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Near field communication

Near field communication
A summary of near-field communication Near field communication (NFC) is a set of ideas and technology that enables smartphones and other devices to establish radio communication with each other by touching the devices together or bringing them into proximity to a distance of typically 10 cm (3.9 in) or less. Early business models such as advertising and industrial applications were not successful, having been overtaken by alternative technologies such as barcodes or UHF tags, but what distinguishes NFC is that devices are often cloud connected. All NFC-enabled smartphones can be provided with dedicated apps including 'ticket' readers as opposed to the traditional dedicated infrastructure that specifies a particular (often proprietary) standard for stock ticket, access control and payment readers. By contrast all NFC peers can connect to a third party NFC device that acts as a server for any action (or reconfiguration). History[edit] Design[edit] Standards[edit] NFC Protocol stack overview

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Near_field_communication

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CoreDX DDS Data Distribution Service Middleware CoreDX DDS is an easy-to-use, cross-platform, cross-language Inter-Process Communication (IPC) library. CoreDX DDS is high-performance and low-overhead, with great latency and message throughput numbers. CoreDX DDS provides robust, flexible, and dynamic data communications. Based on Open Standards for guaranteed Interoperability and long term viability, CoreDX DDS is the preferred IPC for a wide variety of distributed software programs: from mobile games and consumer electronic devices to surgical equipment, health care applications, complex DoD systems and robots working in space.

VMEbus VME64 crate with, from left, an ADC module, a scaler module and a processor module History[edit] In 1979, during development of the Motorola 68000 CPU, one of their engineers, Jack Kister, decided to set about creating a standardized bus system for 68000-based systems. The Motorola team brainstormed for days to select the name VERSAbus. VERSAbus cards were large, 14.5" by 9.25", and used edge connectors.[1] Only a few products adopted it, including the IBM System 9000 instrument controller and the Automatix robot and machine vision systems.

The difference between RFID and NFC? When acronyms attack, people get confused. That's especially true when two acronyms stand for a couple of very similar wireless technologies. In this case, our geeky acronyms are NFC and RFID, two close cousins in a world filled with wireless wizardry. NFC stands for near field communication, while RFID means radio frequency identification. Both employ radio signals for all sorts of tagging and tracking purposes, sometimes replacing bar codes. Data Distribution Service (DDS) Imagine a world where cars are able to navigate safely to their destinations and find parking without a driver; where patient monitoring systems are smartly integrated to provide error-free alerts and doctors are able to keep track of homebound patients’ health. This world is no longer a vision of some distant future or a science fiction movie. Every day more and more devices are becoming connected allowing smart machines and systems to perform functions that were not possible before.

VME eXtensions for Instrumentation The VXI bus architecture is an open standard platform for automated test based upon VMEbus. VXI stands for VME eXtensions for Instrumentation, defining additional bus lines for timing and triggering as well as mechanical requirements and standard protocols for configuration, message-based communication, multi-chassis extension, and other features. In 2004, the 2eVME extension was added to the VXI bus specification, giving it a maximum data rate of 160 MB/s. The VXIbus grew from the VME bus specification, it was established in 1987 by Hewlett Packard (now Agilent Technologies), Racal Instruments (now EADS North America Test and Services), Colorado Data Systems, Wavetek and Tektronix.

Comprehensive list >> NFC Use-cases NFC applications are limited only by the imagination and individual creativity. NFC makes the experience of mobile internet and other mobile services fast and convenient, and opens up a host of new opportunities. Mobile NFC is making the 'internet of things' a reality, bringing the world of NFC to new audiences, including advertisers, marketing agencies and potentially every consumer using a mobile NFC phone.

Radio-frequency identification Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is the wireless use of electromagnetic fields to transfer data, for the purposes of automatically identifying and tracking tags attached to objects. The tags contain electronically stored information. Some tags are powered by electromagnetic induction from magnetic fields produced near the reader. Some types collect energy from the interrogating radio waves and act as a passive transponder. Other types have a local power source such as a battery and may operate at hundreds of meters from the reader. homeos It is no secret that homes are ever-increasing hotbeds of new technology such as set-top boxes, game consoles, wireless routers, home automation devices, tablets, smart phones, and security cameras. This innovation is breeding heterogeneity and complexity that frustrates even technically-savvy users’ attempts to improve day-to-day life by implementing functionality that uses these devices in combination. For instance, it is impossible for most users to view video captured by their security camera on their smartphone when they are not at home. Heterogeneity across devices and across homes also makes it difficult to develop applications that solve these problems in a way that work across a range of homes. To simplify the management of technology and to simplify the development of applications in the home, we are developing an "operating system" for the home. HomeOS provides a centralized, holistic control of devices in the home.

InfiniBand InfiniBand is a switched fabric computer network communications link used in high-performance computing and enterprise data centers. InfiniBand forms a superset of the Virtual Interface Architecture (VIA). Description[edit] Like Fibre Channel, PCI Express, Serial ATA, and many other modern interconnects, InfiniBand offers point-to-point bidirectional serial links intended for the connection of processors with high-speed peripherals such as disks.

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