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How to Give a Great Presentation: Timeless Advice from a Legendary Adman, 1981

How to Give a Great Presentation: Timeless Advice from a Legendary Adman, 1981
by Maria Popova “No speech was ever too short.” “Read the Roman-Raphaelson book on writing. Read it three times,” David Ogilvy famously commanded in the first of his 10 uncompromising tips on writing. Indeed, more than thirty years after its original publication in 1981, Writing That Works: How to Communicate Effectively In Business (UK; public library) by former Ogilvy & Mather CEO Kenneth Roman and legendary adman Joel Raphaelson offers some timelessly practical tips on the art, science, and psychology of successful communication, in business and beyond. Because even if you’ve happily bid the corporate world adieu and figured out a way to avoid work by doing what you love, there are certain skills and techniques you’ll find yourself resorting to again and again in order to communicate your ideas with impact, whatever your discipline. Take, for instance, the art of a great presentation. An additional section explores “speeches that make a point” with several tips: Donating = Loving

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/12/20/writing-that-works-roman/

Related:  Communication and Writing

The Shape of Spectacular Speech: An Infographic Analysis of What Made MLK’s “I Have a Dream” Great by Maria Popova The poetics of presenting, or why beautiful metaphors are better than beautiful slides. On August 28, 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. rose to the top of the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom and delivered his legendary “I Have a Dream” speech before 250,000 civil rights supporters. It would go on to reverberate through the nation, reaching millions more, and through history, inspiring generations and forever changing the course of culture.

Organizers Forms, Templates, Documents The Organizers sub-category contains forms that can be useful when planning daily schedules or organizing personal information. These forms include Event Mailing Organizer, Address Book, and a Weekly Planner. Teacher’s Attendance and Roll BookThe Teacher’s Attendance and Roll Book is designed for keeping classroom attendance records on a monthly basis. Next Page » 100 Diagrams That Changed the World by Maria Popova A visual history of human sensemaking, from cave paintings to the world wide web. Since the dawn of recorded history, we’ve been using visual depictions to map the Earth, order the heavens, make sense of time, dissect the human body, organize the natural world, perform music, and even concretize abstract concepts like consciousness and love. 100 Diagrams That Changed the World (UK; public library) by investigative journalist and documentarian Scott Christianson chronicles the history of our evolving understanding of the world through humanity’s most groundbreaking sketches, illustrations, and drawings, ranging from cave paintings to The Rosetta Stone to Moses Harris’s color wheel to Tim Berners-Lee’s flowchart for a “mesh” information management system, the original blueprint for the world wide web.

Five Presentation Mistakes Everyone Makes - Nancy Duarte by Nancy Duarte | 2:00 PM December 12, 2012 We all know what it’s like to sit through a bad presentation. We can easily spot the flaws — too long, too boring, indecipherable, what have you — when we watch others speak. The thing is, when we take the stage ourselves, many of us fall into the same traps. How Hans Christian Andersen Revolutionized Storytelling, Plus the Best Illustrations from 150 Years of His Beloved Fairy Tales by Maria Popova “Andersen had the ability to articulate desires petty and profound and make them into transcendent tales.” “When people talk listen completely,” Hemingway counseled in his advice on how to be a writer. More than a century earlier, a little boy in Denmark, born into poverty to a shoemaker father and an illiterate washerwoman mother, was spending his days listening to the old women in the local insane asylum as they spun their yarn and spun their tales to pass the time.

How to create an internet radio station If you’ve ever wondered how internet radio stations work and/or wanted to create your own, this tutorial will show you how. It is actually very easy, and you can set up your own radio station and begin broadcasting songs in about 10 minutes. First of all, let me give you a quick rundown on how it works. You have your music player (I will use Winamp, get it if you don’t have it) and you play your music as you normally would. You probably need a fast internet connection so you can broadcast without buffering occuring. Through a plugin (which you will download and install), Winamp will send the music you play to the broadcasting server (which can be on your PC or on another one with a larger connection), and the server sends the music to the listeners, reencoding it to a better format, if you are so inclined.

How to Write a presentation I’ve just read (or in some cases skimmed) all 691 submissions that came in through our Web 2.0 New York call for participation. There’s some truly great stuff in there, and I feel a little like a Harvard admissions officer; we’ll accept fewer than 1 in 10 submissions, which means that there are literally hundreds of excellent talks that we will decline. I’m thrilled and amazed at the interest in the event, especially given the somewhat early deadline, but saying no to talented, engaged, and knowledgeable would-be speakers is no fun.

How to Avoid Work: A 1949 Guide to Doing What You Love by Maria Popova “Life really begins when you have discovered that you can do anything you want.” “There is an ugliness in being paid for work one does not like,” Anaïs Nin wrote in her diary in 1941.

Related:  techdigital literacy