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Curriculum: Understanding YouTube & Digital Citizenship – Google in Education

Curriculum: Understanding YouTube & Digital Citizenship – Google in Education
Overview We have devised an interactive curriculum aimed to support teachers of secondary students (approximately ages 13-17). The curriculum helps educate students on topics like: YouTube’s policies How to report content on YouTube How to protect their privacy online How to be responsible YouTube community members How to be responsible digital citizens We hope that students and educators gain useful skills and a holistic understanding about responsible digital citizenship, not only on YouTube, but in all online activity. Lessons in English Below is a list of lessons, and the recommended flow for delivery. Or you can download the Full Teacher's Guide or the Full Set of Slides in PDF. Lessons in Additional Languages Below is a list of lessons and resources in additional languages beyond English: Learn more To learn more visit the Classroom videos page of this website, where you can find links to information on:

http://www.google.com/edu/teachers/youtube/curric/index.html

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Netiquette, by Virginia Shea, page 7 for Netiquette by Virginia Shea published by Albion Books Front CoverTitle Page 3Copyright Page 4Author's Dedication 5Table of Contents 7Foreword by Guy Kawasaki 11Acknowledgements 13A Note on Terminology 15 Part IIntroduction to Netiquette Chapter 1When in Cyberspace... 19 Chapter 2The Many Domains of Cyberspace 25 The Internet 25 Commercial online services 28 The Power of Educational Technology: A Design Thinking approach to Digital Citizenship Design Thinking is a problem solving methodology used by people all over the world to come up with new ideas. Recently there has been a lot of discussion about how to integrate this approach into education. This summer I took two Online courses to learn more about the process. I am very interested in ways to use this approach in my own teaching. This fall I decided to apply this approach to my 7th grade Digital Citizenship unit which focuses on cyberbullying. It worked really well.

Digital Citizenship Graphic Digital citizenship is " the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use."It is the combination of technical and social skills that enable a person to be successful and safe in the information age. Just like literacy and numeracy initiatives which provide people with the skills to ' participate in the work force, digital literacy has become an essential skill to be a confident, connected, and actively involved life long learner.' I personally recommend that teachers and educators should, throughout the entire school year, devote special sessions to just teaching students about Digital Citizenship. Students need to learn how to act appropriately while using the net and there are several activities and resources to help you do that with them. Check out this section to access some of these resources.

Interview: Sherry Turkle, Author of 'Alone Together' As soon as Sherry Turkle arrived at the studio for her Fresh Air interview, she realized she'd forgotten her phone. "I realized I'd left it behind, and I felt a moment of Oh my god ... and I felt it kind of in the pit of my stomach," she tells Terry Gross. That feeling of emotional dependence on digital devices is the focus of Turkle's research. Her book, Alone Together, explores how new technology is changing the way we communicate with one another.

Twitter and Facebook are not where kids are heading. Meet Kik and Oink. There is pervasive notion that the issues today are the same as those even three years ago. They might continue to sell this obsolete rhetoric to Edlandians, but kids are using very different networks – and here’s why. Kids are being given hand-held devices. iPod touch, low end Androids and so on. They are no using desktops, laptops or TABLETs. If Edlandians paid attention to advertising data and sales data as much as they do their Twitter feed-bowls they’d know this. Excerpted from Netiquette by Virginia Shea The Core Rules of Netiquette are excerpted from the book Netiquette by Virginia Shea. Click on each rule for elaboration. Introduction Rule 1: Remember the Human Rule 2: Adhere to the same standards of behavior online that you follow in real life Rule 3: Know where you are in cyberspace Rule 4: Respect other people's time and bandwidth Rule 5: Make yourself look good online Rule 6: Share expert knowledge Rule 7: Help keep flame wars under control Rule 8: Respect other people's privacy Rule 9: Don't abuse your power Rule 10: Be forgiving of other people's mistakes Next page ...Previous page ...Core Rules ...Netiquette Contents

