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Dix constats clés de la recherche cognitive sur l'apprentissage (Schneider & Stern, 2010

Dix constats clés de la recherche cognitive sur l'apprentissage (Schneider & Stern, 2010

http://jean.heutte.free.fr/spip.php?article192

Related:  cerveau et cognitionDeeper learning pedagogyNeurosciences

The Impact Of Situated Cognition In eLearning Gathering knowledge is one thing, but being able to apply it in the real world is another. The primary objective of any eLearning course is to give learners the skills and information they need to achieve personal and professional goals. This is why situated cognition is a perfect fit in eLearning strategies. In this article, I will discuss the impact situated cognition has upon online education. While a variety of Instructional Design approaches may prepare learners for the real world by instilling knowledge, situated cognition throws them into the thick of things, so to speak, right from the start. By creating eLearning activities and exercises that are taken straight from the real world, learners have the opportunity to acquire and apply knowledge in context.

Terrific Mini Guide to Help Students Think Critically December 26, 2014 Questioning is the key to critical thinking and through questions students get to explore the deep layers of meanings that would otherwise go unnoticed. Of course not all questions have this analytical ability. For instance, closed questions tend to limit the thinking choices available for students. The same with questions that promote factual recalling. Questions that emphasize the mechanical on the analytical are out of the list. In today's post, I am sharing with you this mini guide created by Foundation of Critical Thinking which you can use with your students to help them better comprehend and apply critical thinking in their learning.

Your brain does not process information and it is not a computer No matter how hard they try, brain scientists and cognitive psychologists will never find a copy of Beethoven’s 5th Symphony in the brain – or copies of words, pictures, grammatical rules or any other kinds of environmental stimuli. The human brain isn’t really empty, of course. But it does not contain most of the things people think it does – not even simple things such as ‘memories’. Visual Learning for Life What is Visual Perception? Visual Perception is the ability to interpret, analyse and give meaning to what is seen. From the moment they step foot inside your classroom, children are taking in visual information and making sense of it in order to learn. Up to 80% of what they learn is through visual opportunities. The process of taking in one's environment is referred to as "perception."

8 Ideas, 10 Guides, And 17 Tools For A Better Professional Learning Network Personal learning networks are a great way for educators to get connected with learning opportunities, access professional development resources, and to build camaraderie with other education professionals. Although PLNs have been around for years, in recent years social media has made it possible for these networks to grow exponentially. Now, it’s possible to expand and connect your network around the world anytime, anywhere. But how exactly do you go about doing that? Check out our guide to growing your personal learning network with social media, full of more than 30 different tips, ideas, useful resources, and social media tools that can make it all possible.

Metacognition: Nurturing Self-Awareness in the Classroom How do children gain a deeper understanding of how they think, feel, and act so that they can improve their learning and develop meaningful relationships? Since antiquity, philosophers have been intrigued with how human beings develop self-awareness -- the ability to examine and understand who we are relative to the world around us. Today, research not only shows that self-awareness evolves during childhood, but also that its development is linked to metacognitive processes of the brain.

6 Rules to Break for Better, Deeper Learning Outcomes As educators, we know when students tune in -- and we know when they tune out. The more elusive question is why. There is emerging consensus that the 20th-century approach to education, which favors methods such as lectures and rote learning, is standing in the way of making school relevant to more students. Fortunately, research is catching up with our intuition and validating the practices that we know work in the classroom. Brain scans better forecast math learning in kids than do skill tests, study finds Brain scans from 8-year-old children can predict gains in their mathematical ability over the next six years, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. The research tracked 43 children longitudinally for six years, starting at age 8, and showed that while brain characteristics strongly indicated which children would be the best math learners over the following six years, the children’s performance on math, reading, IQ and memory tests at age 8 did not. The study, published online Aug. 18 in The Journal of Neuroscience, moves scientists closer to their goal of helping children who struggle to acquire math skills. “We can identify brain systems that support children’s math skill development over six years in childhood and early adolescence,” said the study’s lead author, Tanya Evans, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

6 Tools to Determine Your Kids’ Learning Styles I homeschool for many reasons, not the least of which is that I can do a better job with my two kids than a classroom teacher can with 25 to 30 (or more!). There is no room for debate on this issue. Educational experts have called for decades for smaller class sizes, but as budgets get tighter, class sizes get bigger. There’s no doubt that a personalized education far exceeds a factory model. Teaching time investment: Does online really take more time than face-to-face? Rebecca Van de Vord and Korolyn Pogue Washington State University, USA Abstract Enrollments in online programs are growing, increasing demand for online courses. The perception that teaching online takes more time than teaching face-to-face creates concerns related to faculty workload. To date, the research on teaching time does not provide a clear answer as to the accuracy of this perception.

What is Mindset Every so often a truly groundbreaking idea comes along. This is one. Mindset explains: Why brains and talent don’t bring success How they can stand in the way of it Why praising brains and talent doesn’t foster self-esteem and accomplishment, but jeopardizes them How teaching a simple idea about the brain raises grades and productivity What all great CEOs, parents, teachers, athletes know Benefits of 'Deeper Learning' Schools Highlighted in Studies Published Online: September 30, 2014 Published in Print: October 1, 2014, as Research Shows Benefits of 'Deeper Learning' Approach Students did better in and out of class By Holly Yettick & Kara Brounstein Three sweeping reports have taken the temperature of the so-called "deeper learning" movement and given the approach a fairly clean bill of health in a set of American high schools. On average, students at deeper learning schools had better test results and people skills, the studies found.

How Network Neuroscience Is Creating a New Era of Mind Control Complex networks form the backbone of modern society: the Internet, the aviation network, the pattern of connections between individuals. And more complex examples are constantly emerging—the way genes interact in cells, how information flows through the banking system and the ecosystem. The more complex the system, the harder it is to control. Nevertheless, computer scientists, doctors, economists and the like exercise a modicum of control over many of these networks. And that raises an interesting question: is it possible to exercise the same kind of control over the most complex network we know of: the human brain? Today we get an answer of sorts, thanks to the work of John Medaglia at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and a few pals who assess the discipline that is emerging at the intersection between network neuroscience and network control theory.

The Effect Of Parental Involvement On Academic Achievement The Effect Of Parental Involvement On Academic Achievement by Adrianes Pinantoan, informEd The influence of parental involvement on a student’s academic success should not be underestimated. While brain power, work ethic, and even genetics all play important roles in student achievement, the determining factor comes down to what kind of support system she has at home. Students with two parents operating in supportive roles are 52% more likely to enjoy school and get straight A’s than students whose parents are disengaged with what’s going on at school. This is especially the case during the earliest years of schooling, in Kindergarten through the 5th grade, when students with active parents are almost twice as likely to succeed.

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