnings do little to improve their joie de vivre. I can’t get no… satisfcation Hey big spender There is a silver lining then.

Positive Psychology in the Classroom | –by Sherri Fisher Do you ever wish you were more creative? New research has shown that adults can be primed to become more creative simply by being asked to think like children. There are many kinds of creativity, including flexible thinking, elaboration of existing ideas, fluency of ideas, and originality. For the purposes of the study conducted at North Dakota State University, college students were asked to imagine and write about what they would do if school was canceled for the day. What Happens to Creativity as We Grow? There are numerous benefits to being more creative. Since both ways of thinking are important (imagine if we were all child-like all the time), it is intriguing to think about interventions that would enable you to be more creative at least some of the time. Mastery Goals versus Performance Goals Most schools are structured around performance goals. Are We Discouraging Love of Learning in Students? Can you nurture your creativity? References Dweck, C. (2007).

Positive Psychology Center 10 Open Education Resources You May Not Know About (But Should) This week, the OCW Consortium is holding its annual meeting, celebrating 10 years of OpenCourseWare. The movement to make university-level content freely and openly available online began a decade ago, when the faculty at MIT agreed to put the materials from all 2,000 of the university’s courses on the Web. With that gesture, MIT OpenCourseWare helped launch an important educational movement, one that MIT President Susan Hockfield described in her opening remarks at yesterday’s meeting as both the child of technology and of a far more ancient academic tradition: “the tradition of the global intellectual commons.” We have looked here before at how OCW has shaped education in the last ten years, but in many ways much of the content that has been posted online remains very much “Web 1.0.” But as open educational resources and OCW increase in popularity and usage, there are a number of new resources out there that do offer just that.

Positive Psychology - What Is Positive Psychology Positive psychology is one of the newest branches of psychology to emerge. This particular area of psychology focuses on how to help human beings prosper and lead healthy, happy lives. While many other branches of psychology tend to focus on dysfunction and abnormal behavior, positive psychology is centered on helping people become happier. Martin Seligman and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi describe positive psychology in the following way: "We believe that a psychology of positive human functioning will arise that achieves a scientific understanding and effective interventions to build thriving in individuals, families, and communities." Over the last ten years or so, general interest in positive psychology has grown tremendously. The History of Positive Psychology "Before World War II, psychology had three distinct missions: curing mental illness, making the lives of all people more productive and fulfilling, and identifying and nurturing high talent," Seligman wrote in 2005. References

To predict what will make you happy, ask a stranger rather than guessing yourself | Not Exactly Rocket Science Want to know how much you’d enjoy an experience? You’re better off asking someone who has been through it, even if they’re a complete stranger, than to find out information for yourself. This advice comes from Daniel Gilbert from Harvard University, who espoused it in his superb book Stumbling on Happiness. Now, he has found new support for the idea by studying speed-daters and people receiving feedback from their peers. In the first study, he found that female students were better able to predict how much they would enjoy a speed-date if they listened to the experiences of strangers than if they make their own assessments based on available information. This interesting result masks a second one of equal importance – people don’t believe that this works. Time and again, psychological studies have found that we overestimate how happy we will be after winning a prize, starting a new relationship or taking revenge against those who have wronged us. Photo by Laughlin, found on Flickr

Applying Positive Psychology in the classroom « adolescent toolbox blog In a recent lecture by Dr Toni Noble she stated that 8 out of top 11 factors affecting academic performance & learning relate to social-emotional factors, such as; School Culture Classroom climate Classroom management Quality of Student-teacher interactions Peer support Student’s social & behavioural skills Student motivation Parental support (Wang, Haertel & Walberg, 1997 As a result, Positive Psychology has a definite place in the curriculum and in the promoting of Quality Teaching. 1. Caring, kindness Acceptance of difference Respect Friendliness cooperation 2. Show flexibility Highlight stories of others who demonstrate resilience 3. See Dr Noble’s BOUNCE BACK program to highlight key words and skills to build resilience 4. Optimistic thinking Positive tracking When exploring negative experiences, highlight positive outcomes as well 5. Everyday courage Appropriate risk taking Courage requires action, action can lead to mistakes, mistakes can lead to learning 6 Relationships Making & keeping friends 7. 8.

