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13 Vital Reminders For Writers

13 Vital Reminders For Writers
Writing is tough work. If I may be so bold as to attempt a simile, I’d say that it’s like walking through a dark forest, but with your legs tied together. So in actuality you’re not really walking at all. But sort of hopping. Oh yes, and there’s a little devil perched upon your shoulder whispering sweet doubts in your ear. And the worst thing of all is that he’s composing his insults more poetically than you ever could. To battle this devil, here are 13 punchy quotes that will help you remain focused as you hop through that dark forest.

Write & Get Paid Get Paid $100 Do you want to earn money online? Listverse was built on the efforts of readers just like you. Readers who didn’t have any experience as writers but decided to put a list together and send it in. So here is the deal: We will pay you $100 for your efforts. It works like this: You write your list (10 items per list minimum), you send it in, we reply and say “Great—we’ll publish it” and send you $100 by PayPal (don’t have an account? Either way you win—your list will be read by us and reviewed, and if it’s amazing it will appear on the front page of Listverse to be read by millions of people a month! We can not accept lists from writers who do not have a PayPal account; this is non-negotiable. The Rules The rules are really pretty simple. Oh—and there’s one more thing: If you have a blog, a Twitter account, or a book you want to promote, mention it in the submissions form and we will stick it at the bottom of your list. Pictures and Video Ready to start?

The Ultimate Guide to Writing Better Than You Normally Do. Writing is a muscle. Smaller than a hamstring and slightly bigger than a bicep, and it needs to be exercised to get stronger. Think of your words as reps, your paragraphs as sets, your pages as daily workouts. Think of your laptop as a machine like the one at the gym where you open and close your inner thighs in front of everyone, exposing both your insecurities and your genitals. Procrastination is an alluring siren taunting you to google the country where Balki from Perfect Strangers was from, and to arrange sticky notes on your dog in the shape of hilarious dog shorts. The blank white page. Mark Twain once said, “Show, don’t tell.” Finding a really good muse these days isn’t easy, so plan on going through quite a few before landing on a winner. There are two things more difficult than writing. It’s so easy to hide in your little bubble, typing your little words with your little fingers on your little laptop from the comfort of your tiny chair in your miniature little house.

Writing Tips: The 7 Deadly Sins of Writing In a thought-provoking, writing tips based ThrillerFest panel provided by WD managing editor Zachary Petit, four popular authors shared what they believe to be the deadly sins of the writing craft. Here are seven of their offerings. Have you committed any of them? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. The Writing Mysteries & Thrillers That Sell Collection(Only 48 left!) Do you love reading and writing mysteries or thrillers? The Writing Mysteries and Thrillers That Sell Premium Collection Includes: Howdunit: Book of Poisons by Anne Louise Bannon and Serita Stevens D.P. Order this Writing Mysteries and Thrillers Collection now! Thanks for visiting The Writer’s Dig blog. Brian A.

One red paperclip The paperclip that Kyle MacDonald traded for a house. The website One red paperclip was created by Canadian blogger Kyle MacDonald, who bartered his way from a single red paperclip to a house in a series of fourteen online trades over the course of a year.[1] MacDonald was inspired by the childhood game Bigger, Better, and the site received a considerable amount of notice for tracking the transactions. "A lot of people have been asking how I've stirred up so much publicity around the project, and my simple answer is: 'I have no idea'", he told the BBC.[2] Trading timeline[edit] MacDonald made his first trade, a red paper clip for a fish-shaped pen, on July 14, 2005. He reached his goal of trading up to a house with the fourteenth transaction, trading a movie role for a house. See also[edit] Straw Millionaire References[edit] Notes[edit] Bibliography[edit] External links[edit] www.randomhouse.co.uk – Random House One Red Paperclip book page

Guest Blog: K.M. Weiland Shares 10 Ways to Motivate Yourself to Write | Helium Blog 10 Ways to Motivate Yourself to Write By K.M. Weiland Writers write. 1. Who says bribes are a bad thing? 2. Generally speaking, threats aren’t going to be as psychologically helpful as rewards. 3. Make writing as easy on yourself as possible by creating a special writing spot. 4. Nothing beats a schedule for carving out writing time in your busy day. 5. If you enjoy writing to music, create a writing playlist that has special significance for your work-in-progress. 6. Sometimes the looming mountain of all those unwritten words can be daunting. 7. If schedules aren’t your thing (and even if they are), give yourself permission to be spontaneous. 8. If you’re having difficulty maintaining consistency in your writing schedule, bring in a partner on the job. 9. Eliminate as many distractions as you can. 10. The infernal internal editor is a valuable asset—but only when editing. K.M. Learn more about K.M Facebook Twitter Blog: Helping Writers Become Authors Website: kmweiland.com Behold the Dawn

How to Finish What You Start: A Five-Step Plan for Writers How to finish what you start Do you have a bunch of first chapters tucked away in a drawer – for seven different novels? Is there a folder full of abandoned short stories on your computer? Have you left a trail of abandoned blogs around the internet? Did your ebook fizzle out after a few pages? Most writers have been there … again, and again, and again. Maybe it’s the same for you. No-one’s going to buy a half-written novel. Here’s how: Step #1: Stop Starting New Projects Believe me, I know how tempting it is to grab that new idea and run with it. Do it: Decide, right now, that you won’t start anything new until you’ve finished something off. Step #2: Assess Your Current Projects Take a long, hard look at all your current works-in-progress. Is there anything that’s just not worth completing? Rather than keeping old projects hanging around, ditch any that have died on you: As with all dead things, holding onto it won’t keep it alive or change the fact that it’s useful time has come and gone.

