background preloader

Writing Advice

Facebook Twitter

The Wise Sloth formula plot template. January 29, 2011 Below is a story outline.

The Wise Sloth formula plot template

Below that are the terms used in the outline. Generic Story Outline Introduction- Setup-Delivery-Outcome- Cataclysm- Decision- Preparation- Engagement- Neutralization- Template 2. Story template 2 0. Version 3. Long story template copy. Mp formula plot. Formula plot 3. Story templates 3 4. Formula Plot Storyboards. Choose your own adventure templates and prompts. The 36 Adventures of Captain Buigardo: A choose your own adventure formula plot template writing prompt. October 12, 2011 Pick an Introduction:

The 36 Adventures of Captain Buigardo: A choose your own adventure formula plot template writing prompt

Notes on Writing Sitcoms Using a Formula Plot Template. 8 simple formula plot templates. The story begins by introducing the protagonist in a way that reveals his defining characteristics, strengths, weaknesses, life circumstances, motives, and goals.

8 simple formula plot templates

SEGMENT 1 also establishes the setting and tone. Something happens to the protagonist that is out of the ordinary (for the protagonist, not for you). The event should be as apocalyptic as possible. This event throws the protagonist out of his comfort zone. The more disastrous it is for the protagonist the higher the stakes are. The protagonist weighs his options. The protagonist makes a plan of action to address the source of the conflict. How to write sex stories using a formula plot template. Note: This guide doesn’t teach you the way to write pornographic short stories.

How to write sex stories using a formula plot template

There’s no single way to write about sex, and since sex is such an emotional and often spontaneous activity the topic lends itself to free-flowing, spontaneous writing. Having said that, good stories tend to follow a logical progression of events based on cause and effect. Good writing also caters to human psychology; readers want realistic characters with reasonable motivation, rising action, a climax and closure at the end. The Mechanic: a parable about story telling. This is the story about how I learned the most important lessons of my life, a lesson that turned my life around.

The Mechanic: a parable about story telling

When I was just a little boy my pappa would take me with him when we needed to have our family car looked at. The only mechanic in town was a real nice guy . He was young, but he was already what you’d call a man’s man. He had that strong, skilled, confident presence you usually only see in people like the president, people who make being strong look effortless. How to write a story. For years now I’ve been interested in writing stories.

How to write a story

The only problem is I didn’t know how to write them. So for years now I’ve been studying the art of story writing. I’ve read dozens of “how t”o books and analyzed hundreds of movies. Does substance abuse make you a better writer? Anyone seriously interested in becoming a writer should make a habit out of studying the lives of successful authors.

Does substance abuse make you a better writer?

If you do that you’ll inevitably notice that a lot of famous authors have been alcohol and drug abusers. This raises the question, does substance abuse make you a better writer? For a lot of reasons, the short answer is, it can, but there’s no substitute for solid technique, and the added creative boost that substance abuse can give you comes at a great cost. Consider that for every successful drug abusing author there are dozens (if not hundreds) of authors who succeeded without the help of mind altering chemicals. More importantly, for every successful drug abusing author there are countless drug abusing would-be writers who merely ended up depraved, unsung drug addicts. 16 tips to overcoming writers block. This list is arranged in a semi-chronological order relative to the career of a writer.

16 tips to overcoming writers block

Beginner writers will suffer from writers’ block for different reasons that professional writers, and professional writers will suffer less writers block because they will have already overcome the hurdles at the beginning of this list. Most of the items on this list will be ongoing issues in your life that overlap each other. Some of them are things you’ll do your entire life. Also,…. it goes without saying that no two writers are alike, and no two methods will provide the same results for any two writers.

10 Reasons why writers should blog. No matter what kind of writing you do this probably applies: 1.

10 Reasons why writers should blog

Blogging allows you to keep an up to date backup of your work, and after you’ve written a few hundred posts your blog also serves as a historical vault. 2. It allows the general public to give you negative feedback. This might sound like a bad thing, but writers who get butt hurt over negative feedback from the public are like bikers who whine about riding in the rain. Anyway, negative feedback from the public can be used as constructive criticism if you look at it stoically. Why grammar is important. September 19, 2010 Society doesn’t respect proper grammar as much as it used to.

Why grammar is important

Rappers and valley girls think it’s cool to use improper grammar. The fact that we have the term “grammar Nazi” just goes to show how little society respects grammar. 11 things I learned from blogging on Myspace. 1. Why you shouldn’t mock aspiring writers. In Biblical times a country town was lucky to have a single literate member. In the middle ages only the aristocray, clergy and merchant class were literate. Eventually the middle class became literate, and today every teen knows enough words to sext. In fact, if your child never sees a single letter until they start kindergarten you will go to jail. At every stage in history the few people who could read and write controlled where history would go next and what ideas every educated school child would be raised on afterwards. How do you eat an elephant? Once upon a time there was a mouse named Strauss who lived in a little bakery in a little village in a little country. Strauss lived a good life by mouse standards, and mice only have three standards.

One, get enough to eat. Two, find a safe place to live, and three, make enough friends that you’re not lonely but not so many that you’re overwhelmed. Strauss had as many friends as he cared to have, but he didn’t have to share the bakery with any of them on account of they were all afraid of the baker who had a reputation for swatting mice. It’s not that the baker was a mean person, but he did have a business to run after all, and it wouldn’t do to have mice nibbling holes in the treats you’re trying to sell.

Even though Strauss had everything he needed, he still had big dreams…big mouse dreams that is. Still half asleep but curious, Strauss left his little mouse bed to investigate and was surprised to see a large group of children crowding around the center table in the dining area.