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Autism Speaks, Home Page

Autism Speaks, Home Page

http://www.autismspeaks.org/

Related:  Autism, Aspergers, ADHD

Teaching Students with Aspergers Syndrome: Tips for Teachers and Parents Students with asperger's syndrome may experience difficulties with focusing as well as lack of focus. Focus involves attention. Sometimes asperger's students focus all their attention on a particular object or subject; therefore, they fail to focus on what information the instructor is presenting. All their energy is directed toward a particular subject or object. Why? Asperger's syndrome: Alternative medicine Asperger's syndrome is a developmental disorder that affects a person's ability to socialize and communicate effectively with others. Children with Asperger's syndrome typically exhibit social awkwardness and an all-absorbing interest in specific topics. Doctors group Asperger's syndrome with other conditions that are called autistic spectrum disorders or pervasive developmental disorders. These disorders all involve problems with social skills and communication.

Autism Fact Sheet The hallmark feature of ASD is impaired social interaction. As early as infancy, a baby with ASD may be unresponsive to people or focus intently on one item to the exclusion of others for long periods of time. A child with ASD may appear to develop normally and then withdraw and become indifferent to social engagement. Children with an ASD may fail to respond to their names and often avoid eye contact with other people. Teaching Aspergers Children: Tips For Teachers Educators can be great allies in keeping your youngster with Aspergers (AS) or High-Functioning Autism safe and successful in school, but you'll need to make sure they have all the knowledge they need to help. Use the suggestions below to create an information packet to bring educators up to speed... The Five Main Things Educators Need to Know—

If You've Never Used These English Idioms, You're Probably Not a Native Engli... Those of us who grew up with English as our first language have been exposed to idioms and idiomatic expressions for most of our lives. They may have confused us a little when we were children, but explanation and constant exposure not only increased our understanding of them, but likely drew them into our own vernacular. If you’re in the process of learning the English language, you may come across some of these and not be entirely sure what they mean. Here’s a list of 20 that you’re likely to come across fairly often: 1. Guidelines for teaching students with Asperger syndrome in further education colleges As well as behaviour, the areas of impairment will affect the thought processes that govern behavioural responses to the environment and responses to the demands made by people, and situations arising within this space. I will briefly outline the triad of impairments and the specific characteristics of Asperger syndrome before continuing. Asperger syndrome is a condition which forms part of the autism spectrum, it is caused by a biological brain dysfunction.

Finished at School Programme evaluated The Finished at School Programme was a DfE–funded project that commenced in 2013 and concluded earlier this year. It was launched to support more young people with autism to access further education and achieve a positive transition to adulthood. At the time the project was established, fewer than one in four young people with autism were continuing their education beyond school. We appointed the Centre for Educational Development, Appraisal and Research (CEDAR) at the University of Warwick to evaluate the project. The evaluator’s remit was to determine the impact of the project: what difference it made to the young people, schools and colleges involved.

What is Asperger syndrome? Here we explain more about Asperger syndrome - a form of autism - including the three main difficulties that people with Asperger syndrome share, how many people have the condition, and what may cause it. As soon as we meet a person we make judgements about them. From their facial expression, tone of voice and body language we can usually tell whether they are happy, angry or sad and respond accordingly. People with Asperger syndrome can find it harder to read the signals that most of us take for granted. This means they find it more difficult to communicate and interact with others which can lead to high levels of anxiety and confusion. About Asperger syndrome

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