The 50 Best Movies on Netflix Instant We love the convenience of streaming movies on Netflix Instant, but we don’t always love the navigating through the countless films in the service’s ever-expanding catalog to find something to watch. So we’ve compiled our list of recommended titles for you—whether you love classics, comedies, documentaries or just good ol’ fashioned kung-fu. The genres vary greatly here—and range in age from brand new to 87-years-old—but all 50 of these films come with the Paste stamp of approval. 50. 49. 48. 47. 46. 45. 44. 43. 42. 41. 40. 39. 38. 37. 36. 35. 34. 33. 32. 31. 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 DaysYear: 2007Director: Christian Mungui With eerily realistic performances and stunning direction, 4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days combines an uncomfortably forthright discussion of abortion with long, virtuosic handheld camera takes.

13 Writing Tips Twenty years ago, a friend and I walked around downtown Portland at Christmas. The big department stores: Meier and Frank… Fredrick and Nelson… Nordstroms… their big display windows each held a simple, pretty scene: a mannequin wearing clothes or a perfume bottle sitting in fake snow. But the windows at the J.J. She said the perfect comment at the perfect moment, and I remember it two decades later because it made me laugh. For this essay, my goal is to put more in. Number One: Two years ago, when I wrote the first of these essays it was about my "egg timer method" of writing. Number Two: Your audience is smarter than you imagine. Number Three: Before you sit down to write a scene, mull it over in your mind and know the purpose of that scene. Number Four: Surprise yourself. Number Five: When you get stuck, go back and read your earlier scenes, looking for dropped characters or details that you can resurrect as "buried guns." Number Seven: Let yourself be with Not Knowing.

The Four Essential Stages of Writing Image by photosteve101 In last week’s post, 7 Habits of Serious Writers, I mentioned the importance of actually writing, plus the need to redraft. I thought it’d be worth putting those stages into context – because they’re not all you need for an effective piece. Every finished piece of writing passes through four stages: PlanningDraftingRedraftingEditing Sure, you can publish a blog post without doing any planning, or any rewriting and editing. I wouldn’t call that “finished”, myself. The four stages don’t always have to be tackled in order. But it’s crucial to be clear about what each stage involves. Stage #1: Planning Image by Dvortygirl You’re already planning your writing – whether or not you realise it. Some written pieces don’t need any more planning than that: you’ve got the idea in your head, pretty much complete. When you’re working on a project where you already know the subject matter – an ebook, for instance, or a memoir – then it’s worth planning in some detail. Better Planning

Top 40 Useful Sites To Learn New Skills The web is a powerful resource that can easily help you learn new skills. You just have to know where to look. Sure, you can use Google, Yahoo, or Bing to search for sites where you can learn new skills , but I figured I’d save you some time. Here are the top 40 sites I have personally used over the last few years when I want to learn something new. Hack a Day - Hack a Day serves up fresh hacks (short tutorials) every day from around the web and one in-depth ‘How-To hack’ guide each week.eHow - eHow is an online community dedicated to providing visitors the ability to research, share, and discuss solutions and tips for completing day-to-day tasks and projects.Wired How-To Wiki - Collaborate with Wired editors and help them build their extensive library of projects, hacks, tricks and tips.

Essential Writing Advice for Beginners: An Interview With Kerri Majors Kerri Majors is the editor and founder of YARN, the Young Adult Review Network, an online literary journal of YA short stories, essays, and poetry. As if this role doesn’t keep her busy enough, she is also the author of This Is Not a Writing Manual, a refreshing and candid memoir geared toward young writers. In it, she shares her own trials-by-fire, successes, disappointments, and thoughts on the writing life. This is the perfect book to share with the young writer in your life, and there are plenty of pearls of wisdom and inspiration for writers of all ages, beginners and veterans alike. I sat down with Kerri to chat about what it means to be a writer, what makes for stand-out, top-notch fiction, and the writing mistakes she sees in her role as a fiction editor. —by Rachel Randall, Managing Editor of Writer’s Digest Books Why did you decide to write This Is Not a Writing Manual? I never-ever-EVER thought I would write a book like this. Have you always self-identified as a writer? Rachel

5 Opportunities to Increase Your Writing Productivity (Without Actually Writing) In an ideal world, you’d have many more hours to dedicate to writing. In reality, you carve out what meager “free time” you can, sacrificing things like sleep, a social life, exercise, a clean house, and quality time with friends and family. When your laundry pile resembles a laundry mountain and you haven’t hit the gym in a month, it’s hard to justify spending extra time working on something that doesn’t pay the bills (yet!). Until you can add hours to the day, what’s the solution? (Can writers query multiple agents at the same agency?) Guest column by Donna Gambale, Philadelphia-based YA writer andco-founder of the First Novels Club website. The key is in making the writing time you do have as productive as possible. Here’s how: Every day, there are numerous opportunities to brainstorm about your project to keep it fresh in your mind and allow you to progress more rapidly when you sit down to write. (How to Sell Pieces to Magazines and Newspapers.) Top 5 Brainstorming Opportunities 1. 2.

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