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Copyright & Copyleft - Home - Welcome to Copyright and Copyleft

Copyright & Copyleft - Home - Welcome to Copyright and Copyleft
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Why Your Favorite Video Just Disappeared From YouTube YouTube is the most popular video platform in the world, but that doesn’t make it exempt from intellectual property laws. In fact, with the spotlight on YouTube, it makes it even more vulnerable. This means that any video which infringes trademark or copyright laws can be removed from YouTube, often without warning. These removals can be erroneous, impacting both the content creator and the viewer. YouTube itself is vulnerable too, having been embroiled in a legal battle against Viacom since 2007, with the media company claiming that the online video platform turned a blind eye to copyright laws during its inception. Let’s take a look at what all of this means, some examples of content claims, and how it all affects you. Explaining Intellectual Property Intellectual property laws are a murky business. A trademark distinguishes your brand from a competitor. Trademark ownership depends on the context and use. On the other hand, copyright doesn’t have to be registered. Copyright on YouTube

:. Copyright Advisory Network :: Copyright Advisory Network .: Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: copyright resources August 12, 2014 Now that the new school year is about to start, it would be great to devote a session with your students where you can talk to them about issues related to copyright and proper use of digital artifacts from the net. This will definitely help them make better and informed decisions as to the kind of materials they are allowed to use in their work and provide them with practice on the different ways they can appropriately credit sources. This resourceful page embeds a wide variety of materials to use in this regard, browse through the items featured there and bookmark the ones you plan to use with your students. I am also sharing with you this wonderful graphic that debunks 5 myths about copyright infringement. You can print it off and use it in your class as well.

15 Lesson Plans For Making Students Better Online Researchers Google is usually one of the first places students turn to when tasked with an assignment. Whether it’s for research, real-time results, or just a little digital exploration … it’s important they know how to properly Google. Lucky for teachers (and students, of course), Google has a handy set of lesson plans that are just waiting to be unleashed upon the leaders of tomorrow. While I understand there’s a LOT more to research than just Googling, it’s important to note that this is where nearly all students start their research. Therefore, it’s a critical skill if they’re going to start down the right paths. Below are 15 lesson plans courtesy of Google designed to make students better online researchers. Check out the useful Lesson Plan Map too to see how all these lessons fit together and what skills they teach. Beginner Level Pick the best words to use in academic searching, whether students are beginning with a full question or a topic of just a few words. Intermediate Level Advanced Level

Free To Use and Share: Resources To Help Teach Kids (and Adults!) About Copyright and Creative Commons I've gotten a few requests lately for resources on how to teach kids (and adults!) about copyright. I've written before about how I don't think any lesson on copyright can be effective without an emphasis on creative commons and helping students choose licenses for their own work. Still, there are plenty of good resources out there to help start these conversations or that can serve as reminders as you help create a culture of creativity and attribution at your school. And even though there already exists in my mind a resource titled "A Zombie Librarian's Guide to Copyright," as of this moment, that resource is yet to exist anywhere else, so... I thought I'd curate a collection of other resources to share in the meantime. To that end, I've also written before about how much love Edcanvas - a tool which recently changed its name to Blendspace. Enjoy! Direct link to this blendspace.

Is copyright law in China any different from in the United States? A group of Chinese writers is accusing Google of copyright infringement after the company scanned their books as part of its massive Google Library project, China Daily reported Wednesday. We're used to hearing about China failing to enforce U.S. copyright laws—but not the reverse. Is copyright law in China any different from in the United States? Not substantially so. China has signed onto both major international copyright treaties—the century-old Berne Convention and the decade-old Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, orTRIPS Agreement—which set minimum standards for copyright regulation. Under these agreements, writers, musicians, visual artists, and filmmakers are granted "automatic" rights to any work they produce—i.e., they don't have to formally register a trademark. But copyright conventions in China and America are not identical. China, furthermore, is much more lax about enforcing copyright laws than the United States.

