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Democracyos.org

Democracyos.org

http://democracyos.org/

Related:  e-DemocratieGovernment & Political ScienceEcoCoWebTools neutres Après DEMocratiques - after democracyRéflechir ensemble & dire ce qui compte

Out in the Open: An Open Source Website That Gives Voters a Platform to Influence Politicians This is the decade of the protest. The Arab Spring. The Occupy Movement. And now the student demonstrations in Taiwan. Argentine political scientist Pia Mancini says we’re caught in a “crisis of representation.” Propaganda - Wikipedia Propaganda is "information, especially of a biased or misleading nature, used to promote a political cause or point of view".[1] Propaganda is often associated with the psychological mechanisms of influencing and altering the attitude of a population toward a specific cause, position or political agenda in an effort to form a consensus to a standard set of belief patterns.[2] In the 2010s, the term propaganda is associated with a manipulative approach, but propaganda historically was a neutral descriptive term.[2][3] A wide range of materials and media are used for conveying propaganda messages, which changed as new technologies were invented, including paintings, cartoons, posters, pamphlets, films, radio shows, TV shows, and websites. Etymology[edit]

The Sharing Economy Is About Desperation Wired's cover story this month is about the rise of the "sharing economy" — a Silicon Valley–invented term used to describe the basket of start-ups (Uber, Lyft, Airbnb, et al.) that allow users to rent their labor and belongings to strangers. Jason Tanz attributes the success of these start-ups to the invention of a "set of digi­tal tools that enable and encourage us to trust our fellow human beings," such as bidirectional rating systems, background checks, frictionless payment systems, and platforms that encourage buyers and sellers to get to know each other face-to-face before doing business. Tanz's thesis isn't wrong — these innovations have certainly made a difference. But it leaves out an important part of the story. Namely, the sharing economy has succeeded in large part because the real economy has been struggling. More telling is what's happened to real wages, which have fallen for middle- and low-income people since the recession:

E-Voting Taskforce - E2D International Members of this task force are in charge of helping develop an open-source e-democracy system to be adopted by any E2D party or other organizations for electronic direct democratic decision-making. Basic general information about solutions related to e-voting: authentication, voting, amongst others. Requirements (in construction)

To thrive, we must get radically political – not just commit to private actions for happiness Last week, I attended an evening presenting Richard Layard and David Clark’s new book Thrive: The Power of Evidence-Based Psychological Therapies hosted by Action for Happiness, which Layard co-founded. Underlining the core thesis of their book, Layard and Clark spoke about the immense potential for evidence-based psychological therapies to alleviate the burden of mental illness in the UK; if only we invested more in these services. They encouraged us to write to MPs to ask Commissioners to do so. This is in the tailwind of Mind releasing a report last month in which Local Authorities were rightly lambasted for spending ‘unacceptably low’ amounts on mental ill-health prevention services[1]. While funding for mental ill-health represents only 1.36% of the national budget, we spend four times as much on anti-smoking initiatives. Yet suffering from mental illness can shorten lives more than smoking and is the single largest source of burden of disease in the UK.

Tous les blogs du site Textfor linebreak add 2 spaces at end, _italic_ or **bold** End a line with two spaces to add a <br/> linebreak: How do I love thee? Let me count the ways Two Swedish economists foresaw the backlash against globalisation – here’s how to mitigate it The first article in our series Globalisation Under Pressure looks at work from the 1930s that anticipated the backlash against globalisation. Economists Eli Heckscher (1879-1952) and Bertil Ohlin (1899-1979) died more than three decades ago. But it’s fair to assume that neither would have been surprised by the underlying causes of Donald Trump’s election as president of the United States, or Brexit for that matter. Their Heckscher-Ohlin (H-O) model of international trade – developed at the Stockholm School of Economics in the 1930s – clearly predicted today’s middle-class discontent bellowing at the ballot box. The two Swedes recognised the simple but too-often-overlooked soft underbelly of global trade and growth: prosperity doesn’t distribute evenly.

What Makes or Breaks Startups in the Sharing Economy? Insurance Rates As recently as last year, it wasn’t clear that RelayRides’ business made financial sense. The company, which lets strangers rent one another’s cars, was growing — acquiring rivals like Wheelz and expanding into new markets. It was charging its users a healthy vigorish; car owners paid the company 25% of every rental fee, while renters kicked in an additional 15%.

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