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What To Expect From Libraries in the 21st Century: Pam Sandlian Smith at TEDxMileHigh

What To Expect From Libraries in the 21st Century: Pam Sandlian Smith at TEDxMileHigh

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fa6ERdxyYdo

Related:  Teaching StrategiesFuture of librariesTeacher LibrarianmelaniebkTeacher librarian

Keeping Up with New Tools There are hundreds and hundreds of web-based tools available! There seem to be a dozen or more new tools online every day! Here are some of the newest ones that I'm exploring (from my Pinterest boards):Donna BaumbachWebTools-New 2 Me!Follow On Many of these have potential for increasing our own productivity, for enhancing our teaching, for organizing our information resources and/or for helping students learn. How to do keep on top of these new tools?

What Does the Next-Generation School Library Look Like? At a time when public libraries are starting to offer everything from community gardening plots to opportunities to check out humans for conversations, some school libraries are similarly re-evaluating their roles and expanding their offerings. Case in point: Monticello High School in Charlottesville, Virginia. When librarian Joan Ackroyd arrived there four years ago, she found an environment very different from the “engaging, creative, fun” elementary and middle school libraries to which she was accustomed. “Its library was none of those things,” she recalls. “It was a traditional, quiet research space.” Projects to Engage Middle School Readers It's my fault. I'll admit it. During my eight years in the classroom, I ruined at least two amazing literary works by assigning horrifically dull reading projects. My only hope is that those middle school students, whose enthusiasm I quashed, found another way to become passionate about literature. Peanuts raises some interesting questions about the value of reading projects.

Goodreads Blog The Top 100 Young Adult Books of All Time Posted by Jade on September 10, 2015 It's September and to get you in the book-loving, back-to-school mood, we've gone through thousands of Young Adult books to come up with this list of the Top 100 YA Books of all time. These aren't books that your teachers told you to read. (Though there are a few of those in here, too!) No, this list is the Top 100 YA Books as determined by you, the Goodreads members who truly love YA literature.

ites - EOL LaGarde Craven Feb2013 Connect: @jenniferlagarde #ncdpi_dtlContact: jennifer.lagarde@dpi.nc.govBlog: www.librarygirl.net What is a "21st Century" Librarian? Let's take a look at several visions of what today's School Library Media Coordinator should look like. Best Applications For Annotating Websites I’m always on the look-out for web tools that can mimc a key instructional strategy I use with students in the classroom — having them use post-it notes to annotate books or articles so they can demonstrate their use of reading strategies (asking questions, making connections, etc.). I thought it would a good subject for another “The Best…” list. In order to make this list, it had to be available free-of-charge, be accessible to English Language Learners, and not require any downloads of any kind. Here are my choices for The Best Applications For Annotating Websites (not in order of preference):

School libraries face a bleak future as leaders try to balance the books I remember my school library: it had two floors with spiral staircases, individual study cubicles and a classroom on the upper floor. It was attached to the sixth form block, giving the students easy access to a study facility. One particular memory is of a Puffin Books sale – I could even tell you the books I bought (and still have). This was in the days before personal computing so the only source of information – apart from other people, TV or radio – was books. Frequent Citation Questions EasyBib is here to make citing sources and creating bibliographies easier. We’ve compiled some of our most frequent citation questions here. If you still have questions, you can always contact us. How Do I Cite a/an… Tweet? Learning Standards & Program Guidelines Review and Revision For the first time in decades AASL will be using a multi-layered survey, data, and research approach to revise and rewrite its learning standards and program guidelines for your profession. To ensure the standards meet the needs of the entire community it is critical that we hear from you! Visit the FAQ section for more information on how you can get involved. Overview | Project Plan Milestones | Frequently Asked Questions While the launch of new standards and guidelines is scheduled for fall 2017, the current AASL standards will not “go away” with the release of new standards.

The School Library Media Specialist: Library Media Program: Introduction "Every school is different, and every school library is a reflection of its own unique school culture." Richard Turner (2006) in The Whole School Library Handbook, New Library World; 17(5/6); 263-265. How do I know if I'm reaching my goals? EDU 609 - Antioch University Seattle School Library Certification Program Helen Adams, a former Wisconsin school librarian and technology coordinator, is currently an onlineinstructor in the School Library Media Endorsement Program of Antioch University-Seattle. Helen's published works include numerous article in professional journals. Additionally, she has written Protecting Intellectual Freedom and Privacy in Your School Library (Libraries Unlimited 2013), Ensuring Intellectual Freedom and Access to Information in the School Library Media Program (Libraries Unlimited 2008), Privacy in the 21st Century: Issues for Public, School, and Academic Libraries (co-author, Libraries Unlimited 2005), and is a contributor to the forthcoming The Many Faces in School Library Leadership , 2nd edition (Libraries Unlimited 2017). A former AASL President in 2001-2002, she is currently a member of the ALA Intellectual Freedom Committee, the ALA Privacy Subcommittee, the Knowledge Quest Advisory Board, the ALA American Libraries Advisory Board, and the ALA Nominating Committee.

How Libraries Fit in the Future of Learning Back when I was in school, libraries were all about books — books, books and more books. During my frequent visits to the library, I would pore through encyclopedias and fill out countless checkout cards before heading home with a backpack full of reading material. Of course, teachers also scheduled regular media time so students could use the library’s computer pod, but technology wasn’t nearly as integral to the library experience as it is today. The advent of the digital age had a profound impact on school libraries. Expanding Internet use gave students access to academic texts from their home computers and, later, from mobile devices. That change has forced the school library to shrug off its title of knowledge gatekeeper and embrace its role as a steward of collaboration and innovation.

Navigating the online information maze: should students trust Wikipedia? Being literate used to be about knowing how to read. In the 21st century it also means knowing how to negotiate through the torrent of information coming at you from all directions. Information Fatigue Syndrome, or “Infoglut” is a defining issue of modern life. For students particularly, it is getting harder to find useful, quality information. Information literacy to digital literacy

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