Copyright Crash Course The Copyright Crash Course was created by Georgia Harper and is currently maintained by UT Libraries. The Course is arranged into several sections that allow users to explore certain areas of copyright law individually or as a group. The Course was originally created with faculty in mind, but can be used by anyone who is interested in understanding and managing their copyrights. If you need to take the Crash Course tutorial & test, click here (UT affiliation required). Version 1 of the Copyright Crash Course is available via Texas ScholarWorks. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Copyright Law, Intellectual Property, & Trademark Law Free Science Fiction Classics on the Web: Huxley, Orwell, Asimov, Gaiman & Beyond Today we're bringing you a roundup of some of the great Science Fiction, Fantasy and Dystopian classics available on the web. And what better way to get started than with Aldous Huxley reading a dramatized recording of his 1932 novel, Brave New World. The reading aired on the CBS Radio Workshop in 1956. You can listen to Part 1 here and Part 2 here. (FYI: You can download Huxley's original work -- as opposed to the dramatized version -- in audio by signing up for a Free Trial with Audible.com, and that applies to other books mentioned here as well.) Little known fact. In 1910, J. Stephen King and Joyce Carol Oates -- they both pay homage to H.P. Philip K. eTexts (find download instructions here) Audio “Beyond Lies the Wub” – Free MP3“Beyond the Door” – Free MP3“Second Variety” – Free MP3 Zip File – Stream Online“The Defenders” - Free MP3“The Hanging Stranger” – Free MP3“The Variable Man” – Free MP3 Zip File – Stream Online“Tony and the Beetles” – MP3 Part 1 – MP3 Part II Audio & Video

Copyright Infringement: 5 Myths vs Facts Embed Code For hosted site: Click the code to copy <div class='visually_embed'><img class='visually_embed_infographic' src=' alt='Copyright Infringement: 5 Myths vs Facts' /><div class='visually_embed_cycle'><span>by </span><a target='_blank' href=' For wordpress.com: <div class='visually_embed'><iframe width='1' height='1' style='width: 1px ! Customize size

The Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education Coordinated by: The Media Education Lab, Temple University The Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property, American University Washington College of Law The Center for Media & Social Impact, American University With funding from: The John D. and Catherine T. And additional support from: The Ford Foundation, by way of the Future of Public Media Project Introduction What This Is This document is a code of best practices that helps educators using media literacy concepts and techniques to interpret the copyright doctrine of fair use. This guide identifies five principles that represent the media literacy education community’s current consensus about acceptable practices for the fair use of copyrighted materials, wherever and however it occurs: in K–12 education, in higher education, in nonprofit organizations that offer programs for children and youth, and in adult education. What This Isn't This code of best practices does not tell you the limits of fair use rights. Fair Use Conclusion

A Copyright-Friendly Toolkit However fabulous Creative Commons and Public Domain content may be, sometimes you really need to use copyrighted material. Say you plan to comment on popular media or current events. For instance, you may be planning to critique the portrayal of Native Americans in commercial films. You may use copyrighted content without asking permission if you believe that your use falls under the doctrine known as Fair Use. In general, when you transform original content, repurpose it, and add value to it in your own remix, you may be able to claim the use fair. According to American University’s Center for Media and Social Impact, these two tests or questions help you plan whether to use the copyrighted work of others without asking permission: Did the unlicensed use "transform" the material taken from the copyrighted work by using it for a different purpose than that of the original, or did it just repeat the work for the same intent and value as the original? American University.

Copyright-CopyWrong The Educators' Lean and Mean No FAT Guide to Fair Use By Hall Davidson You can't afford to ignore the law, but neither can you afford to overlook the needs of your students. The good news for educators heading into a new millennium is that abiding by--and helping to shape--fair use copyright principles and guidelines is really not that difficult. For help, read on. Is it legal for students to use copyrighted clips from videos, CDs, or the Internet to create multimedia reports? These are the sorts of questions that abound in technology-rich schools today. In those gray or controversial areas in which legal precedents have not yet been set, common sense and a willingness to blaze new and ethical trails may be your best guides. Those of you using technology for instruction may be pleasantly surprised at what is legal and ethical. The Digital Millennium Copyright Act signed into law in October of 1998 updated aspects of copyright law. So what is the bottom line? Here's how it goes.

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