Why do some people enjoy life and others don't? | Society Propose a movement whose aim is to bottle happiness so it can be dispensed to one and all, saving humanity from a future of chronic misery, and you might expect at least a few people to roll their eyes. But, starting tomorrow, Britain's most prestigious scientific institution, the Royal Society, will host a meeting for some of the world's top psychologists who have done just that. Over two days, they will discuss "the science of wellbeing". As the psychologists converge on London, some, though dutifully upbeat, admit that the public could be forgiven for getting the wrong idea about the meeting. For the record, Baylis defines wellbeing as a state that allows someone to thrive and flourish. The positive psychology movement was born in 1998 when Martin Seligman, a psychologist at the University of Pennsylvania, was voted in as president of the American Psychological Association. "What we've found is that if someone is happy with life, they are more popular. So much for the theory.

Positive psychology advances, with growing pains If you measure a field’s success by the media attention it attracts and the number of people it influences, positive psychology is a sensation. Positive psychology — a term coined in 1998 by former APA President Martin E.P. Seligman, PhD, and Claremont Graduate University psychology professor Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, PhD — has been the darling of the popular press, making the cover of Time (Jan. 17, 2005), and featured in The Washington Post (2002), the London Sunday Times Magazine (2005), The New York Times Magazine (2006), U.S. News & World Report (2009), and even a six-part BBC series (2006). It’s spawned dozens of books geared toward both a scientific and popular audience, including Seligman’s latest on the virtues of positive psychology: “Flourish: A Visionary New Understanding of Happiness and Well-Being,” published by Simon & Schuster this month. “It’s been extremely good for psychology,” says University of Virginia psychologist Jonathan Haidt, PhD. Moving too fast?

Positivity Central We want to take our science, knowledge and arts about positive psychology, states, feelings and experiences to the next level-- to scientifically explore, elucidate, codify, and create a unified, interwoven, integrated paradigm which collects together existing models so as to evolve a useful, practical Positive Science which spawns a collection of tools, technologies and techniques for optimizing human and social functioning, performance, health and happiness. In a world where there are hundreds of thousands of studies and meetings on what is negative, on what to move away from and eliminate, experts on what's wrong-- we need a positive vision-- somewhere and something to move towards. We need to create a science of things positive-- of Positivity. How far can we go with positive approaches? I started a conference that explores these ideas. I wrote a book based on my ideas about self awareness, self regulation and emotional intelligence, . Ralph Waldo Emerson by Rob Kall

Sonja Lyubomirsky Sonja Lyubomirsky is a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of California, Riverside and author of The How of Happiness, a book of strategies backed by scientific research that can be used to increase happiness.[1] She is often quoted in news articles about positive psychology and happiness.[2][3][4] In the book The Only Self-Help Book You'll Ever Need, a criticism of self-help books, Lyubomirsky's The How of Happiness is praised as a self-help book that has claims backed by empirical data.[5] Lyubomirsky is also an associate editor of the Journal of Positive Psychology. The How of Happiness[edit] Breakdown of sources of happiness, according to The How of Happiness The How of Happiness has spawned an iPhone application called Live Happy, produced by Signal Patterns. The How of Happiness has also spawned a song called The How of Happiness Book Tune, which acts as a mnemonic aid to help readers remember the content within the book. [11] References[edit] See also[edit]

frederick herzberg motivational theory, motivators and hygiene factors, free herzberg diagrams home » leadership/management » frederick herzberg motivational theory Frederick Herzberg's motivation and hygiene factors Frederick Herzberg (1923-2000), clinical psychologist and pioneer of 'job enrichment', is regarded as one of the great original thinkers in management and motivational theory. Frederick Herzberg's book 'The Motivation to Work', written with research colleagues Bernard Mausner and Barbara Bloch Snyderman in 1959, first established his theories about motivation in the workplace. Herzberg's research used a pioneering approach, based on open questioning and very few assumptions, to gather and analyse details of 'critical incidents' as recalled by the survey respondents. Herzberg also prepared intensively prior to his 1959 study - not least by scrutinizing and comparing the results and methodologies of all 155 previous research studies into job attitudes carried out between 1920 and 1954. herzberg's main theory and its significance N.B. to what extent is money a motivator?

Positive psychology To Martin Seligman, psychology (particularly its positive branch) can investigate and promote realistic ways of fostering more joy in individuals and communities. Positive psychology is a recent branch of psychology whose purpose was summed up in 1998 by Martin Seligman and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi: "We believe that a psychology of positive human functioning will arise, which achieves a scientific understanding and effective interventions to build thriving individuals, families, and communities."[1] Positive psychologists seek "to find and nurture genius and talent" and "to make normal life more fulfilling",[2] rather than merely treating mental illness. Positive psychology is primarily concerned with using the psychological theory, research and intervention techniques to understand the positive, adaptive, creative and emotionally fulfilling aspects of human behavior.[3] Overview[edit] Research from this branch of psychology has seen various practical applications. The goal[edit]

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