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Steven Pinker: Linguistics as a Window to Understanding the Brain

Steven Pinker: Linguistics as a Window to Understanding the Brain

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-B_ONJIEcE

Related:  Vocabularywords,words, wordsmercurioLinguistics and Language processingLinguistics

A Brief Guide to Embodied Cognition: Why You Are Not Your Brain Embodied cognition, the idea that the mind is not only connected to the body but that the body influences the mind, is one of the more counter-intuitive ideas in cognitive science. In sharp contrast is dualism, a theory of mind famously put forth by Rene Descartes in the 17th century when he claimed that “there is a great difference between mind and body, inasmuch as body is by nature always divisible, and the mind is entirely indivisible… the mind or soul of man is entirely different from the body.” In the proceeding centuries, the notion of the disembodied mind flourished. From it, western thought developed two basic ideas: reason is disembodied because the mind is disembodied and reason is transcendent and universal. However, as George Lakoff and Rafeal Núñez explain: Cognitive science calls this entire philosophical worldview into serious question on empirical grounds… [the mind] arises from the nature of our brains, bodies, and bodily experiences.

The Mind is a Metaphor: As It Were As It Were · 2006-09-27 by Brad Pasanek Must we mean what we say? In the case of metaphor, meaning is underspecified, patently false, or—according to some theorists—somehow transmuted. Earth - Can any animals talk and use language like humans? In April 2010, Adriano Lameira set up his video camera in front of an enclosure at Cologne Zoo in Germany. Inside was an orangutan called Tilda. There was a rumour that Tilda could whistle like a human, and Lameira, of Amsterdam University in the Netherlands, was keen to capture it on camera. But as the camera kept rolling, Tilda did much more than just whistle.

Language electives pathway : Modern languages electives : ... : Sussex Centre for Language Studies Language pathways are open to undergraduates studying for a single honours degree course. Languages offered The following languages are offered as electives: ArabicBritish Sign Language and Deaf CultureMandarin ChineseFrenchGermanItalianJapaneseSpanish The Weird Thing About Facebook: Status Updates Are The Most Memorable Writing You Do If you’re a Facebook skeptic and believe that most status updates are over-sharey and show-offy (babies, weddings, the aftermath of too much beer), you are not wrong. But whether inane or informative, there’s something interesting about Facebook status updates: According to a new study, we are one and a half times more likely to remember them than any other form of written language. In fact, we remember the random online blathering of friends and family two and a half times more consistently than we remember faces. These are the unequivocal findings of “Major Memory in Microblogs,” a new study from the University of California, San Diego, and the University of Warwick. “It’s not that you can remember the Facebook posts a little better--you can remember them a lot better,” says study co-author Dr.

Imagine A Flying Pig: How Words Take Shape In The Brain : Shots - Health News hide captionAlthough a flying pig doesn't exist in the real world, our brains use what we know about pigs and birds — and superheroes — to create one in our mind's eye when we hear or read those words. iStockphoto.com Although a flying pig doesn't exist in the real world, our brains use what we know about pigs and birds — and superheroes — to create one in our mind's eye when we hear or read those words. This is a story about a duck.

13 Wonderful Old English Words We Should Still Be Using Today As the years pass, language evolves. Since the days of Chaucer and Shakespeare, we can all agree English has become less flowery. Some fantastic vocabulary just dropped out of everyday conversation. Shakespeare Plays Available in Video Format I am here attempting to provide as complete a survey as practical of the currently available versions of Shakespeare’s plays on mass-market tangible media. My main goal here has been to gather and organize information from various sources and make it available to teachers, students, and other interested individuals in homes and schools of every sort, in the hope that watching more Shakespeare will enhance appreciation of this remarkable body of work — both the plays themselves and their profound performance legacy. Watching a play on film or television is fundamentally different from watching the same play live on the stage, and there are advantages and disadvantages to each. Even filmed stage productions lack the essential immediacy of live theater. If you’ve never seen a Shakespeare play live, do so when you can. Nothing you will find here is going to be the same kind of experience.

Linguistic relativity The principle of linguistic relativity holds that the structure of a language affects the ways in which its respective speakers conceptualize their world, i.e. their world view, or otherwise influences their cognitive processes. Popularly known as the Sapir–Whorf hypothesis, or Whorfianism, the principle is often defined to include two versions: Strong version: that language determines thought and that linguistic categories limit and determine cognitive categoriesWeak version: that linguistic categories and usage influence thought and certain kinds of non-linguistic behaviour. The term "Sapir–Whorf hypothesis" is a misnomer, because Edward Sapir and Benjamin Lee Whorf never co-authored anything, and never stated their ideas in terms of a hypothesis.

Your words matter Often what happens when people are just talking to each other in their everyday lives is that they are just talking and talking and no one is really listening. Then when every once in a while somebody does listen, they have some kind of overreaction to what someone said or how someone said it; therefore, there’s a great deal of miscommunication going on, and you don’t create a sense of intimacy and connection between you and the other person. Most of the time when people speak to each other, they’re doing a number of things that ultimately don’t lead to good communication. For one, people are very reactive in the ways that they respond; they hear something and, even before they realize what they’re hearing, they have emotional responses. People can get very defensive very quickly, and therefore we’re not always keeping an eye on how we are responding to what someone is saying. You also recommend that people keep their communication brief.

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