Welcome, Educators Administrators and teachers are urgently looking for a proven system that will guide them through the complexities of Web 2.0. Too often, events like cyberbullying, sexting, plagiarizing and hacking push litigious chaos into the forefront of technology adoption, essentially stunting the development of digital citizenship progress. In response to this real and palpable need, iKeepSafe offers you these resources: Dive Into Data Privacy and Security • iKeepSafe Privacy: builds confidence around how technology companies are handling student data. • Digital Compliance and Student Privacy: A Roadmap for Schools: Outlines steps to implementing privacy and security compliance programs. • Data Privacy and Schools: Outlining the Conversation: Examines challenges related to managing data privacy and security in schools. • General Overview and Positioning Paper: iKeepSafe and Data Security: Discusses security protections for data collected by educational institutions. Brush Up on Hot Topics

Kids and Media: Netiquette As in all public places, there are certain generally accepted rules for behaviour and etiquette on the Internet. It is important for both adults and children to know these rules, and we recommend parents to make sure that their children follow the rules in all their online activities. Guidelines for netiquette Follow the same rules for good behaviour as you do in real life. Treat others the way you would like to be treated. Remind yourself that there is a person on the other end of your message.

Bing Launches Its Election Site, Lets You Filter News By Political Perspective Better late than never. With less than two weeks to go before the U.S. presidential election on November 6, Microsoft’s Bing just unveiled Bing Elections. The site features news results from major U.S. publications that can be filtered by political preference (right, left, center), as well as an interactive map with election results and sentiment analysis across key issues based on data from Twitter and Facebook. It’s surprising that Bing is only launching this site so late in the game, but the result is actually quite interesting. Australian national 13 Project helping kids stay safe online Library associations across Australia have announced the 13 Project, to strengthen the participation of school library staff in schools’ efforts to help keep their students safer online. Every parent fears their child being bullied, and cyber-bullying has added an extra layer to the threat. The 13 Project recognizes the special role of school libraries as a place where students often access online resources, and the opportunity library staff have to promote cyber-safety information. The 13 Project complements other school initiatives to deal with cyber-safety by positioning school library staff as having an important role in keeping students safe online.

Nine Elements Nine Themes of Digital Citizenship Digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use. 1. Digital Access: full electronic participation in society. Digital Citizenship Week: 6 Resources for Educators Considering how ubiquitous smartphones and tablets have become, especially in high school and middle school, questions about managing use and educating students about digital etiquette are on a lot of educators' minds. This October, Common Sense Media is sponsoring Digital Citizenship Week from October 16 to October 22. And we wanted to pull together some of the best resources to help educators talk about digital responsibility and safety online. Here, you'll find resources that cover today's digital landscape, ideas for student activities, and strategies for engaging parents. There are plenty of valuable resources for educators and parents to share, but here are six of my favorites:

Netiquette: e-guide The online learning series E-guides on social interaction and communicating electronically Within the email message, mouse over red text to find the commandments of good email netiquette.Look for all ten! Communicating clearly on the Internet without creating misunderstandings is a challenge.One problem is that you haven't any facial expressions, body language, or environment to help you express yourself; another that there is little "give and take" for developing what you mean to say or are discussing These guidelines hopefully will help you: Practically Applied: A Month of Creation in #digcit One of the struggles that I have had teaching computer classes and even adult professional development over the years is the artificial nature of the exercise. While there are a few notable exceptions and tried & true lessons, the teaching of computers is typically taught as a series of artificial "problems" and walk-through solutions. Students for the most part recognize this and go through the motions to a greater or lesser extent depending on how much they value their grades. Thus, when we decided to recast the curriculum for Computer Applications as a course in Digital Citizenship (#digccit) based heavily on the ISTE National Education Technology Standards for Students, one of our implicit goals was to make the student experience more real and more relevant. Context: Brebeuf Jesuit runs a modified-modular schedule.

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