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Netsmartz - Educators

Netsmartz - Educators

http://www.netsmartz.org/Educators

Related:  Cyber Safety Professional Development for MC TechDigital CitizenshipDigital CitizenshipmhsullivInteresting Stories

Webonauts Academy - Teachers Because it addresses issues of web safety‚ information literacy and digital citizenship‚ Webonauts Internet Academy can be a great tool for classrooms and school media centers. Teachers‚ librarians and technology coordinators can support student learning by using the game in the following ways: As a warm-up activity to a unit on cybersafety.The game is a helpful lead-in to a discussion about profiles and what’s appropriate to include and share with others. The same is true for the topic of credibility and the importance of verifying sources of information. K-12 Digital Citizenship Curriculum Navigating cyberbullying, privacy, safety, and other digital dilemmas are a real challenge for schools. But technology also provides incredible opportunities for students to learn, connect, create, and collaborate in ways never before imagined. Your school can build a positive school culture that supports the safe and responsible use of technology with Common Sense Education's K-12 Digital Citizenship Curriculum. Students can build skills around critical thinking, ethical discussion, and decision making. And you and your school can join thousands of others across the globe by getting recognized for your efforts. Our turnkey curriculum includes comprehensive resources for students, like lesson plans, student digital interactives, and assessments, as well as professional development for teachers and materials for family education.

The Educator’s Guide to Social Media Click here for The Educator’s Guide to Social Media (PDF) The Educator’s Guide to Social Media explains how educators can use social media in class and in their personal and professional lives while enhancing — not risking — their professional reputation. Press release about the guide If you’d like to reprint multiple copies, please click here. Safety advice for major social networking services: Webonauts Academy - Parents Webonauts Internet Academy is more than a game. It’s an opportunity to engage your child in what it means to be a “digital citizen” — someone who respects others on the web and in everyday encounters away from the screen. To get the most out of the game‚ consider doing the following:

Cyber Safety / Digital Citizenship Digital Footprints and Digital Citizenship DEFINITION of Digital Footprint: A word used to describe the trail, traces, or "footprints" that people leave online. Digital life is both public and permanent. Everything we do online creates digital footprints that migrate and persist. Something that happens on the spur of the moment - a funny picture, an angry post - can resurface years later.

Learning Through Reflection Edited by Arthur L. Costa and Bena Kallick by Arthur L. Costa and Bena Kallick Reflection has many facets. Where can I find advice on Internet Safety to help me protect my children? - There is a dazzling array of helpline and support websites with advice on internet safety available to parents online. A parent may well be at a loss to find a useful site so we’ve gathered some here that may of use. Internet Safety Help and Advice Make IT Secure (www.makeitsecure.org) – This Irish website provides information on how to protect your computer and how to safely enjoy the benefits of connecting to the internet. Kid Smart (www.kidsmart.org.uk) – is an award winning practical internet safety programme website for schools, young people, parents, and agencies, produced by the children’s internet charity Childnet International.

Cyberbullying Toolkit An Anti-Cyberbullying Toolkit for Educators This free toolkit has the resources schools need to take an effective stand against cyberbullying. Rely on it to start your year off right. Each occurrence of cyberbullying hurts students, disrupts classrooms, and impacts your school's culture and community. So how should you handle it?

What does an instructional designer do? In the past few months, I’ve been asked by a number of different people what an instructional designer does and how to get into the field. I love instructional design because it is a field where I am constantly learning and I have a great variety in what I do. I use so many different skills—writing, web design, graphics, collaboration, planning, plus of course how people learn. Since this question has come up more than once, I thought it would be useful to collect all the information I have emailed people privately and post it here. Faux Paw's Adventures in the Internet Faux Paws Adventures in the Internet teaches kids the basics of Internet safety: how to keep personal information safe, to keep away from Internet strangers, and to go to an adult for help when they see anything online that makes them uncomfortable. Learn more and get involved: Playlists:Faux Paw the Techno Cat On Cyber Safety for Kids: Tips: Media-trician: Net Safety: Educators: Language: and Reputation: Safe Quick Tips:

5 Email Etiquette Tips for Students - Some for Teachers Too One of my pet peeves is receiving an email that from someone that just launches into a request without stopping to address me by name. For years I have told students that I won't reply to emails if they don't write "Hi Mr. Byrne" or something similar to start their emails. Many of my colleagues have similar policies, I'm sure that many of you do too. Using your recipient's name is one of five good email etiquette tips for students featured in the video embedded below.

Evaluating Technology Use in the Classroom Evaluating the use of technology in a classroom environment is not something most administrators are trained to do. It is easy to walk into a classroom and see that every student is using a computer, but how do you really assess if and what type of learning is taking place? In the past, I have had administrators tell me “I walked into the teacher’s room and all the students were on laptops.” As though just the site of students working on laptops meant they were engaged in the learning process. I have been trying to wrap my head around a simple way for administrators to evaluate the use of technology in the classroom (a thank you to Dennis Harter who got me thinking about this).

StopBullying.gov Cyberbullying happens when kids bully each other through electronic technology. Find out why cyberbullying is different from traditional bullying, what you can do to prevent it, and how you can report it when it happens. What is Cyberbullying?

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