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A Game to Map the Brain

A Game to Map the Brain

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Matthew effect (sociology) For unto every one that hath shall be given, and he shall have abundance: but from him that hath not shall be taken even that which he hath. Sociology of science[edit] In the sociology of science, "Matthew effect" was a term coined by Robert K. Merton to describe how, among other things, eminent scientists will often get more credit than a comparatively unknown researcher, even if their work is similar; it also means that credit will usually be given to researchers who are already famous.[3][4] For example, a prize will almost always be awarded to the most senior researcher involved in a project, even if all the work was done by a graduate student. This was later formulated by Stephen Stigler as Stigler's law — "No scientific discovery is named after its original discoverer" — with Stigler explicitly naming Merton as the true discoverer, making his 'law' in example of itself.

Foldit Foldit is an online puzzle video game about protein folding. The game is part of an experimental research project, and is developed by the University of Washington's Center for Game Science in collaboration with the UW Department of Biochemistry. The objective of the game is to fold the structure of selected proteins as well as possible, using various tools provided within the game. The highest scoring solutions are analysed by researchers, who determine whether or not there is a native structural configuration (or native state) that can be applied to the relevant proteins, in the "real world". Scientists can then use such solutions to solve "real-world" problems, by targeting and eradicating diseases, and creating biological innovations.

70,000+ Have Played ‘Eyewire’ Game That Trains Computers To Map the Brain Your connectome, the map of all 86 billion connected neurons in your brain, is hopelessly complex. In fact, one human connectome has a staggering 10,000 times that number of neural pathways. Every thought you have and every memory you hold exists in your connectome, and major efforts are under way to map it. One Ocean: The Nature of Things with David Suzuki: CBC-TV One Ocean Download Unity Web Player Get Unity 3D to Play

How to plan a round-the-world trip - travel tips and articles Itʼs the ultimate trip: circumnavigating the planet, and stopping off wherever takes your fancy. Great for travellers who want to see it all, or who are just plain indecisive. But booking a round-the-world (RTW) trip can be a complex business. Hereʼs our guide to getting started. Help Scientists Record One Day of Sound on Earth The Soundscape Recorder app in action. Image: Brandon Keim Bryan Pijanowski wants to capture the sounds of the world on a single day, and he needs your help. On Earth Day, April 22, Pijanowski hopes to enlist thousands of people in recording a few minutes of their everyday surroundings with his Soundscape Recorder smartphone app. All those sonic snippets could create an unprecedented soundtrack to life on Earth — and as they accumulate, year after year, scientists could use them to measure patterns and changes in our sonic environments. “I’ve been on a campaign to record as many ecosystems as possible,” said Pijanowski, a soundscape ecologist at Purdue University.

Crowd-Sourced Science Project Discovers How The Eye Perceives Motion Crowd-sourced science isn’t just fun and games anymore; it has produced a scientific discovery new and important enough to be published in the journal Nature. The social gaming venture EyeWire lured citizen scientists to follow retinal neurons across multiple two-dimensional photos with the chance to level up and outperform competitors. And with their help, EyeWire has solved a longstanding mystery about how mammals perceive motion. “It’s fabulous to see the first results from EyeWire which add neuroscience for the first time to the list of subjects to which the distributed power of the crowd has made important contributions,” said Chris Lintott, an Oxford University astrophysicist and director of the Zooniverse. Scientists have known since the mid-1960s that certain ganglion cells, the output neurons of the eye, are stimulated by movement in one direction but not the others.

Games and Puzzles Science Games Who Wants to Win $1,000,000? - Answer 15 science and math based questions correctly and become a (pretend!) 100 Exquisite Adjectives By Mark Nichol Adjectives — descriptive words that modify nouns — often come under fire for their cluttering quality, but often it’s quality, not quantity, that is the issue. Plenty of tired adjectives are available to spoil a good sentence, but when you find just the right word for the job, enrichment ensues. Practice precision when you select words. in Depth GAP2’s purpose is to demonstrate the role and value of stakeholder driven science within the context of fisheries’ governance. Who we are Funded by the European Commission’s FP7 Capacities’ programme, GAP2′s work is coordinated by an interdisciplinary team across Europe, with expertise ranging from social science to fisheries management. More about our team here. What we do

thank you for the great comment! by odinkral Mar 1

this system of retinal neurons is in the shape of a tree - the "dendritic" form of nerves. "Dendron" is the greek word for trees, and is a ubiquitous shape in nature (rivers, cave tunnels, lung bronchae, blood vessels. We are interested in family trees. Mathematicians use the word "tree" in very specific ways. This means trees are everywhere with us - our culture, our breathing, the beating of our hearts. by nalini.nadkarni Mar 1

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