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Teaching Copyright

Teaching Copyright
As today's tech-savvy teens become increasingly involved with technology and the Internet for learning, work, civic engagement, and entertainment, it is vital to ensure that they understand their legal rights and responsibilities under copyright law and also how the law affects creativity and innovation. This curriculum is designed to give teachers a comprehensive set of tools to educate students about copyright while incorporating activities that exercise a variety of learning skills. Lesson topics include: the history of copyright law; the relationship between copyright and innovation; fair use and its relationship to remix culture; peer-to-peer file sharing; and the interests of the stakeholders that ultimately affect how copyright is interpreted by copyright owners, consumers, courts, lawmakers, and technology innovators. Unit Goals Educate students about copyright law, including the concepts of fair use, free speech, and the public domain. Objectives for Students Assessment

http://www.teachingcopyright.org/curriculum/hs

Related:  Copyright, Fair Share, Creative CommonsDigital CitizenshipPersonal Learning Network

Fair Use U.S. Copyright Office Fair Use Index Welcome to the U.S. 5 Reasons You Should Be Teaching Digital Citizenship 5 Reasons You Should Be Teaching Digital Citizenship by Paul Barnwell, Teacher of English & Digital Media Students buzzed about the latest uproar on Instagram. Anonymous sources had posted a “questionable”–and NSFW–list for multiple public schools in our city on Instagram, leading to distraught girls, viral Twitter reactions, and an investigation.

Exploring Plagiarism, Copyright, and Paraphrasing ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, videos, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. Students as Creators: Exploring Copyright ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, videos, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More

Copyright & plagiarism for students Copyright & plagiarism for students Copyright infringement Copyright infringement is when an individual, who does not possess the copyright of a work, violates one or more of six rights (reproduction, adaptation, distribution, public performance, public display, digital transmission of sound recordings) of copyright owners. There are three types of copyright infringement: innocent, standard, or willful.

A Visual Guide To Creative Commons Licensing A Visual Guide To Creative Commons Licensing Creative Commons licensing was one of the best things that ever happened to the internet. Where once the internet was an untamed beast overran by plagiarism, non-attributed image theft, copyright confusion, and super shaky sense of who owns what–well, really that hasn’t changed for most.

Five-Minute Film Festival: Teaching Digital Citizenship "Digital citizenship" is an umbrella term that covers a whole host of important issues. Broadly, it's the guidelines for responsible, appropriate behavior when one is using technology. But specifically, it can cover anything from "netiquette" to cyberbullying; technology access and the digital divide; online safety and privacy; copyright, plagiarism, and digital law, and more. In fact, some programs that teach digital citizenship have outlined no less than nine elements that intersect to inform a well-equipped digital citizen.

Plagiarism Scavenger Hunt Learner Description: The page is created for middle school students and is intended to help the student avoid plagiarism. What is considered plagiarism? The use of another's person words, image, or brand and passing it off as your own original thought Copy and pasting web site content without giving credit to the author Omitting quotation marks on content found on another source Using words from another source with the incorrect information or citation Using words and the same sentence structure of a source without citations Plagiarism has proved to be a big issue among today's students. Teachers and administration have stressed the importance of educating you, the learner, on what plagiarism is and steps on how to avoid academic punishment due to plagiarism. This activity has been designed to help you understand the meaning of plagiarism, particularly as it pertains to completing research papers as well as when to use proper citations.

Curriculum: Understanding YouTube & Digital Citizenship – Google in Education Overview We have devised an interactive curriculum aimed to support teachers of secondary students (approximately ages 13-17). The curriculum helps educate students on topics like: YouTube’s policies How to report content on YouTube How to protect their privacy online How to be responsible YouTube community members How to be responsible digital citizens We hope that students and educators gain useful skills and a holistic understanding about responsible digital citizenship, not only on YouTube, but in all online activity.

8 Resources To Find & Edit Digital Images Without Being Sued by simplyzesty.com 8 Resources To Find & Edit Digital Images Without Being Sued If you own or write for a blog, you will know the pain and annoyance of sourcing images for it. No matter what type of post you’re writing, images are always needed to brighten them up and break up the walls of text. However, adapting a strategy of going onto Google Images and plucking images without attribution will land you in hot water sooner or later, so it’s best to have all bases covered before you do anything. Also, it’s good karma to show where they originally came from.

Critical Search Skills Students Should Know There is a new digital divide on the horizon. It is not based around who has devices and who does not, but instead the new digital divide will be based around students who know how to effectively find and curate information and those who do not. Helene Blowers has come up with seven ideas about the new digital divide – four of them, the ones I felt related to searching, are listed below.

Plagiarism In The Classroom: Teaching Students About Plagiarism For avoiding plagiarism lesson plans … ReadWriteThink provides teachers with a lesson plan for instructing students on the definition of plagiarism, the importance of citing sources, acceptable methods for paraphrasing and more. Literacy Matters has an article for teachers on developing the online research skills of students. In the paraphrasing section toward the bottom, readers will find links to six sites with teacher-specific information on teaching plagiarism avoidance.

A Guide to Little-Known Image Collections with Millions of Free, Hi-Res Images I’m often asked where to go to find high-quality and hi-resolution still images for reuse so I’ve put together this guide. There have been several new image collections that have opened up to the public just within the past year that not many people are aware of yet, but they offer access to thousands, or in some cases millions of outstanding photographs that can be downloaded for free. Here’s a quick guide to finding those collections. The Metropolitan Museum of Art Last month, the Metropolitan Museum of Art made over 400,000 images available for free download for non-commercial use as a part of its Open Access for Scholarly Content initiative. Teaching Screenagers:Character Education for the Digital Age Our current technological trajectory promises unfathomable, roller-coaster innovation with no braking system. While the ride is exciting, it moves so quickly that we typically don't have time to think about the possible unintended consequences that might accompany it. The result is that we find ourselves unable to effectively respond to hot-button issues like cyberbullying and sexting because they seem to come out of nowhere.

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