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Nine Elements

Nine Elements
Nine Themes of Digital Citizenship Digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use. 1. Digital Access: full electronic participation in society. Technology users need to be aware that not everyone has the same opportunities when it comes to technology. Working toward equal digital rights and supporting electronic access is the starting point of Digital Citizenship. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Respect, Educate and Protect (REPs) These elements have also been organized under the principles of respect, educate and protect. Respect Your Self/Respect Others - Etiquette - Access - Law Educate Your Self/Connect with Others - Literacy - Communication - Commerce Protect Your Self/Protect Others -Rights and Responsibility - Safety (Security) - Health and Welfare If this was to be taught beginning at the kindergarten level it would follow this pattern: Repetition 1 (kindergarten to second grade) Respect Your Self/Respect Others Digital Etiquette

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Scope & Sequence: Common Sense K-12 Digital Citizenship Curriculum Get Trained Use our professional development resources to learn best practices for teaching digital citizenship to your students. Onboard Students: Digital Passport Introduce students in grades 3-5 to Digital Passport, our award-winning suite of games that help onboard students to the foundational skills of digital citizenship and Internet safety. Teach Lessons: Unit 1 Teach Lessons: Unit 2 Digital Citizenship Be a first class digital citizen! Tim & Moby guide you through the dos, the don’ts, the whys and the whats with this great collection of ICT topics, activities, and printable materials. On the Spotlight homepage you’ll find a Cyberbullying Activity, a Social Networking FYI, the Information Privacy Quiz and a host of helpful movies:

Thoughtful Learning: Curriculum for 21st Century Skills, Inquiry, Project-Based Learning, and Problem-Based Learning The 21st century skills are a set of abilities that students need to develop in order to succeed in the information age. The Partnership for 21st Century Skills lists three types: Learning Skills Critical Thinking Creative Thinking Collaborating Communicating Literacy Skills Information Literacy Media Literacy Technology Literacy Understanding Your Students: A Glimpse into the Media Habits of Tweens and Teens For today's tweens and teens, technology is part of the fabric of everyday life. They're watching TV on lots of devices and using smartphones and tablets to maximum advantage -- texting, researching, sharing, connecting -- sometimes using multiple devices at once. Educators need to understand how technology fits in children's lives to know how it can be used to support learning. But we can't begin to make sense of what these technological changes mean for kids until we understand what's being used and for how long and how kids feel about technology and media. That's why we're pleased to release a new report, the Common Sense Census: Media Use by Tweens and Tweens, which paints a more complete picture of how tweens and teens are using media. Some findings may not be surprising: Kids like to multitask while doing homework.

Teaching Students Good Digital Citizenship Teachers have long understood the importance of instilling good citizenship in their students, focusing on social etiquette and how to treat their peers with respect in the course of their daily lives. Today, though, it’s just as important that students understand what kinds of behaviors are acceptable online. Instilling the principles of good digital citizenship can help students become smart, responsible, and respectful members of their online communities. What Is Digital Citizenship? We spend much of our lives today participating in virtual communities — like our social media networks, online forums, and even the comments sections of websites and blogs. Just as there are rules and norms that dictate what it means to be a good citizen in our real-life communities, there are ways to be a good “citizen” in the communities we interact with online.

jeadigitalmedia.org Take your students on a Video Scavenger Hunt Teaching the basics of videography and editing to students can feel like a daunting experience sometimes. However, a simple and fun lesson I have developed for my students has proven to pay off with their progress. Take your students on a video scavenger hunt! Who doesn’t like a scavenger hunt?! By following this lesson, you […] The Makings of Maker Spaces, Part 1: Space for Creation, Not Just Consumption Maker spaces in libraries are the latest step in the evolving debate over what public libraries’ core mission is or should be. From collecting in an era of scarce resources to curation in an era of overabundant ones, some libraries are moving to incorporate cocreation: providing the tools to help patrons produce their own works of art or information and sometimes also collecting the results to share with other members of the ­community. Maker spaces promote learning through play; have the potential to demystify science, math, technology, and engineering; and encourage women and under­represented minorities to seek careers in those fields. They also tie in to the growing trend of indie artists in every medium—including books—who are bypassing traditional gatekeepers, taking advantage of new tools to produce professionally polished products, and going direct to the web to seek an audience.

The "New and Improved" Digital Citizenship Survival Kit I have been thinking about some "new" items I could add to my original Digital Citizenship Kit that I created last year. Like I said in that blog post, I love using props when teaching. After some great conversations with the good wife @jenbadura on what I should include, I have come up with some new items to include in the survival kit. Yes, you can use this with your students! After I blogged about the original kit, I had a plethora of teachers email me or send me a tweet me asking if it was okay to use this idea at their school.

Media Literacy: Five Ways Teachers Are Fighting Fake News As the national attention to fake news and the debate over what to do about it continue, one place many are looking for solutions is in the classroom. Since a recent Stanford study showed that students at practically all grade levels can’t determine fake news from the real stuff, the push to teach media literacy has gained new momentum. The study showed that while students absorb media constantly, they often lack the critical thinking skills needed to tell fake news from the real stuff. Teachers are taking up the challenge to change that. NPR Ed put out a social media call asking how educators are teaching fake news and media literacy, and we got a lot of responses. Here’s a sampling from around the country:

I like this because it summarizes for internet users safe practices. by latoyamalone Aug 31

Nine themes for a digital citizenship course - good summary by shellyw39 Jan 17

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