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Les quatre piliers de l’apprentissage - Stanislas Dehaene

Les quatre piliers de l’apprentissage - Stanislas Dehaene

http://www.paristechreview.com/2013/11/07/apprentissage-neurosciences/

Related:  cerveau et cognitionNeurosciencesRessources pédagogiquesCourants pédagogiques et psychologiquesNEUROSCIENCES

What is Mindset Every so often a truly groundbreaking idea comes along. This is one. Mindset explains: Why brains and talent don’t bring success How they can stand in the way of it Why praising brains and talent doesn’t foster self-esteem and accomplishment, but jeopardizes them How teaching a simple idea about the brain raises grades and productivity What all great CEOs, parents, teachers, athletes know Mindset is a simple idea discovered by world-renowned Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck in decades of research on achievement and success—a simple idea that makes all the difference. In a fixed mindset, people believe their basic qualities, like their intelligence or talent, are simply fixed traits.

Neuroscientists create ‘atlas’ showing how words are organised in the brain Scientists have created an “atlas of the brain” that reveals how the meanings of words are arranged across different regions of the organ. Like a colourful quilt laid over the cortex, the atlas displays in rainbow hues how individual words and the concepts they convey can be grouped together in clumps of white matter. “Our goal was to build a giant atlas that shows how one specific aspect of language is represented in the brain, in this case semantics, or the meanings of words,” said Jack Gallant, a neuroscientist at the University of California, Berkeley. No single brain region holds one word or concept.

Response: Differentiation Is Important 'Because We Teach Students Not Standards' - Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo (This is the first post in a two-part series) This week's question comes from an educator who wishes to remain anonymous: Differentiating for students, as I understand it, entails meeting students at their levels, but the end goal is to ensure that they meet the standards for the grade level. What happens when, for whatever reason, you have one or more students who are reading several grade levels below and even the lowest level expectation for that child/ren will still not enable the student/s to meet the standard for the grade level? Differentiation has certainly been in the news recently. It's a word that educators hear a lot, and a lot is done in its name.

6 Education Theorists All Teachers Should Know Infographic Teacher Infographics 6 Education Theorists All Teachers Should Know Infographic 6 Education Theorists All Teachers Should Know Infographic The 6 Education Theorists All Teachers Should Know present 6 people that did some of the major research in education. Lev Vygotsky How do you decide the level at which to instruct your students? The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know - TeachThought The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know by Judy Willis M.D., M.Ed., radteach.com As education continues to evolve, adding in new trends, technologies, standards, and 21st century thinking habits, there is one constant that doesn’t change. The human brain.

Metacognition: Nurturing Self-Awareness in the Classroom How do children gain a deeper understanding of how they think, feel, and act so that they can improve their learning and develop meaningful relationships? Since antiquity, philosophers have been intrigued with how human beings develop self-awareness -- the ability to examine and understand who we are relative to the world around us. Today, research not only shows that self-awareness evolves during childhood, but also that its development is linked to metacognitive processes of the brain. Making Sense of Life Experiences Most teachers know that if students reflect on how they learn, they become better learners.

Portail Innovation et expérimentation - Article - 2012 - 2014 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

Response: Differentiation Lets Us Reach Our Students 'Where They Are' - Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo (This is the last post in a two-part series. You can see Part One here.) This week's question comes from an educator who wishes to remain anonymous: Differentiating for students, as I understand it, entails meeting students at their levels, but the end goal is to ensure that they meet the standards for the grade level. What happens when, for whatever reason, you have one or more students who are reading several grade levels below and even the lowest level expectation for that child/ren will still not enable the student/s to meet the standard for the grade level? In Part One, three well-known educators/authors provide guest responses: Regie Routman, Carol Ann Tomlinson, and Laura Robb.

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